Archive for April, 2009

  • Currie truck a hit at Melbourne career expo

    Staff from RMIT’s International Centre of Graphic Technology (ICGT) used the iconic Currie mobile showroom to demonstrate the latest print technology at The Age VCE and Careers Expo last weekend.

    Thousands of visitors flocked to Caulfield Racecourse for the annual event where the big brightly coloured Currie truck proved a standout among the exhibitors.

    ICGT people were kept busy talking to a constant stream of prospective students about the career opportunities in the printing and graphic arts industry.  They were able to guide them through activities and demonstrations on the very latest equipment.

    One of the favourite activities on offer in the Currie truck was the Horizon BQ-150 Perfect Binder, where visitors got the chance to put together their own sketchpad.  Those who had a go at printing posters on the Indigo Press 5500 were able to witness first hand the immediacy and quality of digital printing. Produced using the unique HP Indigo liquid electro photographic technology, the prints were proof of the transformation that digital technology has made in the industry.

    Everyone wanted to come inside the HP Currie truck.

    “Currie Group has a long history of support and association with RMIT and the industry in general. We recognise the value of reaching out to young students to show that the printing industry is a high-tech, sophisticated industry worthy of a career choice,” said Phil Rennell, digital manager of Currie Group.

    Robert Black, RMIT director, praised David Currie’s ongoing involvement and support of the colleges strategy of school engagement. “Full credit to David who really does get behind and believe in our school engagement strategy. It [the Currie truck] greatly enhances our process to engage with career teachers and student in the vital years 10 to 12.”

    Black made the point that now is a good time for the industry to take on apprentices. He warned that during the last recession printing companies backed off from training and when the good times came around the industry suffered a  crippling lack of trained labour.

    The three-day expo attracted over 25,000 visitors and despite the chilly weather on Sunday, the numbers did not wain and there was a steady flow of visitors to the truck throughout the three days.  

    Pictured: Students flock to the Curries Truck to see the power of print.

  • Final call for tickets: NSW CEO Forum, Sydney

    Time is running out to book your tickets for next week’s NSW CEO Forum.

    OPUS Print Group chief, Cliff Brigstocke, will headline the up-coming Printing Industries NSW CEO Forum with a keynote address on ‘Growing a printing business in tough times’. The forum luncheon will be held on Thursday 7 May at Angelo’s On the Bay, overlooking Cabarita Bay, from 12.15pm.

    Brigstocke (pictured), who has recently been active in the fight against the Productivity Commission’s proposal on the parallel importation of books, has risen to prominence in the printing industry following the emergence of OPUS Print Group in October last year.

    The company, which includes Ligare, Cactus Imaging and Omnigraphics New Zealand and, more recently, CanPrint and Union Offset, has been proactively targeting acquisition and expansion, with more expected to come in the following months.

    "It [OPUS] is a brand which boldly states who we are and what we stand for as a group," Brigstocke said.

    "We are united by our vision to sustain the art and passion for print."

    Printing Industries
    CEO Philip Andersen, said Brigstocke’s participation would provide an invaluable insight into the kind of strategies companies should be considering for their business sustainability.

    “There are many opportunities for companies of all sizes to pursue and this forum luncheon will illustrate some of those through the experiences and philosophy of Cliff Brigstocke and his team,” said Andersen.

    Bookings and inquiries about the CEO forum lunch should be directed to Honorine Jarkey on (02) 8789 7300 or e-mail: honorine@printnet.com.au Click here to download the CEO Forum Registration form.

     

  • NSW Government commits to industry safety pact

    WorkCover NSW has arranged an undertaking with Printing Industries to work co-operatively to improve industry Occupational Health and Safety practices.

    The undertaking will be reinforced next week by the signing of a Partnership
    Agreement with the NSW Government by the NSW Minister for Finance, Minister for Infrastructure, Minister for Regulatory Reform, and Minister for Ports and Waterways, Joe Tripodi and Printing Industries CEO Philip Andersen.

    Under the agreement the NSW Government will work with Printing Industries to provide a range of information and support functions for the printing industry including the identification of risk areas within businesses and solutions to minimise them.

    Andersen said the partnership was a very important step in assisting business sustainability.

    “The basic message behind this relationship is that ‘safe business is good business’,” he said.

    “I commend WorkCover on its foresight in wanting to work with industry to identify and minimise safety issues risks. That’s in everyone’s best interests. It’s smart business for companies and for the government.

    “Our industry is facing many challenges ranging from perceptions about its environmental credentials and ability to attract talented young people, to keeping pace with technological change and coping with the global economic crisis.

    “This partnership will go a long way to helping change perceptions about industry working conditions and will also contribute to the performance of NSW companies.

    “WorkCover will work with companies to help improve safety issues and provide support to achieve this in a co-operative and non adversarial way,” he said. Andersen said the launch would be held on site at Bright Printing in Sydney’s western suburbs.

    “It’s very appropriate that the Minister and WorkCover officials get to experience first hand the look and feel of a printing industry company and Bright Print just happens to be close to Mr Tripodi’s electorate office,” he said.

  • Currie truck a hit at Melbourne career expo

    Staff from RMIT’s International Centre of Graphic Technology (ICGT) used the iconic Currie mobile showroom to demonstrate the latest print technology at The Age VCE and Careers Expo last weekend.

    Thousands of visitors flocked to Caulfield Racecourse for the annual event where the big brightly coloured Currie truck proved a standout among the exhibitors.

    ICGT people were kept busy talking to a constant stream of prospective students about the career opportunities in the printing and graphic arts industry.  They were able to guide them through activities and demonstrations on the very latest equipment.

    One of the favourite activities on offer in the Currie truck was the Horizon BQ-150 Perfect Binder, where visitors got the chance to put together their own sketchpad.  Those who had a go at printing posters on the Indigo Press 5500 were able to witness first hand the immediacy and quality of digital printing. Produced using the unique HP Indigo liquid electro photographic technology, the prints were proof of the transformation that digital technology has made in the industry.

    Everyone wanted to come inside the HP Currie truck.

    “Currie Group has a long history of support and association with RMIT and the industry in general. We recognise the value of reaching out to young students to show that the printing industry is a high-tech, sophisticated industry worthy of a career choice,” said Phil Rennell, digital manager of Currie Group.

    Robert Black, RMIT director, praised David Currie’s ongoing involvement and support of the colleges strategy of school engagement. “Full credit to David who really does get behind and believe in our school engagement strategy. It [the Currie truck] greatly enhances our process to engage with career teachers and student in the vital years 10 to 12.”

    Black made the point that now is a good time for the industry to take on apprentices. He warned that during the last recession printing companies backed off from training and when the good times came around the industry suffered a  crippling lack of trained labour.

    The three-day expo attracted over 25,000 visitors and despite the chilly weather on Sunday, the numbers did not wain and there was a steady flow of visitors to the truck throughout the three days.  

    Pictured: Students flock to the Curries Truck to see the power of print.

  • Printers learn to go green online

    Printing Industries has launched a new website, www.sustainablegreenprint.com.au, to provide a central contact point of information and resources for its new environmental management system certification program.

    Printing Industries national communication and technical services manager, Joe Kowalewski, said the site contained all the fundamental information to help printing companies identify the most suitable participation level for their business, including a Frequently Asked Questions section.

    “We want to make embarking on the path to environmental sustainability as straightforward as possible to encourage participation by all industry companies,” he said.

    “This is why we have introduced the four-level Sustainable Green Print (SGP) system based on the ISO14001 framework. Companies entering at the introductory Level 1 can progress at their own pace to other levels including Level 3 which can take them through to ISO14001 or beyond.

    “The site’s Seminars and Training Courses section has the dates for current and proposed training in each State and details of supporting briefing sessions that companies can attend to get additional information.”

    Kowalewski said the first courses, scheduled in NSW, had quickly sold out with the majority of participants electing to go to SGP Level 3 to obtain ISO certification. A second round of courses was under preparation.

    “All these companies begin at Level 1, work through Level 2 and Level 3 training as they implement and complete the necessary procedures and audits within their organisations,” he said.

    The www.sustainablegreenprint.com.au website will also house a register of SGP certified printers as companies successfully complete their chosen participation levels.

    For more information visit www.sustainablegreenprint.com.au or call 1800 227 425 to talk to your local Printing Industries’ office.

  • Optus opts out of paper billing

    Customers hung up over telecommunications giant Optus decision to charge $2.20 for receiving paper bills as it pushes electronic billing.

    Industry sources speculate that the telephony company will actually turn a profit from its pay-for-print venture. From May 1 all Optus customers who chose to receive paper bills will incur the monthly fee, which has applied to new customers since January 1.

    According to an Optus spokesperson, the decision to move bills online was as a result of a communication process with customers and the desire to help the environment.

    “Optus has introduced the paper invoice fee to encourage customers to view their accounts online,” said the spokesperson. “Using the online My Account service reduces the number of paper invoices produced, which is better for the environment.”

    Optus outsources its statement printing and mailing processes to a specialised service provider. Australia and New Zealand is the most advanced market for such outsourcing with industry estimates of over 90 per cent of major corporations outsourcing their statement printing and mailing.

    Depending on the amount of statements a corporation such as Optus deliver, industry pundits estimate of the cost of printing and mailing at around $1.00 – $1.20 including the insertion of marketing leaflets. This produces a profit margin per statement many commercial printers would envy.

    Optus said that customers can avoid the fee by switching to receive their bills online via My Account. One Optus customer complained to Print 21 that the process was time-consuming and difficult to navigate.

    The company may not find its customers quite as receptive to the lack of printed statements as it hopes. In September last year, Vodafone New Zealand introduced online billing, providing paper bills at a monthly fee of $1.50 per month. In February this year, the company was forced to abandon the plan after a consumer backlash.

    Vodafone spokesman, Paul Brislen said that the $1.50 charge provoked the most anger. "They [customers] quite like the idea of online billing but they hate, hate, hate the idea of being charged to receive a paper bill," he said.

  • Climo climbs down from Bluestar NZ

    Resignation of Glen Climo, long-term former NZ CEO, highlights the continuing transformation of the trans-Tasman printing giant.

    One of the founding shareholding executives of Bluestar, Climo was replaced as CEO NZ in January by David Jupe. Since then he has been working on special projects with Chris Mitchell, group managing director.

    “Glen has decided to move on for personal reasons. He’s a great guy and we wish him well,” said Mitchell.

    “David Jupe and his senior management team are working on key changes to the company in this challenging market and he has my full support.”

    Climo is the latest departure in a line of former printing company owners who sold their businesses into the Bluestar conglomerate. He was a partner in Nicholson Printing with ‘Bunny’ Nicholson and according to industry sources will be badly missed by the company.

    Many of the original shareholding managers have had a tough trot adjusting to the changing economic conditions and the new management style since the takeover by Champ Private Equity. The expansion into Australia and the subsequent rationalisations and major redundancies on both sides of the Tasman have changed the original business model almost beyond recognition.

  • Kodak flexs its print with Flexcel NX System

    Revamped Kodak Flexcel NX System offers greater print flexibility.

    Kodak first introduced the Flexcel NX System in 2007 and later relaunched it last year with updates to the media, the lamination process and imaging technology using the latest square spot equipment.

    According to Darren Yeates, Kodak packaging segment expert, the system is suited to anyone involved in flexible packaging who wants the highest quality flexographic print.

    “With the Flexcel NX System, the same high quality images can be predictably and consistently reproduced on a flexible pouch, carton, label or other stock, delivering maximum shelf impact and preserving brand integrity,” he said.

    Pictured: A sample of packaging printed with the Flexcel NX System.

    Yeates believes that the Flexcel NX System’s strength is its ability to use offset separations for flexo reproduction. “It eliminates the need for retouching specific flexo output and achieves a full tonal range,” he said.

    There are no Flexcel NX Systems currently operating in Australia, though Kodak is running trials to see where the system will be the most suitable. Yeates hopes that after the system goes on display at next month’s PacPrint, interest will grow.

    “We are hoping to have some additional trials after this,” he said.

  • Long-time PMP staff move up to new roles

    New CEO of PMP, Richard Allely, calls for board restructure and makes more executive appointments.

    Following on from Allely’s earlier comments that there would be a number of new appointments taking place in the company, Phillip Elbourne (pictured) has taken on the role of chief financial officer and Alistair Clarkson as company secretary. Both positions were previously held by Allely.

    The two men have both been PMP employees for years; Elbourne joined the company in 2003 and Clarkson in 2001. Allely believes that this experience made them ideal candidates.

    “Both executives have a detailed understanding of the business and strong capabilities,” he said. “I look forward to working with them in these new roles.”

    In addition to the appointments, PMP has also undergone a board restructure. Peter George, recently made head of the company’s print business, will step down from the Audit and Risk Management Committee and be replaced as chairman by Ian Fraser. The committee will also gain a new member, Marcia Griffin; however, George will retain a board position as an executive director.

    According to PMP chairman, Graham Reaney, the new structure allows the board to retain George’s management and strategic planning skills.

    “His continued contribution at a board level will be important as PMP goes through the restructuring necessary to deliver sustainable profitability in these difficult market conditions,” Reaney said.

  • Girls’ day out at manroland

    22 young women drop in to manroland in Augsburg, Germany, to learn about apprenticeship careers in printing.

    As part of annual action day, Girl’s Day, 22 girls between the ages of 14 and 16 visited a series of workshops in the MAN vocational training centre. They took a tour of the drawing school and learnt about machining, oxy-arc cutting, milling, and the electrical training.

    manroland has participated in Girls’ Day for years  and estimates that a total of 800,000 girls have so far have discovered careers in areas such as printing, industrial mechanics, and mechatronic engineering as a result.


    According to Kaspar Fischer, senior manager at the MAN Training Centre, there has been a surge in the number of women in the printing industry: “We are increasingly seeking female junior staff. Girls are often very talented technically, but criteria such as social behavior and ambition are also of great importance to us. Girls’ Day is our chance to recruit female apprentices for technical careers.”

    Girls who attended the manroland open day said that they were not previously aware of printing as a profession and would not have considered it as a vocation. A common criticism in the printing industry is that it is too male-dominated. However, in recent years events such as Heidelberg Women in Print have slowly changed this perception.

  • Thirsty work brings beer bundle together

    Beer lovers get the whole package thanks to a New Zealand initiative which combines two beer glasses with a standard dozen box of Export 33.

    The idea of bringing bottle and glass straight to the consumer was conceptualised and designed by Production Partners’ Lee Shaw. The functional point-of-sale creation has proven popular in the commercial marketplace and is now a contender for a Pride In Print Award in the packaging structural design corrugated cases category.

    “The packaging needed to be strong enough to hold and protect the glasses as well as follow the brand in terms of style,” said Shaw.

    “Crucially, it had to easily attach to the existing pack of beer and all of this had to fit within the budget too.”

    Pictured: Pride In Print judge, Grant Lefus, with the entry.

    “We have had very good feedback and subsequently even made a standalone version for a conference that was used as a giveaway as a glass pack only.”

    Shaw’s passion for beer meant that the inspiration for the concept came readily. “I suppose it was one of those things that just jumped out at me and made sense, and was within all the realms of production and cost,” he said.

    Production involved a printed four-colour process and gloss-laminated one side on 170gsm sumit gloss stock, the package was line-mounted onto 212E flute, then die-cut formed and finished.

    “The production of this job needed to have four different suppliers which I co-ordinated individually. So I wanted them all within close proximity and with familiarity to each other so I could make the deadline and oversee each stage easily,” Shaw said.

  • Letters, feedback, get it off your chest: 29 April 2009

    More praise for Print 21 this week, while readers share their thoughts on recent news.

    Letter of the week

    I must take this opportunity to congratulate you one your newsletters; they are definitely the most informative I have ever seen and so very consistent.

    Jeanie Nagle

    ***********

    Re: Government backs printing industry survival plan

    Yes, it would be good if members outside the area unable to attend could have access to the workshop material.

    Fiona Brackenbury

    ***********

    Re: Prografica powers up with FBA Deloittes Award

    Good on you Kerim and Jim. Always knew you were winners
     
    Mark Price

  • Mirror mirror, on the wall: Print21 magazine article

    It’s time for the printing industry to take a good hard look at its green credentials. While many printers claim to be concerned about the environment, the number of companies prepared to put themselves to the test in the full gaze of the public eye is still miniscule. Simon Enticknap looks at recent industry moves to improve the green accountability of printers.

    Progress in improving the environmental performance of the printing industry is often measured in tiny increments. It’s a topic that seems to have been on the agenda for ever; it is discussed openly ad nauseum at industry functions and in boardrooms but still it seems that the printing industry is unable to shake off its image as a nasty polluter. A dirty, tree-killing, chemical user.

    That’s not surprising really because, for too long, there has been a lot of truth in these accusations. Printing in the past did involve some very environmentally questionable practices and while the industry has come a long way in the past decade, the mud still sticks. This hurts everybody, both the new breed of green printers who are trying to improve the industry’s track record as well as those who have done little to change proactively but who now feel the pressure of competition from alternative media sources that are all too happy to paint themselves as paragons of cleanliness.

    Pictured: The first of the Truly Green: Graduates from the first GASAA environmental management system accreditation course receive their certificates (l-r) Garry Knespal (GASAA), Luke Everingham (Shepson Printing), Nathan Kable (Rawson Graphics), Michael Jones (CDM Print), David Whitfield (Digitalpress), Rick McDonald(NSW Department of Lands Graphic Services), Wayne Dabbs (JA Wales Printers), Paul Kohn (AKP Leura).


    The latest attempt to make tangible progress in this area comes in the form of industry-based certification programs that aim to lead printers towards the internationally accepted standard for environmental management, ISO 14001 (or ISO 14001:2004 Environment Management Systems certification – to give it its full name). These programs are designed to help printers overcome their reluctance to embrace more environmentally-sound practices – which may be due to a lack of knowledge or an unwillingness to invest in this area – and provide an open, transparent and credible means of enabling customers to determine what constitutes a ‘green’ printer and how to find them.

    In Australia, Printing Industries recently launched its Sustainable Green Print (SGP) program (see page 12) which offers a graduated assessment scheme for printers wanting to chose the level of environmental management to implement. This step-by-step approach recognises that while, for many printers, ISO 14001 certification might be a desirable goal, the resources and time involved in getting to that point effectively puts it out of reach for many companies – at least for now.

    In the same vein, GASAA recently awarded certificates to the first batch of graduates in NSW from its Truly Green program which is also designed to bring companies to the point at which they are capable of taking on the ISO 14001 audit. This group-based training program is also kicking off in Victoria later this month as well as a second group in Sydney and one starting in Brisbane.

    In New Zealand, the main industry program is the Enviro-Mark scheme which has been in operation for several years and is not restricted to the printing industry. Late last year, Soar Printing became the first New Zealand printer to achieve the Diamond level Enviro-Mark (other levels are platinum, gold, silver and bronze) which, again, indicates that the company is ready to undertake an ISO 14001 audit.

    Of course, there are already ISO 14001-certified printers in Australia although exactly how many is hard to determine. Green print pioneers such as Finsbury Green and Focus Press have had ISO certification for a number of years now and they have slowly been joined by a number of other progressive companies such as Scott Print in WA, Sprinta Print in Tasmania, Complete Colour in Victoria and Lilyfield Printing in NSW (there are others too). Even web printers such as Offset Alpine and HannanPrint have joined in. Nevertheless, the number remains pretty low, an indication perhaps of the time, expense, effort and know-how required to gain a certificate that many printers still don’t recognise as an essential requirement.

    Standing on the shoulders
    The introduction of industry-based accreditation schemes is partly a recognition that while many are willing, the majority of printers still don’t know where to begin and find it too much of challenge to take on something like ISO certification by themselves.

    Joe Kowalewski at Printing Industries says one of the big advantages of an industry-based scheme is that a lot of the hard work in terms of finding out what requirements are relevant to the printing industry has already been done. Instead of starting from scratch each time, individual companies can take advantage of the work that has been done before them and focus on what is unique and specific to the printing industry.

    The corollary of this is that the industry-based schemes are being presented as a more cost-effective means of moving towards ISO 14001 certification. The GASAA Truly Green program, for instance, shares the costs of the ISO standards consultant, Paul Kohn of AKP Leura, between the participants. Each company still gets individual attention in the form of onsite audits conducted by Kohn and then come together for the five group sessions held monthly.

    Garry Knespal at GASAA said that participants also benefited from the group dynamic which enabled them to share information and swap advice. Graduates of the first course confirmed that the group instruction had been beneficial and emphasised that the program did require working at – it wasn’t simply a case of sitting through it and then getting the piece of paper.

    So what do these schemes aim to do? Fundamentally, what all these programs are doing is helping businesses set up their own environmental management systems (EMS) ie the in-house processes companies must have in place to manage their environmental impact. Typically this involves identification of potential areas of waste or pollution and an assessment of the risk these pose. In the process, all parts of a company’s activities are assessed (including the front office) and issues such as chemical, power and water usage as well as waste generated are measured and documented. Obviously legal obligations must be met but an effective EMS will also seek to introduce a culture of continuous improvement with new goals and recurring audits.

    If this sounds a lot like the ISO 9001 quality assurance programs that were so popular in the mid-90s then that’s no accident; ISO 14001 shares a lot in common with ISO 9001 and anybody who already has the latter certification will already have done a lot of the hard yards towards ISO 14001.

    Not quite ISO
    The other aspect that these schemes – SGP, Truly Green and Enviro-Mark – share in common is that while they aim to take you towards ISO 14001 certification, it’s not the same as getting it: you still have to go through that audit process in addition to the industry scheme if you want to gain full ISO certification.

    Currently, for instance, if you undertake the industry scheme to get to ISO 14001 standard, it will cost $7,500 for GASAA members in the Truly Green program and $8,000 for Printing Industries members who undertake level 3 in the SGP (There is also a level 4 for those printers who want to go beyond ISO 14001). If subsequently a company wants to obtain the ISO certification, the audit process is an additional cost – how much depends on a number of factor such as the size of the company, the number of sites and even who is doing the auditing. As a result, estimates vary from as low as $1,500 up to $20,000. And it’s not just a one-off fee: audits have to be carried out on a regular basis afterwards to ensure the certification is maintained. The initial audit process itself can take several months and involves an preliminary audit followed by another one a month later and then regular follow-up audits at six monthly or annual intervals.

    Both Printing Industries and GASAA are negotiating with accreditation agencies to get a better deal for their association members but, even so, you’re not going to get any change out of $10k if you want to be able to display the green tick box of ISO 14001.

    So what is the benefit?

    You will save money. That’s the verdict not just of the associations and the accreditors involved but also printers who have been through the ISO process. Any formal procedure that seeks to identify waste in a business will ultimately have a payback, not just in terms of reduced consumption of raw materials but also in helping to identify areas of the business which are not functioning as efficiently as possible. Quite often, excessive waste, like unsafe work practices, is a symptom of a more general malaise in a business that may remain hidden from view.

    At the graduation ceremony for the first GASAA Truly Green printers, Luke Everingham of Shepson Printing made the point that undertaking the course was like holding up a mirror to the business.

    “And just like when you look in the mirror first thing in the morning, what you see is not always very pretty,” he commented.

    Change or perish
    Joe Kowalewski agrees that, for a lot of printers, taking on something like eco-accreditation is a big ask but one that is becoming increasingly necessary.

    “For a lot of people it’s a cultural change,” he agrees. “It is an impost but you need to do it if you want to remain competitive.”

    Eventually governments will start legislating for compliance with environmental codes – this happens already but is increasing, for instance with carbon emissions – so it’s important to get in early and be proactive before printing gets caught out. In many ways, these schemes are the best chance yet for the industry to improve its image and show that it is trying to do the right thing.

    Phase 2 of the process, according to Kowalewski, will be to publicise a register of SGP certified printers and promote it with government agencies and major corporates so customers will know where to go to find a green printer and can see exactly what it is they are doing for the environment. And because the scheme is audited, it reinforces that the changes are real and tangible, not just a feel-good motherhood statement.

    If this takes off, the question for printers in the future will be not how much it costs but rather how long they can afford not to be a part of it.

    As for the argument that a looming recession is not the best time to be engaging in environmental accreditation, Kowalewski says that in fact the opposite is true. What better time to do something like this than when the industry is relatively quiet. Nobody ever has enough time to do such things when they are busy but now they have the opportunity and the time to undertake such work. Plus, in the end, it will give them a competitive edge.

  • AUCTION SALE

    Tuesday 28 April, 2009 At 11.00am
    7 Macro Court, Rowville, Victoria

    BOOK BINDERY PLANT & EQUIPMENT, OFFICE FURNITURE, COMPUTERS, FORKLIFT TRUCK & MOTOR VEHICLES

    On View Day Prior From 9.00am To 4.00pm & Morning Of Sale From 8.30am

    Under Instructions From Mr Bruce Mulvaney Of Bruce Mulvaney & Co Liquidator Of Dunn & Wilson Pty Ltd T/As Apollo-Moon Bookbinders (In Liquidation)

    For Further Details Contact Mr Wayne Eddy On (03) 9687 4955

    For Catalogue & Photographs Visit Our Website www.dominiongroup.net.au

     

    This Sale Is GST Inclusive And A 12.5% Buyers Premium Will Apply. Registration Fee $100.  A Non-Refundable Deposit Of 20% On The Fall Of The Hammer.  All Sale Payments Cash, Bank Cheque, Debit Or Credit Card. (Credit Card Charges Will Apply). Please Check With The Auctioneer Prior To The Sale That No Major Items Have Been Withdrawn.

    REF: S2296

     

  • WorkCover gets behind NSW Print Awards

    A major sponsor has been found for this year’s NSW awards, resulting in a change of name to WorkCover NSW Print Excellence Awards 2009.

    Printing Industries CEO Philip Andersen welcomed the sponsorship, which he believes will strengthen the annual awards.

    “We are greatly indebted to WorkCover for their support in this way and for their willingness to work co-operatively with us for the betterment of the NSW industry,” he said.

    “We are working on the NSW sponsorship strategy at present and to have this key component confirmed at this stage is a very positive sign.”

    The NSW call for entries will be made on Thursday 7 May during the NSW CEO Forum which will feature guest speaker OPUS Print Group CEO Cliff Brigstocke. The awards presentation dinner will be held on Friday 13 November 2009.

    Information on awards sponsorship, awards criteria and presentation night bookings is available from Honorine Jarkey at Printing Industries on (02) 8789 7300 e-mail: honorine@printnet.com.au

  • Armstrong Miller + McLaren turn a new page with 2:1 book

    Larger-than-life celebrations for Armstrong Miller + McLaren’s 40-year anniversary.

    Since opening in 1969, corporate design house Armstrong Miller + McLaren has continued to grow to new sizes; but perhaps nothing as large as its new 20-page book launched at the company’s 40th birthday party last week.

    Body of Work 2:1 follows on from 1:1, which was launched last year and is on display at the Menzies Hotel in Sydney. According to Bob Armstrong, managing director, it is one of the largest books in the world, measuring 1.45 metres deep by 3.5 metres wide.

    “The whole idea of the book is that it’s for people who want to make a statement,” he said. “Normally, people buy a painting for their office; the difference is that with a book you can keep changing the pages, and every one of the photos is an original.”

    All eyes were turned on the latest Body of Work 2:1 at Armstrong Miller + McLaren’s birthday bash.

    Printed and bound by Colour Scan in Singapore, 2:1 is available for $10,000. Armstrong hopes to produce one book of this size each year. The 90 party attendees were all impressed by its scale and grandeur.

    In his 40 years running the company, Armstrong says that one thing which hasn’t changed is its commitment to quality and innovation. “It’s pretty rare that a private company can last for 40 years under the same management,” he said.

    “We started not just a new company but a new industry which before was a no-man’s land between the client and the printer.”

    Pictured: Guests celebrating in style.

  • Australian Paper launches 100 percent carbon neutral speciality paper

    Australian Paper launches 100 percent carbon neutral speciality paper
    ENVI speciality paper from Shoalhaven mill gets Federal Government Greenhouse Friendly accreditation.

    With an expected first year production target of 750 tonnes, the new grades will boost demand for the greenhouse friendly ENVI, which is also made in the company’s mills in Tasmania. Australian Paper has produced 33,000 tonnes of ENVI carbon neutral paper since its launch last year.

    It is now up to Government and the corporate market to get behind the carbon neutral paper in order to make a difference, said Paul Allen, general manager for marketing, PaperlinX printing and publication papers. “This innovation provides business with a genuine and simple means of reducing its scope 3 carbon emissions,” he said.

    Scopes 1 to 3 are direct and indirect emission deemed mandatory to report under the Federal Government’s National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting Act 2007. Scope 3 focuses on indirect emissions of products purchased, such as paper.

    To achieve the accreditation, Australian Paper ensured the Shoalhaven mill met the environmental ISO140400 standard.

     
     
     
     
     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    “We are committed to continuously reducing our own carbon footprint and assisting users of paper to do likewise,” said Allen – pictured on left with Joanna Gash MP, Federal Member for Gilmore and Bruce Borchardt mill manager at the launch at Shoalhaven mill.
     

    “In the last seven years we have reduced our greenhouse emissions by 14 percent – the equivalent of taking 4,100 cars off the road,” he said.

    The new writing, text and cover grade paper provide a boost for Shoalhaven, one of the smallest of the Australian Paper mills and part of the sale to Dainippon Paper.  growing concentration on high value security papers. As part of its environmental accreditation it moved from coal to gas boilers last year, reducing its carbon footprint by around 57 percent.

    Allen is encouraging customers who use ENVI to make use of the Federal Government’s Greenhouse Friendly consumer logo on their printed products.