Archive for November, 2008

  • Fuji Xerox Australia launches the Xerox iGen4

    New Xerox Colour Press Delivers Breakthrough Image Quality; Drives More Profitability from Digital Printing

    Fuji Xerox Australia has unveiled the Xerox iGen4(tm), regarded as the most productive and highest-quality cut-sheet digital press in the printing industry.

    "Building on our hugely successful Xerox iGen3, the industry’s leading high-speed digital colour press, this next generation Xerox iGen4 delivers colour quality and automation that redefine the standards of printing," said Henryk Kraszewski, (pictured) the Colour Production Marketing Manager at Fuji Xerox Australia.

    The Xerox iGen4 increases productivity by automating operator tasks, reducing the need to interrupt the press for adjustments and decreasing overall operating costs. As a result, the Xerox iGen4 improves the break-even point between digital and traditional offset printing – making it faster and more economical to print jobs on digital.

    New components with the Xerox iGen4
    Auto Density Control – Patented technology that uses a full-width sensor array to automatically detect and eliminate density variations and streaks, while the press is running. Streaks are inherent in most printing processes and often require operator intervention or a service call to resolve. With this new component, streaks are eliminated and the Xerox iGen4 remains in production.

    Carrier Dispensing System – New method of combining dry ink and carrier – in place of traditional developer – that yields consistent colour uniformity from the first print to the last and from job to job. With the Carrier Dispensing System, operators no longer have to stop the machine and change the developer.

    High Definition Linearisation – Patented process that eliminates time-consuming gray-scale calibration, resulting in better production of neutral greys and highlight shadows. It also improves photo smoothness, especially in faces, while maintaining sharp background details. High Definition Linearisation ensures greater colour stability from job-to-job and machine-to-machine.

    Advanced Colour Profiling – Innovation that enables greater colour consistency and realism in objects such as faces and skies. This tool automatically adjusts colours to closely match offset printing standards in minutes. It can accurately match the popular GRACoL (General Requirements for Applications in Commercial Offset Lithography) standard, and takes advantage of ICC (International Colour Consortium) DeviceLink Profiling for higher performance. A colour matching industry benchmark, GRACoL offers a new source profile option for the most demanding jobs. The ICC DeviceLink Profiling allows for faster processing and improved colour rendering.

    High-speed Inline Spectrophotometer – Right in the paper path, the high-speed Inline Spectrophotometer automatically creates colour samples on target sheets, registers them for accuracy and processes the data – all at the rated speed of the Xerox iGen4 – and takes the appropriate action to adjust the press. The results are offset and photo image quality along with spot colour accuracy.

    Xerox iGen4 specifications
    The Xerox iGen4 press runs at 110 pages per minute and includes these industry-leading features:
    * largest sheet size (364mm x 571mm) of any digital colour press
    * broadest array of inline finishing options
    * widest range of substrate latitude
    * greatest number of stocks in a single collated job (up to 12)
    * total paper capacity of up to 80,000 sheets

    Designed to help print providers reduce their environmental footprint, the Xerox iGen4 uses dry inks that are non-toxic and minimise waste. More than 97 percent of its components are recyclable or remanufacturable.

  • Océ ColorWave keeps Creffield Digital Print on a roll

    Australia’s first installation of the Océ ColorWave 600 makes a splash at Creffield Digital Print.

    Staff from the 120-year-old Melbourne-based printing company first caught sight of the ColorWave 600 overseas earlier this year. After seeing the press again at Visual Impact trade show, the sale was finalised.

    Frank Veltman (pictured), managing director of Creffield said that the new system fitted in well with the company’s future plans.

    "It’s great technology that enables Creffield to seek out new markets," he said.

    Visual Impact was key to promoting and rolling out the ColorWave 600. According to Paul Whitehead, marketing manager at Océ, five other ColorWave 600 systems are due for delivery throughout Australia in the next few months.

    "The expo gave us the opportunity to showcase the new technology in advance," Whitehead said.

    For Veltman, Creffield now has the ability to woo government customers and maintain a presence in the retail and entertainment markets.

    "We now have a substantial customer base in retail and environment," he said. "This gives them the ability to produce promotional materials for sales or events at extremely short notice. We can also produce exceptional quality for government customers who demand work on recycled stocks."

  • Welcome to the wood wars: Print 21 magazine article

    The battle to protect the planet’s forests often gets bogged down in a contest between competing organisations over who is best qualified to undertake such a role. Long-time industry commentator, Phillip Lawrence, presents a short history of forest certification.

    The first recorded attempt to trace wood used for production was in Europe, a French Royal decree of 1637, which stipulated that members of the guild of cabinet makers had to mark the furniture they made so that the wood used could be confirmed as being sourced from France’s own forests.

    Trees, wood and forestry came to our generation’s attention in the 1970s with the notion that acid rain was killing forests so rapidly that some iconic forests in Europe and North America were certain to be wiped out in a short space of time. The second issue in the late 1980s was where tropical forests were being cleared extremely rapidly, mostly by fire, to plant food crops and also for cattle grazing lands. The most notable example of land clearing was in Brazil where the demand for hamburger meat in the western world meant vast tracts of land were being cleared using fire in order that cattle could graze. The rate of forest clearing reached almost unbelievable dimensions. The concept that trees, forests and wood were being used to make products was not the issue that drove the need of forestry certifications at that stage.

    The first mention of forests in regard to some need to address the potential loss of forestry lands was in a G7/G8 communiqué at the 1987 Venice summit, which noted the need to halt tropical deforestation. In 1989 the Paris summit gave its support for the Tropical Forestry Action Plan. A few years later, in 1992, the International Tropical Timber Organization was started as a group to set standards and control how tropical timber resources were being harvested and used around the world. The focus on tropical timber resources identified that timber was being harvested in many places around the world, not just in the tropics, but also in the cold northern, boreal forest areas of the world.

    As a result, the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) was formed in 1993 with most impetus coming from the World Wildlife Fund (WWF). The FSC mostly wanted to address issues that related to the impact on forestry life in the event that trees are harvested. It created a strong criterion for harvesting methodology which would greatly reduce the impact that forestry had on the land and the creatures that lived there. They gave particular attention to waterways in their list of forest management controls.

    A common identity
    Many people, particularly those in the wood products industry, were very concerned in the early 1990s with a group dominated by environmental groups such as WWF. The controls and requirements that were put on the industry by FSC were rigorous and these controls covered forestry issues as well as social matters such as addressing bio-diversity and local populations. In response, a number of industry bodies were set up to create their own versions of a forestry certification. On June 30 1999, the Pan European Forest Certification (PEFC) organisation was formed in order to bring the many different groups that had individually set up their own ‘codes of conduct’ under one umbrella organisation that could present a common identity label to the buyer of timber products and also to the general public.

    PEFC is not a single forestry certification like FSC; PEFC is a controlling body that investigates individual certifications or forestry codes of conduct and then determines if they are achieving a certain level of rigour. So if a forestry certification is quoting a PEFC acceptance it is considered to be a thorough forestry certification that addresses harvesting, bio-diversity and local population issues.

    As PEFC gained more acceptances, particularly in its home base of Europe, the FSC group became concerned that their rigorous standards were not being equalled by PEFC and so the market was accepting an inferior forestry standard. At almost every opportunity, FSC focused attention on attacking anyone in the market who certified their products with anything other than FSC. These actions propelled the idea that FSC was in fact just another militant NGO wanting only to stop industrial progress rather than having a real concern about protecting forestry.

    Raising the bar
    However, another view is that the aggressive action of FSC against PEFC in particular has raised the performance of PEFC. This is because PEFC has not responded aggressively to FSC’s attacks but rather inwardly reviewed its own values and standards. Many organisations that have used PEFC have been frustrated by the apparent lack of market retaliation by PEFC against FSC. However, some academic studies have noted that the competition between the two has raised the standard of overall forestry certifications.

    PEFC changed its name after about five years of operation to Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification to reflect the worldwide acceptance of its work. PEFC has more area of forestry land under its certification compared to that of FSC. There have been a number of studies carried out documenting the battle that has taken place with FSC attacking the values of PEFC. For the most part, PEFC has been reluctant to engage in a public fight with FSC on which of the two certifications is the better; rather PEFC has preferred to say that both certifications could exist in the market because they are equal.

    Unfortunately the inter-certification attention has diluted the original goals of forestry certification. In the first instance, back in the early 90s, the great concern everyone had was on protecting tropical forestry; the fact is that only about 4 percent of certified forestry is located in tropical regions of the world.

  • Horizon perfect binder delivers a home run for Graphic Impressions

    Melbourne-based company, Graphic Impressions, declares independence by installing a Horizon perfect binder, CABS 5000 and bringing all its work back in-house.

    For the last six-and-a-half years, Graphic Impressions, has been responsible for printing over 30 magazines for 12 different publishers. Some of the magazines are their own as the company operates across the different disciplines of printing and publishing. The joint venture between managing director, Tony Callahan and director, Silvio Morelli, began as a way of fusing the two men’s complementary  backgrounds in printing and publishing.

    "We realised that we could start a business together given my involvement with printing and Silvio’s portfolio of magazines," Callahan (pictured) said.

    With many of their own titles growing in the number of pages per issue the demand for perfect binding increased. Callahan also took note of an increasing number of titles previously printed overseas, coming back home.

    "Over the last three months I have noticed a lot more Australian magazines that were produced overseas have now returned back to Australia," he said. "All of a sudden there is more value-add to having a product completed in-house rather than relying on outsourced suppliers."

    The prospect of doing all the bindery themselves began to loom large for Callahan and Morelli, but it wasn’t until they met with the Currie Group’s Bernie Robinson that this vision quickly began to transform itself into a reality. Robinson, consulted with them about what Graphic Impressions needed to move into perfect binding and suggested the Horizon CABS 5000.

    "In terms of quality, what the Currie Group had far outweighed anything else I had seen," Callahan said.

    The CABS 5000 consists of a six-hopper gatherer, a 15-clamp perfect binder and a three-knife trimmer. The system has the latest in sophisticated automated set-up functions and a production speed capable of handling 5,200 books-per-hour. Complementing the Horizon system is the computerized cross folder, equipped with six buckles and two cross knives.

    "Our commitment to Graphic Impressions was about finding and providing them with equipment that is not only easy to use, but would also save them money," Robinson said.

    Pictured: (L-R) Bernie Robinson, sales director; Mr Yasushi Matsuhara, director, export division and Tony Callahan, managing director of Graphic Impressions.

    On his trip to Australia, director of Horizon’s export division, Mr Yasushi Matsuhara, called in to Graphic Impressions to meet the team and offer training and assistance with the machine.

    He noted that in Japan, there have already been 30 installations of the CABS 5000, with more expected to follow.

    "We are putting Horizon binding systems in more and more printing companies that have always outsourced and never worked with bindery systems before," Mr Matsuhara explained.

    The Horizon also requires less manpower on the factory floors. Originally, Callahan planned that he would need five staff on the CABS 5000, but the automation has made it possible for him to run it with only a team of four.

    Feedback from the staff has been glowing, he said. "They have never seen automation like it before and the intelligence has made things very easy for them."

    Most of all, Callahan says, the CABS 5000 has given his company greater independence and freedom to move forwards.

    "Our destiny is now in our own hands," he said.

  • Suppliers throw their support behind PacPrint

    Suppliers and organisers speak back to suggestions that PacPrint 09 be closed down.

    With the growing financial crisis taking its toll on businesses worldwide, some members of the printing industry began to question the relevance of holding or attending the five-day trade show next year.

    PacPrint 09 chairman, Alastair Hadley, acknowledged that there had been questions directed to him about where the show was going. "People are looking at their costs and how they can do things better," he said.

    For some, this has meant cutting back the size of their stands, while others intend on increasing their presence at the show. One supplier remained optimistic and considers the show valuable to its longevity.

    "We don’t expect too many sales to be signed at the show, but it is important to maintain confidence in the industry and prepare for when the cycle turns," he said.

    Hadley said there was no intention of cancelling PacPrint or shortening the duration of the show.

    "We’ve got more exhibitors than in 2005 which is interesting considering the amount of mergers and acquisitions in the industry," he said. Last week it was announced that 300 exhibitors are expected to take part in the show.

    Hadley noted that the industry’s larges players such as Heidelberg, Fuji Xerox, Currie Group, Muller Martini and GBC were among the first to finalise their involvement in the show, later followed by a flurry of smaller companies and newcomers keen to get onboard.

    "PacPrint will happen and it will be a good show regardless," Hadley said.

  • New offset hub comes to Sydney

    2009 is looking to be a tough year for printers, but there has never been a better time to join a hub, according to Kerim El Gabaili, coordinator of Sydney’s new offset printing collective.

    Based in Auburn, the hub  –  which is expected to open in March next year  – has been in the making for over a year now. As former chairman of Co-operative Sydney Digital Print (CDP) which opened in September 2006, El Gabaili saw the potential to roll out the same business model again.

    "The digital hub was a perfect case study of how this can work," he said.

    The new hub is located on the same block as CDP so that both groups can compliment the other and take care of customer’s work in both offset and digital. While El Gabaili (pictured) will focus on establishing the offset hub, Trevor Boreham of Inform Print has taken on the role of chairman for CDP.

    One of the advantages of being part of a hub is that it allows members access to the latest equipment so that they can in turn compete with the larger companies.

    "This is a great opportunity for smaller printers to come together, work collectively and be more efficient than the big printers," El Gabaili said.

    One Sydney company, Prografica, has already joined while El Gabaili is in discussions with five other companies. He aims to attract eight to 10 companies all up, who do not necessarily need to be located in Sydney.

    "It would suit Melbourne-based printers who have clients in Sydney," he said.

    Once members have been selected, the second phase of the hub’s rollout will be finding and installing the best equipment which can complement the work each company does. El Gabaili is expecting to purchase two 2-colour and one 5-colour press.

    A firm believer in the value of teamwork and collaboration, El Gabaili lists these traits as vital to the success of a hub.

    "The fundamental key is having good leadership and good people who are willing to change their thinking to focus on ‘what’s in it for the group’, not ‘what’s in it for me’," he said.

    El Gabaili is well aware of the changing economic landscape and the impacts that this will have on the printing industry. These reasons made opening another hub all the more compelling; for him it is a way of surviving and staying strong.

    "The big players are all merging to create more efficiencies," he said. "This is an opportunity to do the same at the smaller end of town."

    Interested parties can contact Kerim El Gabaili about the offset print hub on 9564 3212 or 0412 442 217, or email kerim@prografica.com.au

  • Body of Work 1:1 magazine bursts into life

    Larger than life Australian magazine, Body of Work 1:1, entered into Guinness Book of Records.

    Bigger is better when it comes to magazines, says Bob Armstrong of Armstrong Miller + McLaren. The photographer, who was responsible for producing the 1×2 metre magazine wanted a way of grabbing people’s attention and he found the answer was size.

    "Body of Work 1:1 was designed for corporations and wealthy people who want to make a statement and this is a different way of doing that," he said.

    Only one copy of Body of Work 1:1 exists, though McLaren is happy to print more for those wanting to buy it. The magazine took two weeks to produce, which included being printed on a HP press and then bound.

    Armstrong believes that Body of Work 1:1 is the largest magazine in the world and plans on entering it into the Guinness Book of Records. He notes that it is interactive and engaging.

    "When you put a painting up it’s just a painting on the wall, but Body of Work 1:1 is a cover and 20 pages," he said. "This isn’t a coffee table book; it’s a coffee table."

    At a time when magazine circulation is plummeting and many people are looking to the internet, Armstrong reckons that the trick is to made print do what online media cannot.

    "All the magazines we design can’t go on the web," he said. "People have tried to make online versions of Body of Work, but that’s not what the magazine is made for."

    Body of Work 1:1 is currently showing at The Menzies Hotel, 14 Carrington Street Sydney and will make its way across Australia.

  • Horizon delivers a home run for Graphic Impressions

    Melbourne-based company, Graphic Impressions, declares independence by installing a Horizon perfect binder, CABS 5000 and bringing all its work back in-house.

    For the last six-and-a-half years, Graphic Impressions, has been responsible for printing over 30 magazines for 12 different publishers. Some of the magazines are their own as the company operates across the different disciplines of printing and publishing. The joint venture between managing director, Tony Callahan and director, Silvio Morelli, began as a way of fusing the two men’s complementary  backgrounds in printing and publishing.

    "We realised that we could start a business together given my involvement with printing and Silvio’s portfolio of magazines," Callahan (pictured) said.

    With many of their own titles growing in the number of pages per issue the demand for perfect binding increased. Callahan also took note of an increasing number of titles previously printed overseas, coming back home.

    "Over the last three months I have noticed a lot more Australian magazines that were produced overseas have now returned back to Australia," he said. "All of a sudden there is more value-add to having a product completed in-house rather than relying on outsourced suppliers."

    The prospect of doing all the bindery themselves began to loom large for Callahan and Morelli, but it wasn’t until they met with the Currie Group’s Bernie Robinson that this vision quickly began to transform itself into a reality. Robinson, consulted with them about what Graphic Impressions needed to move into perfect binding and suggested the Horizon CABS 5000.

    "In terms of quality, what the Currie Group had far outweighed anything else I had seen," Callahan said.

    The CABS 5000 consists of an 18-hopper gatherer, a 15-clamp perfect binder and a three-knife trimmer. The system has the latest in sophisticated automated set-up functions and a production speed capable of handling 5,200 books-per-hour. Complementing the Horizon system is the computerized cross folder, equipped with six buckles and two cross knives.

    "Our commitment to Graphic Impressions was about finding and providing them with equipment that is not only easy to use, but would also save them money," Robinson said.

    Pictured: (L-R) Bernie Robinson, sales director; with Horizon’s Mr Yasushi Matsuhara, director, export division, Japan and Tony Callahan, managing director of Graphic Impressions.

    The Horizon also requires less manpower on the factory floors. Originally, Callahan planned that he would need five staff on the CABS 5000, but the automation has made it possible for him to run it with only a team of four.

    Feedback from the staff has been glowing, he said. "They have never seen automation like it before and the intelligence has made things very easy for them."

    Most of all, Callahan says, the CABS 5000 has given his company greater independence and freedom to move forwards.

    "Our destiny is now in our own hands," he said.

  • HPA key to Salmat growth

    Salmat’s acquisition of HPA begins to pay off for the company, increasing its revenue by 35 per cent.

    The purchase, which took place in November 2007 was widely hailed by Salmat’s executives during last week’s annual general meeting.

    "HPA resulted in Salmat recording its highest ever turnover with revenue increasing 35 per cent to $812 million," said Richard Lee, chairman.

    While Salmat’s earnings for the year were originally up 22.6 per cent to $57.6 million, the impact of significant items, namely costs related to the launch of Lasoo and HPA, brought the final result back to $44.1 million.

    Joint managing director, Peter Mattick, said that HPA helped boost BusinessForce’s revenue along with the growth of laser print volumes. Changes to the BusinessForce division also meant that some PrintZoo sites and Perth and Canberra branches were quickly merged, with more to follow in Brisbane and Adelaide.

    "This [HPA] integration involved brining together around 2000 staff across more than 15 sites to form one cohesive group," Mattick said.

    "We are almost half way through the integration program and remain on track to meet our internal deadline of completion by the end of calendar 2009."

    HPA will be the main focus for Salmat in the coming year, where its real benefits are expected to come into fruition. "We are excited about the opportunities for additional revenue and synergy cost savings from what is now Salmat’s largest division," Lee said.

    Beyond Australia, Salmat also entered into a new venture with New Zealand Post, covering the distribution of unaddressed mail in New Zealand. The business is still finding its feet, according to Mattick, and he expects "significant improvement" over the next two years.

    It is also the end of an era for the company as join managing directors Philip Salter and Mattick phase out of the daily runnings, handing over the reins to new-comer, Grant Harrod.

    "We believe that this arrangement will enable Salmat to enjoy continued access to the valuable corporate knowledge of Salmat’s founders while at the same time benefiting from the fresh new leadership of Harrod," chairman Lee said.

    Looking to the future, the company expects increased market stability with pricing returning to "more realistic levels" in the coming months. For now, Salmat will focus on the completion of its BusinessForce integration program, promoting its service offering across the group-wide client base, reducing debt and pursuing organic business growth.

    Unperturbed by economic uncertainty, Mattick also added that Salmat expects "a good half-year result and remain comfortable with a forecast of $75-80 million for the full year."

  • Australia still an emerging market for Adobe

    Adobe’s senior vice president, John Loiacono, calls in on Australia to promote Creative Suite 4.

    Loiacono, (pictured) who is responsible for the creative solutions business unit under which CS4 was launched, was heavily involved in the creation of the new software and was impressed by feedback from the locals.

    "The reviews from the press, analysts and customers have all been positive," he said.

    He sees Australia as "an emerging market and growth area" for Adobe. After meeting with media and government organisations, Loiacono hopes that the take up of Adobe in Australia will increase.

    Prior to its release there was much talk throughout industry circles that CS4 was merely an "update" and not a new product in its own right. Loiacono is pleased to discover that attitudes have since changed.

    "People now realise that it is a full-blown release that is packed with new features," he said.

    Loiacono sees Adobe’s involvement with internet as vital to its future. He points towards new CS4 features such as web conferencing and In Context Editing (ICE) as vital to connecting Adobe users with others.

    The release of Creative Suite 4 coincides not only with a tense economy, but also the release of rival software, Quark Version 8. Loiacono, however, is not particularly swayed by either factors.

    "Everyone recognises that they have budget constraints and need to control their spending," he said. "But I’ve spoken with a number of agencies who told me that if they could only update one application it would be Creative Suite."

    Loiacono was unable to discuss or reveal sales figures for Creative Suite 4. Of Quark, he is similarly optimistic.

    "We still run into some Quark users," he admitted. "They are competition that we take very seriously – but Adobe’s Creative Suite remains popular with users and we are confident with the product we have."

  • In breach of contract: Print 21 magazine article

    A recent court case involving a disputed print job has some important lessons about when a customer is allowed to break a contract to print. Wal Abramowicz has the details.

    On the 5 August 2008, the Local Court of New South Wales handed down a decision in a printing case.

    The background facts were that the customer was an importer of high priced clothing. The customer had engaged the printer to print a catalogue. The agreement comprised various emails between the parties and conversations. The printer provided a quote that was accepted and the customer provided a DVD and CD containing images to be used in the catalogue. Various proofs were produced by the printer and various changes were made by the customer. Ultimately an inkjet proof was produced and it was approved and signed by the customer. The person who approved the proof on behalf of the customer left for overseas and was overseas when the printing work was done.

    About a quarter of the catalogues were delivered to the customer who contacted the printer advising that the job was not acceptable. The customer made a number of complaints. These were rejected by the printer. The printer attempted to deliver the balance of the catalogues but delivery was refused.

    The complaint
    The customer complained that the catalogues had a number of faults including inferior resolution of the photographic imagery, scuffing on the images, inferior stitching causing damage to images, inadequate cropping and poor page alignment. They also claimed that the catalogues were not in accordance with printing industry standards.

    As a result of those complaints the customer argued that it was entitled to terminate the agreement and that it was not liable to pay the printer. Furthermore, the customer entered into a new contract with another printer to produce the catalogues and it claimed the costs of that printing work.

    During the course of discussions between the parties prior to the acceptance of the quote, the customer had handed the printer a sample of a previous catalogue and requested that the new catalogue be the same as the sample provided.

    What the court had to determine

    The hearing occupied two days of Court time. The main legal issue in the case was whether or not the customer was entitled to terminate the agreement and, in that regard, it needed to consider the following issues:

    * Was the phrase "same as sample" an essential obligation or condition of the agreement or not?
    * Did the flaws found in the catalogues produced by printer constitute a breach of an essential term and therefore a breach of the contract, or justify termination as they were sufficiently serious?

    What the court found was that, in this case, there was no express or explicit agreement between the parties that the term "same as sample" was essential. In fact, during cross examination, one of the customer’s witnesses conceded that the sample catalogue that was provided to the printer had itself a number of flaws.

    The Court noted that even though the customer submitted that the catalogues printed by printer were not in accordance with or did not meet printing industry standards, no independent expert evidence was called by customer in relation to that issue. The onus of proving this issue was upon the customer to satisfy the Court on a balance of probabilities. The customer failed to do that. There was no evidence at all that the catalogues produced by the printer were less than the industry standard. Further, the Court found that although a number of flaws were referred to during the evidence, many of those flaws were trivial.

    The customer argued that there was a breach of an essential term of the contract which permitted it to terminate the contract and not pay for the printing. The Court held that there was no such breach. As a result the customer had wrongfully terminated the contract and was liable to pay printer the cost of printing the catalogues. It also ordered that the customer pay the legal costs of the proceedings to the printer.

    What lessons can be learned?
    A number of lessons can be drawn from the outcome of this case:
    * In negotiating an agreement reduce all the terms to writing.
    * If some of the terms are so essential that any breach of them would allow you to bring the agreement to an end, state that they are essential terms in the agreement.
    * If the quality of the printing work is an important issue then make arrangements for a representative of the client to be present at the time that the job is being printed.
    * If you find yourself arguing a matter before the Court, consider engaging an expert to give an opinion relating to the complaints of the printed article.

  • Letters, feedback, get it off your chest: 26 November 2008

    Readers have their say over recent news.

    Re: Busy presses allow PMP to knock back low-margin work

    Congratulations to PMP on their apparent "testicular fortitude". Whatever the facts; perhaps if there were more "declining" of work due to low prices supposedly being offered by competitors (and how often to we see actual proof of those prices), the local printing industry may be in a better and more profitable position.
     
    John Horsley
    Expression Printing Group Pty Ltd

    ***********

    Re: Kodak chases counterfeiting crooks

    I read with interest your article on colour shifting inks. Kodak’s Traceless has been around for quite a few years but seems to be prohibited by the expensive readers and proprietory consumable. I understand that Merck KGaA supply the inks and that the reader is there just to authenticate. It seems that these technologies are searching for a problem and market rather than the other way around!
     
    It is also interesting that this product is not marketed in the world’s largest counterfeight geographical area – China. Why would you not market a product into the largest market with the greatest potential, is this because it is not secure or more expensive to implement than the product it is trying to protect? In a year when China has suffered terribly with problems in the dairy food chain I would have thought this would be a good opportunity if the product can stand up?
     
    In my experience security solutions mainly have to be overt (look at bank notes!), if tag and trace is to be a success then it has to be cost effective in the consumables and in the decoder. So far, either thermocratic inks (a little bit expensive on the consumables) with a cheaper decoder (typically your thumb!) or, optical decoders with standard inks will be the future of tag and trace technologies.
     
    Dr. Chin TuFat [sic]

    ***********
     

    Re: NSW Premier pushes print aside for online advertising 

    I think that the Premier is missing the point – older Australians are more likely to read a paper – printed material. How is he going to do his on-line advertising ? Where will people find it? Will they have to go to websites of that particular body?

    Fiona Brackenbury

     

    ***********

    Re: Lindsay Yates woos big city clients with rebranding

    It’s as if fate prepared the page-layout for this week’s Pint21online – neatly juxtaposed like Ying and Yang, were two good news/bad news stories.

    The "bad" one was the NSW Government’s edict to reduce print advertising in favour of on-line.

    The "good" one was the story about Lindsay Yates taking a pro-active initiative, and projecting themselves out into the marketplace, in a rare example of self-promotion.

    Rare, in the sense that as an industry we’ve never had to do much in the way of marketing. It would be very interesting to try and recall what have been some of the big, self-promotional events staged by printing companies over the last decade? Certainly Lilyfield’s ground-breaking effort to mark their move "out to the sticks" was an epochal event, as was Rapid Digital’s extraordinary "smoke and mirrors" event to mark their acquisition of not one, but two huge digital devices.

    These events don’t just happen and aren’t cheap (feeding a bunch of hungry/thirsty inebriates is never going to be a cheap exercise), but not only do they promote the individual company, these events also send a signal out to the business community that printing is alive and well, and "out there".

    Let companies be encouraged to undertake these events. How? Through the print awards of course!

    We already have a category called "Self-Promotion" – why restrict it to purely the printed page? Why not think laterally and reward "good behaviour", ie, self-promoting events which elevate the profile of the entire printing industry?

    We move in exciting times – we have to keep up, and staging such events is very much part of that process. Well done.

    James Cryer

    ***********

    Re: Offset Alpine achieves ISO certification

    This article is hardly newsworthy. Webstar have been ISO 12647-2 accredited for some months now (through Printspec), and although it is good to see OAP keeping up with industry developments, I would have thought an article explaining where the industry is at with ISO implementation and the benefits for printers, publishers and clients would be of greater interest.

    Mark Rolls
    Webstar Print

  • WorldWide OnLine Printing franchise for sale. Northern Suburbs of Melbourne.

    Priced well below a Greenfield (new) site.

    Join one of Australia’s top ranked* design and print franchise systems as a franchisee. Ideal for:

    – A smaller printer, not wanting to invest in more technology, but still wanting access to it. For them to focus on the design aspect and servicing customers / growing sales
    – A designer wanting to establish a larger business, and earn more from their print they outsource
    – A print salesperson wanting to establish their own business, but with the support of a leading design and print franchise

    This store was opened in 2007, and having posted sales of $240,000 in FY08 (Jul 08 to end June 08), is now at around break even. Not a bad performance from a start up, with little active external marketing effort.

    This business provides a great opportunity for the purchaser to leverage of the hard work done in the first year, at close to half of the original purchase price.

    Other major features include:
    – a very high profile Hume Highway position
    – flexible rental arrangements on premises and equipment
    – the possibility of sharing staff from the vendor’s other business
    – the option to purchase two adjoining territories ($60,000 each)

    Purchase Price $120,000 plus SAV – excellent value compared to a Greenfield (start up) price of over $200,000. Valid reason for sale.

    Phone Ascent Partners, Richard Rasmussen on 1300 88 78 48 or 0402 021 101

    *In a recent poll on franchisee satisfaction, WorldWide OnLine Printing were recently ranked 10th – see www.topfranchise.com.au survey, and are proud to be Australia’s fastest growing design and printing franchise group (BRW 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007)

  • Lindsay Yates woos big city clients with rebranding

    Upping the standard in printer’s promotion, the high-profile Sydney printer lashes out with upmarket reception.

    Determined to change the market’s perception of the company as solely a provider of printing, the principals of Artarmon-based Lindsay Yates, spent two years working on a rebranding campaign. Based on the concept of being a communication company, not just a printer, the invitation list for the glamorous event in the middle of Sydney’s CBD targeted new and old clients in the advertising, design and direct marketing community.

    According to Paul Richardson, managing director, there was a most gratifying response rate from customers old and new, and almost 200 industry types turned up on the night to witness the launch of the new corporate image. “We wanted to get out there and let the market know what we do, especially our digital services and new equipment,” he said. “For 30 years Lindsay Yates has flown under the radar and while we have a good reputation in the industry it is time to let the wider world know about what we can.”

    He said the launch is the start of a sustained campaign to raise the company’s profile and flagged expansion in the coming year from both organic growth and takeover options. He highlighted the company’s environmental record, including its FSC accreditation as well as its acquisition of a Heidelberg XL 105. “I think it is a good story to tell the market,” he said.

     

     

     

     

    This was backed up by Craig Loughran, sales director, who maintains that printing companies for too long had not ventured out from their comfort zones. He said the industry did not do enough marketing of itself. “It’s all been very old school. We decided to take a gamble and the feedback so far has been very positive.”

    The company commissioned a new set of creative material to hand out at the launch. (pictured).

  • KBA chief claims 2009 is too tough to call

    Failure by sheetfed printers to follow through on drupa orders forces further redundancies on the German manufacturer.
    Following a ten-day closure at the KBA Radebuel plant near Dresden, the company is looking to move its workforce onto short-time work to cope with a 15.8 percent fall in orders for sheetfed presses. The company is consolidating its sheetfed factories in Germany, Austria and the Czech Republic after doing the same in its web division. The sheetfed division posted a double-digit loss in the quarter.

    The only bright spot was a modest profit generated solely by web and special presses.

    Albrecht Bolza-Schünemann, Ceo, flagged 600 jobs to go out of a workforce of 3,600. He expects the company to post a group loss overall at the end of the calendar year.

    In an indication of the uncertain future facing the industry, the company issued a statement saying there was no point in even trying to predict next year’s events.
    ‘In view of the current turmoil in the international business environment, and unforeseeable developments in financial markets, Bolza-Schünemann sees any attempt to predict KBA’s path beyond 2008 as entailing too many unknown factors to be of any merit.’

  • Candidate of the week: Experienced Print Minder/Print Production Manager

    OVERVIEW
    I arrived in Perth in early November 2008 having been granted permanent residency in Australia, with my skills verified by Trades Recognition Australia.  With over 21 years’ print experience I am seeking a print position that either will enable me to provide me with the opportunity to practise my craft or further develop my production management skills.

    I have extensive machine minding experience and knowledge of overseeing die-stamping, gilt-edging, book-binding, thermographic process, embossing (deboss and emboss), letterpress printing, and aiding customers and their designers to provide print-ready artwork.

     

    MACHINE EXPERIENCE

    Print Machines

    • Heidelberg MOPZ Five Colour    Heidelberg MO Single Colour
    • Heidelberg GTO46 Four Colour    Heidelberg MOFP Two Colour
    • Heidelberg GTO52 Two Colour    Heidelberg SORM-Z Two Colour
    • Heidelberg GTO46 Single Colour    Akira Seisakusho 18-EF Mk III Four Colour
    • Akira Seisakusho 18-EF Three Colour    The Osaka Printing Ink Mfg Co Model 144
    • Conserver Diddie    Heidelberg Platen
    • Thompson Platen    Hamada H234A
    • AB Dick 9920 with T51    Xerox iGen3 Digital Press (Xerox certified)

    Pre-Press
    HighWater Platinum 2218 CTP    PTE Lithoflow metal plate processor

    Finishing

    • Caslon Thermographic Machine    Duplo DC6 Mini 6 Station Collator
    • Kasfold 2000 Booklet maker    MultiGraf Eurofolder
    • Morgana Foldnak 40 + Nagel Trimmer    Morgana Autocreaser 33
    • Morgana Docufold MK2   


    PERSONAL INFORMATION

    I take pride in my work and like to work methodically and efficiently.  I have a creative streak and enjoy problem solving.  I consider myself polite and courteous and fully understand the importance of these qualities.  I am able to communicate well with people at all levels, from different social and economic backgrounds.  I have greatly developed organisational skills and can prioritise workloads and successfully meet deadlines.

    I am reliable and trustworthy, have a good sense of humour and possess the ability to develop and motivate myself and others.  I am a capable worker with effective time management skills.  I have developed into a strong team member, happy to contribute ideas and energy, as well as being able to work on my own initiative.

    I am fully computer literate with knowledge of all the major modern operating systems.  The technical aspect of building computers also interests me.  I have undertaken several computing courses in my free time, including C/C++ Programming and A+ Certification among others.

    I enjoy playing team sports including cricket and rugby.  I also enjoy pool and snooker.  I love travelling and the underwater world and snorkel whenever possible.  I enjoy socialising locally with friends and take a keen interest in local activities.  I am married with no children.

     
    WORK EXPERIENCE

    Barnard & Westwood Ltd, 9 Railway Street, London, N1 9EE
    7 January 2008 to 31 October 2008
    Production Manager

    Duties   
    As the Production Manager I was responsible the smooth running of all litho/digital print and book-binding production work using the Optimus/Printcost management information system.  I reported to the managing director and had line-managerial responsibility for eleven staff in the factory consisting of two lithographic printers, one digital printer, a guillotine operator, a print finisher, two finishing hands, three book-binders and one book-binding manager.  I followed the job from estimating to artwork, printing, delivery and invoicing.  I was able to bring my extensive hands-on print experience to the role, ensuring all work is carried out to the highest standard and often very tight deadlines to guarantee complete customer satisfaction in a very competitive print market.  Confidentiality is also key given that our customers included Buckingham Palace, Westminster Abbey, St Paul’s Cathedral and Lloyds of London.

    Call Print Services Ltd
    108-110 Westferry Studios, Milligan Street, London, E14 8AS
    22 November 2004 – 4 January 2008
    Litho/Digital Print Production Manager

    Prontaprint St Paul’s & The City Ltd
    1 Creed Lane, London, EC4V 5BR
    5 November 2002 – 19 November 2004
    Print Machinist

    Cantate Communications (previously A G Bishops & Sons Ltd)
    Cray Valley Road, St Marys Cray, Orpington, Kent, BR5 2HB
    20 March 2000 – 2 November 2002
    Print Machinist

     

    Besley & Copp Ltd
    1 Otter Court, Manaton Close, Exeter, Devon. EX2 8PF
    17 November 1997 – 17 March 2000
    Print Machinist

    Sprint Quality Printers
    8b Okehampton Place, St Thomas, Exeter, Devon, EX4 1AY
    15 March 1996 – 14 November 1997
    Print Machinist

    Besley & Copp Ltd
    1 Otter Court, Manaton Close, Exeter, Devon. EX2 8PF
    5 June 1987 – 12 March 1996
    Print Machinist

    EDUCATION

    The Open University, UK, 2006 – Present  
    Y159 Understanding Management (June 2008)
    S196 Planets: An Introduction (June 2007)
    Y153 Breakthrough to Mathematics, Science and Technology (October 2006)

    Exeter College, Queen Street, Exeter, Devon, January 1999 – August 1999
    City and Guilds 4242 Basic Computer Skills
    City and Guilds Level 1 Microsoft Access
    City and Guilds Level 2 Programming and Coding in C++

    Scheidegger, (Home Study), May 1998 – May 1999
    Association of Computer Programmers Level 1 Programming in C/C++

    St Thomas High School, Exeter, Devon, 1983 – July 1987
    ‘O’ Level Geography; CSE Biology, Mathematics, Science, Humanities, History, English & Technical Drawing

    References available upon request.

    kevin.higgins@ymail.com

     

  • Australian Tenders of the Week, 18 November 2008

    ATM ID:  FaHCSIA/08/T629
    Agency:  Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
    Category:  45000000 – Printing and Photographic and Audio and Visual Equipment and Supplies
    Close Date & Time:  9-Dec-2008 2:00 pm (ACT Local time)
    Publish Date:  14-Nov-2008
    Location:  ACT, NSW, VIC, SA, WA, QLD, NT, TAS
    Canberra, Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide, Perth, Brisbane, Darwin, Hobart
    ATM Type:  Request for Tender

     

    Description   
    The Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) invites suitably qualified organisations to tender for the provision of printing and promotional products services as a member of a Printing and Promotional Products Panel.

    The scope of the services in this RFT includes the following:

    • Offset printing

    • Digital printing

    • Sourcing and printing a wide range of promotional products

    • Sourcing and printing a wide range of polypropylene products

    Organisations tendering for offset and/or digital printing must have been in the printing industry for a minimum of five years.

    Contact Officer: Michael Gow
    Phone Number: 02 6244 6799
    Email Address:  RFTPrintingandPro@fahcsia.gov.au