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Australians, NZers prefer print: survey

Thursday, 05 October 2017
By Print21

More than seven out of ten Australians prefer reading printed books and magazines to online versions, according to a new global survey by paper and print lobby group Two Sides.

The survey of 10,700 consumers was carried out in June by researcher Toluna in ten countries: Australia, Brazil, France, Germany, Italy, New Zealand, South Africa, Spain, the United Kingdom and the United States.

‘Consumers have a preference for print over online’: Kellie Northwood, executive director, Two Sides Australia.

“We wanted to survey Australian and New Zealand consumers as part of a global survey to offer a representative voice to any regional differences in these two consumer markets for one of the largest and most established media channels – print,” said Kellie Northwood, executive director, Two Sides Australia.

The results revealed a strong global preference for print – including books, magazines and newspapers – when it comes to recreational reading. 72% of global respondents preferred printed books, compared to only 9% preferring e-books. Significant country differences were also identified: in Germany, 75% of consumers prefer a printed newspaper, but in Spain, only 42%.

There was also greater trust in print over digital. 76% of all respondents believe “fake news” is a worrying trend and only 24% trust the news stories they read on social media. In addition, 63% of all respondents believe reading news in a printed newspaper provides a deep understanding of the story.

“Local findings are consistent with the global results and report a strong resentment of online advertising in both Australia (72%) and New Zealand (76%), with consumers saying they do not pay attention to online advertisements,” said Northwood.

“The survey results in our region indicate consumers have a preference for print over online. With media indexes reporting digital advertising growth has slowed, marketers looking to develop consumer trust, connection and engagement are tapping back into the power of print,” concluded Northwood.

The survey also revealed consumers have a negative perception of online advertising. 68% of global respondents say they don’t pay attention to online ads and 62% find them annoying and usually not relevant. A further 57% of global respondents do their best to block or avoid online ads.

Concerns about security and privacy were also evident. 71% are concerned their personal information held electronically is at risk of being hacked, stolen, lost or damaged and 73% keep paper copies of important documents at home for safety and security.

Almost nine out of ten consumers believe they should have the right to choose how they receive communications (printed or electronically) from financial organisations and service providers, with 77% agreeing they should not be charged more for choosing paper bills and statements.

If you are looking to find out more about the study, TSA Limited will be hosting a webinar for members and stakeholders on October 10th at 12pm AEDT.

Key findings from Australia

  • 72% of Australians prefer to read printed books and magazines in print and 56% prefer to read news in print
  • 67% agreed reading a printed magazine and 68% agreed reading a print book is more enjoyable than reading one on an electronic device
  • 47% read a printed book at least once a week while only 24% use an e-reader
  • 61% gain a deeper understanding of the story when read from print media
  • 67% regularly read news on a digital device, but 59% would be concerned if printed newspapers disappeared.

Key Findings from New Zealand

  • 76% of New Zealanders prefer to read printed books and magazines in print
  • 72% agree that reading printed magazines and 70% agree reading printed books is more enjoyable than reading them on digital devices
  • 49% read a printed book at least once a week while only 25% use an e-reader
  • 54% gain a deeper understanding of a story when reading it from printed media
  • 78% regularly read news on a digital device but 57% would be concerned if printed newspapers disappeared.

Read the full reports here. 

 

 

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