Archive for March, 2002

  • Overflow…extra news…more news…overflow…extra news…

    The PaperlinX Besley and Pike envelope factory in Brisbane is to close. PaperlinX Executive General Manager, David Goldthorp, confirmed the company will be moving the web long run machines installed by Spicers, as well as the blank fed machines, south from the Brisbane plant. The rationalisation will result in a simplified product range, focusing more on items such as commodity stock envelopes.

    PaperlinX denies the move has breeched non-compete agreements signed with Amcor when it sold its envelope business back in 1999. The company is in the position of being a major supplier of raw materials to other manufacturers of products in markets where PaperlinX businesses are already competing.

    According to a report in URS Forestry/Ausnewz Goldthorp states that it is not the intention of PaperlinX to compete in the envelope market on any other terms than purely commercial. He is aware of possible concerns by some customers, such as envotec, that PaperlinX may have an unfair advantage, but he stresses there is a clear separation between the supply and converting businesses of PaperlinX.

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    Adobe revenue slumped 19 per cent to US$49.8 million for the first quarter of 2002, compared to $69.8 million reported in the first quarter of 2001, and $34.3 million in the fourth quarter of 2001. Operating profit was $72.7 million in the first quarter of 2002, compared to $119.0 million in the first quarter of 2001 and $67.9 million in the fourth quarter of 2001. As a percentage of revenue, operating profit for the first quarter was 27.1 per cent, compared to 36.2 per cent in the first quarter of 2001 and 25.7 percent in the fourth quarter of 2001.

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    Designers, pre-press and print owners/operators are invited to attend Digital Directions 2002 – the Conference to be held at the Landmark Hotel, Port Stephen’s 16 – 19 May 2002. Port Stephen’s is a comfortable 2.5 hours drive north of Sydney and provides a relaxing location to consider the focus, future and fortune of your business.
    Digital Directions – the Conference is the culmination of a national technology roadshow by the same name and featuring Chris Heric, renowned PDF and digital workflow expert from the USA. The event also incorporates the annual conference of the Graphic Arts Services Association of Australia and is supported by the QPA. Contact Garry Knespal at garry@gasaa.asn.au

    ______________________________________

    SWOP Inc. has named the CGS ORIS Digital Proofing System as the first inkjet proofer using Epson printers to meet the publishing industry’s Specifications for Web Offset Publications (SWOP) certification. “We are especially honoured to achieve SWOP certification,” said Trevor Haworth, President & CEO of the USA-based CGS Publishing Technologies International. “We have proved that the critical components of ink, paper, software and printer all add up to a high level of colour accuracy and consistency and provide our customers with the confidence that they are meeting the colour requirements of the printing and publishing industry”

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    This offer comes from an over enthusiastic IPEX-goer who can no longer go to Birmingham.
    Great B&B available in a 300-year old Inn in Warwick for IPEX from 7th-17th April. We have one room too many for IPEX, so if you are thinking of going and want really good, INEXPENSIVE, handy accommodation, contact Carla at CyraChrome 02 9420 8188. The cost is GBP65 per night including traditional English breakfast.

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    The board of directors of Hewlett-Packard says that based on a preliminary estimate of shareowner proxies by its proxy solicitor, it believes it has received sufficient votes to approve HP’s merger with Compaq Computer. The company acknowledged, however, that this is not an official vote.
    Official certification of the voting results by the independent inspectors of election, IVS Associates, is expected in the next few weeks, at which time the certified results will be announced promptly.

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    Want to bid for a Bradman bat? Each year Ricoh conducts a Charity Golf Day and Auction with proceeds directed to The Sunnyfield Association.
    While most items are on offer to Golf Day participants, there are a number of high profile auction items that would benefit from wider exposure. Print21online readers have the opportunity to email an offer by Thursday 28 March 2002. The items include a Limited edition portrait bat signed by Don Bradman, George Gregan signed football boots from the World Cup and a signed British Lions jersey.
    Email address is lharaldson@ricoh.com.au. Enquiries can be made to Norman
    Koslowski on 02-8977 1442.

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    The latest issue of CTPExposure, the KPG online bulletin that attempts to provide a comprehensive information service about CTP is now available. If you want to get on the free list for this industry resource sign up at:

    http://lists.outputdsj.com.au/mailman/listinfo.cgi/ctpexposure

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    The first Heidelberg NexPress 2100 digital colour production press will be installed at Sir Speedy printing franchise centres around the USA for on-the-job testing and qualification. “Our franchisees have embraced digital printing as a customer solution, and NexPress delivers the technology to meet their demands,” says Sir Speedy vice president of strategic development Karl Post. “Sir Speedy has been involved in the development of the NexPress for more than two years, and we find the NexPress an invaluable addition to our business.” Sir Speedy is one of the largest printing franchise chains in the USA and has 1,100 centres in 23 countries.

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    Australian exports of wood and paper products to China are likely to increase in the next decade said the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ABARE) in a statement. “China is likely to need substantial imports of wood and paper products until at least 2010 and Australia has the opportunity to supply this market,” ABARE Executive Director, Brian Fisher said. “Exports to China of medium density fibreboard, and packaging and industrial paper appear to have good prospects for growth.”

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    It couldn’t happen here, could it? A Spanish gravure and web offset operation printer has reached agreement with its staff over a 10 percent wage cut. The German-owned company had wanted a 24 percent wage cut in order to stem losses at the 500 employee company close to Barcelona. It blamed intense price competition and lack of work for the decision. However as a result of the negotiated settlement, including a three-year freeze in wage rates, the company now has a good future says CEO Gunther Nathaus.

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    Small business’s rights and obligations under the Trade Practices Act 1974 are the focus of an Australian Competition and Consumer Commission publication reissued this week. Small business and the Trade Practices Act is a practical guide for Australian small business owners, managers and advisers. The guide discusses how small business should take the Act into account in dealing with suppliers, competitors and customers. Get a copy at www.accc.gov.au

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    And this means…what? “Xeikon is a truly Flemish company that is prominently present,” says Guido Dumarey, CEO of Punch, the home town Belgian electronics business that bought the troubled digital press manufacturer

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    And finally, this one for all the public relations and marketing girls.

    Marketing Terms Defined

    You see a gorgeous guy at a party. You go up to him and say, “I’m fantastic in bed.”
    That’s Direct Marketing.

    You’re at a party with a bunch of friends and see a gorgeous guy . One of your friends goes up to him and pointing at you says, “She’s fantastic in bed.”
    That’s Advertising.

    You see a gorgeous guy at a party. You go up to him and get his telephone number. The next day you call and say, “Hi, I’m fantastic in bed.”
    That’s Telemarketing.

    You’re at a party and see a gorgeous guy. You get up and straighten your skirt; you walk up to him and hand him his drink. You offer him a lift, remind him of your name when he forgets it, tell him he’s gorgeous and then say, “By the way, I’m fantastic in bed.”
    That’s Public Relations.

    You’re at a party and see a gorgeous guy. He walks up to you and says, “I hear you’re fantastic in bed.”
    That’s Brand Recognition.

  • Adast goes broke

    Best known for its partnership with Presstek in producing the direct imaging Adast 705C DI Series B3-size sheetfed press the company is continuing to operate while its management is in negotiations with various parties to obtain interim financing.

    The Adast 705C DI, sold by Presstek and manufactured by Adast, is a series of four- and five-color four-up direct-imaging perfecting press models that can image up to five plates simultaneously. It is also sold as the Xerox offset printing press under the Presstek banner. There does not appear to be any operating in Australia and New Zealand.

    According to Presstek president and chief executive Robert Hallman the Adast bankruptcy is not expected to materially impact Presstek’s 2002 operating plan. “We anticipated only minimal revenues from this B3-size sheetfed press product line in the current fiscal year.

    “We believe that we have an adequate supply of Adast presses and spare parts to meet the projected needs of our customers in the near term. We are working with Adast to continue receiving our open orders, and are exploring alternative manufacturing sources, including the use of
    existing manufacturing partners of our other products. We do not believe this bankruptcy will impact any other portion of our business.”

    Presstek is the developer of a dry imaging plate technology that pioneered on-press imaging and to a lesser extent the whole CTP revolution. Its imaging system is currently being used on Heidelberg presses.

  • Paper price rises are a bit of a punt

    Mill viability issues are behind the latest price increase coming from paper merchants this month. Already Spicers, Daltons and CPI have lifted prices, with the other merchants either ahead of the game or expected to follow suit.

    The price rises, three percent for uncoated and five for coated (offsets), are against the run of demand which is universally recognised as flat if not falling for the first quarter of this year. The merchants admit that they are waiting to see “if the price rises will take.” It is accepted wisdom that paper price rises have little impact on the demand for printing.

    “The price rises are being forced on us by the mills,” said Greg Street, general manger of Spicers. “I recognise that this is not a good time for printers who are suffering too but we have no choice but to pass on any price increases.

    The same story comes from Lachlan Duncan, national sales development manager of CPI, who confirms the company’s price rises his month.
    “It’s certainly not something we are happy about and we will not be better off after passing on the price rises,” he said.

    John Doggitt confirmed that the independent is in the process of compiling a new price book and expects to lift prices in line with the market in three weeks time. “We’re governed by world markets. When the Europeans and Asian lift prices they don’t care about Australian conditions,” he said. He maintains that while printing demand is flat it’s no worse than usual for this quiet time of the year.

    Viability issues at mills in Indonesia, Korea and Thailand are being blamed for the hikes, which come at the same time, that European mills are taking downtime on their paper machines in an attempt to put a floor under the price of paper.

    Printers can expect another price rise later in the year if the merchants succeed in getting this one through. Prices are recognised at being at an historical low along with a rise in bad debt suffered by merchants as significant printing companies go to the wall.

  • Trade in your old Pantone before it fades away

    Under the new program, a customer who purchases a new PANTONE formula guide coated/uncoated may return the old guide to Pantone and receive a free PANTONE formula guide solid matte version. The new PANTONE formula guides feature brighter paper stock, most often specified by designers, and 147 additional colours not found in older guides, for a total of 1,114 colours.

    “Every day, Pantone receives numerous calls from designers and printers with colour matching problems. Often, these problems arise because of a breakdown in colour communication due to an out-of-date PANTONE formula guide,” explained Doris Brown, Pantone’s vice president of marketing. “A designer may be looking to achieve a colour from a guide that has changed over time, or a printer may not come up with the exact colour the designer wants because his book is worn and covered with ink stains.

    “There are many in the graphic arts industry who feel that the lifetime of a PANTONE formula guide is infinite. The unavoidable fact is that they are printed with ink on paper – regardless of their treatment, ink will fade, paper will discolour, and the varnish in the ink can alter its true and original colour over a period of time. By offering the free solid matte guide as an incentive, we hope our customer will upgrade to a new formula guide.”

    The new PANTONE formula guide coated/uncoated is available immediately at www.pantone.com/freeguide
    Australian customers can contact Pantone distributor Seaga at
    www.seaga.com.au
    or AE Hudson www.hudsons.com.au

  • Imatec moves into Perth

    Sydney prepress house Imatec has bought Kevin McCarthy’s well respected prepress firm Multicolour in Perth. The new business has changed its name to Imatec and joins the other four Sydney outlets of the same company.

    According to director Mike Hay, Kevin McCarthy approached the group with the object of passing over the business when he wanted to retire. The two had maintained strong bounds since hay was given his start in the business by McCarthy before subsequently leaving for Sydney.

    The company plans to add to the range of services available to the Perth printing industry. It is currently examining the viability of investing in digital printing with Hay admitting to being impressed by the new Indigo Platinum. The company already operates a Xeikon digital press in its Sydney premises where it is recognised for its expertise in variable data printing. Imatec is an eclectic enterprise that includes some print brokering in its range of activities.

    “Multicolour had a reputation for high quality prepress and we intend to build on that and be able to offer variable data printing to some of the larger printers and corporations here. We are also looking at bringing in some printing work from our Sydney locations that could be better done here.

    “Perth is a very competitive market with an over abundance of technology. The industry does not take kindly to outsiders coming in so I’m glad I can tell them I’m a Perth boy returning home,” he said.

    The Imatec move comes as reports arrive from an industry source of three of the smaller trade shops in Perth closing their doors due to the drop off in work from customers who have now adopted CTP technology.

  • Colour Solutions goes under

    Colour Solutions is the latest in a number of prepress houses that have gone to the wall as more agency customers take their production work in-house. The company is under administration by KPMG, which will certainly be seeking buyers for either or both of the locations.

    Staff report that the business is continuing to trade as usual, although founder owner James Kellet has no active role. Kellet himself said it would be inappropriate to comment at this sensitive stage of the administration.

    Colour Solutions was a pioneer in digital printing, taking the first Indigo installation in Melbourne almost eight years ago. A subsequent expansion into Sydney contributed to its financial woes. The loss of a major Melbourne advertising agency client in recent months would not have helped either.

    Industry sources consider it unlikely that a single buyer will be found for both businesses and there is considerable doubt over the ability of the enterprise to continue in its present form.

  • Finsbury Print buys AC Tod

    Andre de Waele, principal of AC Tod, will remain with the company in an operating role. There will be no redundancies among the Melbourne staff.

    A statement released by Finsbury said, as part of the arrangement, all current staff of AC Tod will be retained, as it is clear that they are an outstanding group of committed professionals and a genuine asset of the business.

    According to Peter Orel, executive director. “This is a great synergy for us. We will integrate their finance and IT structures with ours. They run Prism MIS and so do we. Apart from that we are happy to leave the people and equipment in place.”

    A major systems integration program has already commenced.

    The two companies have similar high-end markets, both concentrating on the agency/designer clientele, although Finesbury, recognised as a more technically advanced enterprise, has made the move into more general commercial printing in recent times. Both companies are mainly Heidelberg houses – a single Komori in Adelaide being the only exception.

    The purchase price remains confidential with the only indication coming from confirmation of AC Tod’s turnover of $10 million. According to the company’s statement, the power and promise of this operation signals a formidable new printing company in the Australian market.

  • PMP shuts Moorabbin printing plant

    The industrial action came as a result of PMP Print’s major restructuring, which will see the closure of its Moorabbin printing plant as well as expansion of the PMP Clayton operation.

    The Moorabbin plant will close in June 2002 and will be offered for sale in the second half of 2002. Proceeds from the sale would be used to further pay down debt.

    A total of 179 operational, administrative and support staff based at the Moorabbin plant are affected by the decision. A strike was called to demand further compensation for workers made redundant or redeployed to other locations.
    According to John Leevers, Group Managing Director of PMP Print, the dispute was settled after the company agreed to enhanced conditions outside the enterprise agreement.
    “With this kind of situation, I really can’t see the point in having these enterprise agreements,” he said.

    Despite the dispute most national magazine titles printed by PMP made their newsstand deadlines.

    Some 105 staff have been offered redeployment to other PMP Print operations in Victoria. Voluntary redundancies are limited to 74 positions. All staff seeking redundancies would receive now receive over the award entitlements as well as full outplacement counselling service and financial planning advice.

    The restructure follows a strategic review of all PMP Print operations. The company claims that PMP’s market position in the highly competitive printing industry will be enhanced by the closure and sale of the Moorabbin plant along with the redeployment of some personnel and equipment to Clayton.

    John Leevers said that while the company regretted the need for redundancies, the restructuring was necessary for the viable future of the business.

    “We will be maintaining our print capacity in Victoria and the majority of those to be redeployed will be transferred to Clayton, the largest print operation in the Southern Hemisphere, where already some 750 people are employed.”

    “PMP is the major player in the Australian print industry and we intend to maintain that position in the highly competitive industry.”

    The restructure will enable cash strapped PMP to sell a valuable but surplus real estate asset as well as get better utilisation of its printing plants. The three web presses at Moorabbin, a C70, a Rotoman and an Albert, will be relocated to the company’s other plants.

    The CEO of PMP Limited, Robert ‘Bob’ Muscat, said the restructuring would ensure maintenance and enhancement of the efficiencies and economic viability of future PMP operations.

    “We’ve examined every aspect of our operations and business and the moves we’ve announced are further consolidation of our national print focus,” he said.

  • Print 21 Online goes to IPEX via Vancouver

    Even in these days of instant communication when you can find out anything you need to know from the Net, there is still a role for trade shows. Checking out competitive products side by side, meeting the CEOs of the large suppliers and finding out their plans, eyeballing products that may not be released in our region for some time yet – this will keep me busy in Birmingham.

    If there is anything you would like to know more about, any new product or process, drop me an e-mail and I’ll make a special effort to check it out in Birmingham and include it in the bulletin. Let’s do this together. Get back to me.

    print21online.com

  • Overflow…extra news…more news…overflow…extra news…

    The first DicoPress 500 is signed for delivery in six weeks to a prepress company in Victoria, according to John Hansen, General Manager Print, Print & Pack. The sale is a much needed expression of confidence in the Xeikon-based technology following the company’s failure in recent months.
    “We are confident in the machine and the customer has confidence in our commitment to support it,” said Hansen. Print & Pack is the sole support supplier for Xeikon machines in Australia and New Zealand which to date have consisted of Xerox Docucolor 100, Agfa Chromapress and IBM 100. There are 12 Xeikon engines working in the region.

    Meanwhile…. A Belgian electronics firm, Punch International has emerged as the winner of the bidding war for the assets of Xeikon. The Belgian court decided to reject bids from MAN Roland and Yam International, Xeikon’s Russian distributor in favour of the home team.

    Punch will merge Xeikon with its ctp supplier Strobbe Graphics. It will keep the Xeikon brand name and 235 of Xeikon’s 900 staff, after a court confirmed Xeikon’s bankruptcy last Wednesday.

    The E20m takeover applies only to the Belgian Xeikon, and not subsidiaries in other countries. Punch has factories in Bruges and Ypres in Belgium and Bridgend, South Wales. Xeikon factories in Heultje, Mortsel and Lier are being retained.

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    CPI Group has announced a loss of $764,000 for the six months to 31 December 2001. Whilst operating revenues increased 3.5 per cent to $216.9 million the Group incurred one-off costs of $2.8 million in order to reduce its recurring costs by $5 million per annum. This restructure was completed in November 2001 and the full benefits are expected to flow through in the second half.

    The disappointing result represents an improvement over the six months to June once the restructuring costs are taken into account. Operating cash flows of $3 million were generated even after the one-off costs.

    Demand for machinery during the first half was buoyant with the Group claiming to have worked its way through its excess inventory accumulated as a result of the difficult previous year.

    Business conditions were little changed in the half from those that prevailed in the six months to June with margins in both the papers and imaging areas under particular pressure. There are early signs that these pressures are beginning to ease although this is not expected to materially affect the second half.

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    After almost 10 years as Chairman of CPI, AS ‘Sandy’ Murdoch is leaving with Gerry van Wyngen, previously the Managing Director of Dresdner Australia, taking his place. In addition Peter Reilly, previously Managing Director of Ausdoc Group is also joining the CPI board.

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    In what appears to be a belt-tightening time ahead new orders for MAN Roland sheetfed presses fell by 16 per cent last year. The web side of the business fared better with the company reporting a drop of five per cent. Overall new orders fell from US$1.8 billion to $1.7 billion while orders on hand dropped nine per cent from $1.2 billion to $1.1 billion.
    The company’s order books are coming off a high with last year’s sheetfed system sales of $693 million up by six per cent, while webfed sales of $749 million increased by 14 per cent, and trade and services sales of $380 million rose 24 per cent compared to full-year
    2000.

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    Agfa Monotype Corporation, a major provider of fonts and font technologies worldwide, today announced 22 new fonts that are now available exclusively from Agfa Monotype and through its Web site, www.fonts.com.

    The new fonts comprise six typeface families: Tugboat Annie, Mustang Sally, Woodley Park, Cruz Handy, Maidenhead and Haarlemer. Complete character sets of the new releases can be viewed at www.fonts.com/new.

    “These new releases reinforce our dedication to creating an exclusive typeface offering that is deep, rich and wide,” said Allan Haley, director of new typeface development at Agfa Monotype. “With a selection of over 7,000 fonts, new releases every month and live customer support, fonts.com is the most comprehensive and convenient place to shop for fonts on the Internet.”

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    What is this thing with President Bush and the printing industry? Again George W. went to a printing company to make a policy announcement, this time to The Printer,
    Des Moines, Iowa where he gave a speech on retirement security reform.
    “I came here not only because I wanted to herald the importance of small business in our society, but because this company has a good plan. A good plan is one where the company says it’s to your advantage to put as much money away as you can when you’re younger and understand the power of compounding interest rates. In other words, watching that money grow on a tax-free basis makes a lot of sense, and the workers here at The Printer, understand that.” In October, Bush visited Dixie Printing & Packaging Corporation to announce his latest economic stimulus plan for small business.

    ________________________________________________

    And finally….

    EU Directive 456179

    In order to meet the conditions for joining the Single European currency, all citizens of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland must be made aware that the phrase “Spending a penny” is not to be used after 31st December 2001.

    From this date, the correct terminology will be: “Euronating”.

    Thank you for your attention

  • Who won what – the statistics

    Admark Graphics NSW
    Silver
    Bronze

    Advance Press WA
    Silver
    Bronze

    AIW Printing VIC
    Gold

    AQ Australia SA
    Silver

    Artifact VIC
    Bronze

    Artists Proof VIC
    Gold

    Avon Graphics VIC
    Gold
    Silver x 2
    Bronze x 3

    Bambra Press VIC
    Silver x 2
    Bronze x 2

    Barossa Printmasters SA
    Silver
    Bronze

    Brite Solutions NSW
    Bronze

    Buscombe Vicprint VIC
    Silver

    Castle Printing NSW
    Silver

    Chasdor Bindery SA
    Bronze

    Collotype Labels SA
    Gold
    Silver x 2
    Bronze

    Colorcorp Image Graphics QLD
    Gold
    Silver

    Colour Solutions NSW
    Silver
    Bronze

    Colourcraft Printing VIC
    Silver

    Complete Colour Printing VIC
    Silver

    Cornerstone Press QLD
    Gold
    Silver

    Craft Printing NSW
    Gold

    Custom Group SA
    Silver

    Dalton Fine Paper NSW
    Silver

    DOIT Productions SA
    Bronze

    Edwards Dunlop Paper
    Bronze

    Ever- Redi Press NSW
    Gold
    Evolution Communications QLD
    Silver

    Fast Proof Press QLD
    Silver

    Fergies QLD
    Bronze

    Fine Art Graphics VIC
    Silver

    Finsbury Print SA
    Gold
    Bronze

    Flexipack QLD
    Bronze

    Frank Daniels WA
    Gold
    Silver
    Bronze x 2

    Graphic Skills Sunshine Coast QLD
    Gold
    Silver

    Hannanprint NSW
    Gold x 2
    Silver
    Bronze x 2

    Hannanprint VIC
    Silver x 3
    Bronze

    Impress Printers NSW
    Gold
    Silver x 2
    Bronze x 2

    Inpack QLD
    Silver

    Inprint QLD
    Gold x 5
    Silver x 4
    Bronze x 4

    JM Executive Printing Services NSW
    Bronze

    John Herrod & Associates VIC
    Silver
    Bronze

    Johns Screen Centre SA
    Silver

    Labelmakers VIC
    Silver

    Lane Print Group SA
    Bronze

    Lamb Printers WA
    Silver x 2
    Bronze

    Lilyfield Printing NSW
    Gold

    Lindsay Yates & Partners NSW
    Bronze x 2
    MacDonald & Masterson NSW
    Bronze x 2

    Manark Printing VIC
    Gold x 2
    Silver x 2
    Bronze

    McPhersons Printing Group VIC
    Silver x 2
    Bronze x 2

    Megara VIC
    Bronze

    Milton Reed Screen Process Printers SA
    Bronze

    New Litho VIC
    Bronze

    New Milligans VIC
    Silver

    Ocean Digital Printers QLD
    Bronze

    Offset Alpine Printing NSW
    Gold
    Silver x 2
    Bronze x 4

    Pacmetal Services VIC
    Bronze

    Paragon Printers NSW
    Silver

    Patterson York Press VIC
    Silver

    PCC Graphics NSW
    Silver

    Pep Central QLD
    Bronze

    Placard VIC
    Gold

    Platypus Graphics QLD
    Bronze x 2

    PMP Print NSW
    Gold

    PMP Print VIC
    Gold x 2
    Silver x 2
    Bronze

    PMP Print Clayton VIC
    Silver x 2
    Bronze

    PMP Print Moorabbin VIC
    Gold
    Silver
    Bronze x 4

    Precision Labels VIC
    Bronze x 2

    Print Works QLD
    Bronze

    Print-X Digital SA
    Silver
    Bronze

    RA Printing VIC
    Silver

    Riverstone Printing NSW
    Silver

    Rodenprint NSW
    Gold
    Silver

    Rodney M Poole VIC
    Silver

    Rodney Robertson & Associates SA
    Gold
    Bronze x 2

    RT Kelly NSW
    Gold
    Bronze

    Screen Offset Printing QLD
    Bronze

    Scott Print WA
    Gold x 2
    Bronze x 2

    Show-Ads VIC
    Gold
    Bronze

    Sinclair/ Lee QLD
    Silver

    SNP Ausprint VIC
    Silver
    Bronze x 2

    Southern Colour VIC
    Gold

    Spectra Litho VIC
    Gold
    Bronze x 2

    STS Creative Printing VIC
    Silver x 2

    Sunne Printing Services NSW
    Bronze

    The Pot Still Press NSW
    Silver

    Toth Bienk & Associates VIC
    Silver

    Van Gastel Printing SA
    Gold
    Silver
    Bronze x 3

    Vega Press VIC
    Bronze x 2

    Veritage Press VIC
    Bronze

    Viper Graphics QLD
    Gold x 2
    Silver
    Bronze x 2

    Visy Preprint VIC
    Gold, Silver, Bronze

    Visyflex Preprint VIC
    Silver

    Wendor Printing QLD
    Silver

    WYSIWYG Design NSW
    Bronze

  • 1st Apprentice printer to be awarded at NPA

    Tom Englesman with Paul Drury at Darling Harbour

    Tom Englesman, general manager of Australian Paper in making the presentation, paid tribute to the young winner from the Queensland School of Printing. “The industry needs to look to its future with the encouragement of young people such as Paul. Australian Paper is pleased to be able to assist in giving recognition to young people starting out,” he said.

    Paul Drury confessed to being in the dark about printing until he returned to his education after leaving school early. His prize-winning piece was a promotional advertisement for Oxfam. He expressed an ambition to one day own his own printing business.

    Previously the Australian Paper Award was given to the design student who designed the Print Awards poster.

  • Show-Ads self promotion takes out the Agfa Award

    Garry Muratore with Giles Kershaw, Senior
    Designer,

    Moon Design, Agfa Award winner.

    The prize was presented by Garry Muratore, Marketing Manager of Agfa Graphics systems, who emphasized that the selection criteria was not simply looking for the best reproduction of photography. “In that case a photographic book would win every year,” he said. “Rather the Agfa Award is for the most creative use of photography in print.”

    The wining piece is a panorama several metres long printed on board that was commissioned by Show Ads to illustrate to its customers the deadline pressures that accompanies print production. The often obliquely cropped images are designed to convey a sense of the urgency that is often found in the process.

  • Two share the Heidelberg Prize for Excellence

    Adam Tedman from Viper Graphics with Andy vels Jensen,
    Managing Director of Heidelberg Australia.

    Viper Graphics also won two gold medals for its entry, a multi-part promotional piece for a real estate company in Brisbane – one in the category of a small printing business of up to four staff of which the judges said, Great craftsmanship from a small printer. A large printer would be proud of this result.

    It also won the prize for Multi-Piece Productions for the same piece with the juges commenting, Consistent quality over many elements to produce an extremely good result. Stands above the rest.

    PMP Print Vic made it two in a row with its entry of the Cockatoo Folio, a limited edition from Nokomis Publications. The same team won the Heidelberg Award last year for The Banksias.

    The judges termed Cockatoos as a true demonstration of the printer’s craft. A classic limited edition. A joy to behold.

    It was noted at the awards that the two companies are at the opposite ends of the industry in size, but share a common commitment to great printing craftsmanship.

  • Al Curman is Graphic Arts Person of the Year

    He was introduced by Sid Thompson as a person whose, resilience, determination, skill and contribution to our industry makes him a more than worthy Graphic Arts Person of the Year 2002.

    Al Curman (pictured) worked in the Australian industry shortly from after he landed at the Bonegilla migrant camp in Victoria. After hitchhiking to Sydney, Al, looked up Offset Printers and Lithographers in the (then) pink pages, and met Jack Benyon at John Sands & Co. Jack was interested enough in Al’s folder of four colour prints to find an interpreter, interview Al and employ him as a colour retoucher.

    At the time, John Sands was printing with 12 or more colours, Al could achieve the same result with just four colours. After 18 months with John Sands, Al moved on to Varden Price in Adelaide and two years later to P. G Grosser (Leigh Mardon) as foreman of the Litho Department.

    Back in Sydney, 1969, Al became a partner in a new business venture, Associated Lithographers. In 1979, he started his own company, Curman Lithographics and moved into digital lithography via pagination systems and scanners. He worked in the company until he retired in 1989.

    Al was a pioneer in four-colour lithography in Australia, playing a seminal role in the transformation of lithographic reproduction from being labour intensive to one that uses advances in technology as they are developed.

  • Inprint Queensland sweeps the board

    The interstate rivalry that is a feature of the National Print Awards was given a twist this year after Potstill Press, which is the second most awarded company over the years, only picked up a silver this time around. The company was in the throes of being bought by Websdale Printing at the time of nominations.

    A total of 38 gold, 63 silver, 79 bronze and 92 certificates were shared between 94 winners. There were 35 categories, although no gold medals were given for security printing or web flexo.

    Bill Hicks, chairman of judges, appealed to company’s to take just a little more care, in the presentation and finishing of their entrants. Simple, silly and careless errors made the judging a more straightforward process than it should have been. Many excellent overall entries exhibited minor faults, which marked them down from major winners and unwittingly made the judging quite simple, he wrote in the catalogue.

    The turnout at Darling Harbour on Wednesday, March 6 was down on previous years, but as usual, a good time appeared to be had by all at what are often referred to as the printing industry Oscar’s.