Archive for January, 2010

  • For sale: Komori Lithrone L428

    Komori Lithrone L428 press up for sale.

    The overall condition of the press is in excellent A1 condition with no major repairs ever done to the machine,and none are expected,

    • Very clean and neat with a high print quality.
    • Only done 34 million impressions.
    • It has a full CPI service history.
    • All gears and cylinders are perfect.
    • KMS Komori Management System
    • Also includes CIP3
    • PQC console
    • IR dryer
    • Automatic blanket washers
    • Automatic ink roller cleaners
    • Available immediately

    If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact Tony Aldatmaz
    at Printmode on 1300 110 110 or by email: tanzalda@gmail.com

  • Letters, feedback, get it off your chest: 3 February 2010

    One reader gets behind James Cryer’s call to promote print outside of the industry, while another reader reckons its time for printers to move with the times. What’s your opinion?

    Re: Print myths busted at LIA seminar
    I applaud Philip Lawrence telling us about the convenient lie, but it’s
    wasted on the wrong people.

    Let’s get him or some other top industry mouthpiece on the morning shows and tell the public why it’s rubbish that the banks want to stop your paper bank statements to save the environment, and that it produces bucket loads more greenhouse gas when you print it out at home – or even view it on your screen than being produced commercially and mailed to you!
    Or so I’m told …

    Clyde King

    *******

    Re: Industry activists target anti-paper website

    I have already posted comments in response to the muted changes in marketing practices and ‘self-concept’ required to survive in today’s world of electronic publishing. I thank Andy McCourt for focussing our attention on facts and not relying on emotional attachment to the way things ought to be as this seems to underscore many of the contributions on the subject. More information like this needs to come to light.  I baulk at challenging the position of such a knowledgeable and respected industry observer however, I get the feeling that our response is too often shaped more by the perceived threat these new modes of IT bring because we are not part of the process. I wonder what our perspective would be if we had more ‘ownership’ of these newer modes of information technology that followed print.
     
    Once you step back from the perspective of a having a ‘vested interest’ in print alone and see yourself as part of a Graphic Technologies industry things start to change. To take it further imagine how you would see the world if you won lotto and didn’t have to work again! When (a poor fool like me) does this I start to think about the state of the planet, the number of people in the world, the impact of human habitation and  their consumption. I will never understand the complexities of the global warming debate but I DO know that I want a clean planet enriched with natural beauty for future generations to enjoy. One that it is in better shape than when I came into this world. I want my impact to be ‘revenue neutral’.
     
    In order to do this I need the truth and that means unbiased, accurate information. Hopefully, some of that will emerge from the investigation into the industry’s carbon footprint initiated by the ISO TC 130 (International Standards Organisation Technical Committee for Graphic Technologies). Hopefully, it will be unbiased, accurate, truly scientific and highlight the benefits, as well as the disadvantages, of a wide range of media, not just print. This is not in anyone’s long-term interest. In the interim I will continue to develop my web publishing and multimedia skills to complement my expertise with print.
     
    Mark Stegman

     
    *******
     
    I read with interest the comments of those tiring of the ‘doom and gloom’ about the future of print as if to ignore the march of technology will prevent the inevitable. The initiatives of industry groups such as PODi have done well to promote business models that are only new to an industry where there is often an irrational attachment to past practices, as well as modes of delivery. After all, printing was the first IT industry. Why not just get on with it and embrace these new tools, techniques and market strategies.
     
    As if to underline the sense of unreality in all of this I pinch myself as I read praise for a video on YouTube promoting print! Such sweet irony.
     
    Mark Stegman
  • Printers with a certain quality – Print 21 magazine article

    It was fate that brought them together and saw the creation of a successful Western Australian printing business that has triumphed against the odds. Mitchell Jordan meets the two inspirational men behind Quality Press.

    Atish Shah and Ramesh Patel believe in making five-year plans for their company; but when the pair both arrived in Australia 14 years ago, neither knew that their future would lie in printing. Indeed, they did not even know each other.

    Migrating from Kenya in 1995, the two men saw Australia as a promising new country to start afresh and fulfil their long-held dreams of running a business. As anyone who has ever been overseas would know, arriving in an alien land is always startling. It was a relief, then, when a migration agent introduced the two men who would eventually see that they shared more similar hopes and ambitions than they thought.

    “We didn’t know each other at all; the only thing we had in common was coming from the same place at the same time,” Shah recalls.

    It did not take long to realise that by working together they could achieve something and, from there, a unique partnership formed.

    “Being in a different country brought a lot of anxiety so we thought that by joining hands we would share the risk,” Shah says.

    Pictured: Quality printers, Ramesh Patel (left) and Atish Shah (right) with some of their award-winning work.

    There is no doubting it was a risky decision that the pair made. After considering a number of businesses, an advertisement in the paper for Quality Press, an Osborne Park-based printing business in administration, caught their eye.

    Neither had any prior involvement with the printing industry but Patel had a management degree from university and Shah was equipped with a business degree of his own. They believed that with this knowledge, and their experience working for companies overseas, they could turn Quality Press into a sound, successful business.

    Not everyone in the local industry shared this opinion.

    “It was pretty daunting,” Shah recounts. “We had a company that had been in administration – a lot of suppliers had written us off and thought that we wouldn’t survive. Slowly, we built up our credibility with clients and improved our reputation.”

    Part of the survival tactics included devising regular five-year plans for Quality Press, along with a wider grand plan for the company’s future. The first few years involved testing the water and widening their understanding of the printing industry.

    In 1999, the pair bought land in Osborne Park, not far from Quality Press’ original location in the same suburb and constructed a purpose-built building where the company remains today. Starting out as an A2 operation, it soon became evident that there was a big demand for A1 so a new 5-colour Komori press followed, along with the installation of CtP.

    Any doubts that industry players may have had about Quality Press were soon dispelled when, in 2004, the company stepped into the spotlight with Australia’s first installation of an A1 10-colour Komori LS1040P press, which gave them a major competitive advantage over other businesses.

    With an existing Komori fleet, Quality Press had already set up a relationship with the manufacturer.

    “Our old machines were Komori so the know-how was already established with that product line,” Patel says. “We never had any problems with Komori and didn’t see the need to change.”

    Growth for QPrint Online

    Recognising the obvious rise of digital printing, management made the decision to grow QPrint Online, its digital branch established in 2006. QPrint Online, which, although still a part of Quality Press, has a different name due to the nature of the work it produces.

    “Moving into digital printing is far more than just buying a machine,” Patel says. “The culture is different, which is why we keep the two separate.”
    Armed with a Kodak Nexpress, the branch has been developing considerably ever since its inception. The next phase involved buying a new machine – this time, from the Currie Group. Patel and Shah first caught sight of the HP Indigo 5500 at PacPrint last year and were impressed.

    “We are always analysing our strengths and weaknesses,” Shah says. “The Nexpress continues to be important for QPrint Online but we thought that having an Indigo would give us additional strength along with providing extra choice for our customers.”

    Adrian Dixon, state manager for the Currie Group in Western Australia, believes that the 5500, which was installed in early November, will open up a number of promising opportunities for the company.

    “It will allow them to take on new markets due to its quality,” he says. “It will also give them access to more high-end work.”

    Pictured: Planning for the future, (l-r) Ramesh Patel, Adrian Dixon and Atish Shah.

    Shah sees that offset will continue to be an integral part of the company’s range of services, but change and new developments is something that Quality Press takes seriously.

    “There will always be a need for offset – at least in the next five to 10 years; but we also see the importance of moving with the technology,” he said.

    Looking forward, looking back
    It is easy for any business to grow nostalgic or complacent over time, but management at Quality Press are just as focussed on the future. As Shah notes, businesses must change because so much has shifted in the wider world. “The next five years will be quite interesting and challenging for us after the downturn,” he says.

    “A lot of thinking has changed and customers are most cost-conscious than before. We will focus on customer service based on their budgets.”
    Patel adds that in the next five years, Quality Press hopes to offer a full print management service to its customers.

    Working to enhance its environmental credentials is a major priority for the company over the next five years and it hopes that during this time it will become both carbon neutral and solar powered.

    With a name like Quality Press, customers expect printing of the highest possible standard. This is not hard, given that the company achieved ISO 12456 certification from DES in July last year.

    Another aim is to educate the wider community of the benefits of print as a product.

    “We want to present print as an environmentally friendly option for our clients,” Shah says. “A lot of media recently has been working against print. What we want is to convince clients that printing properly actually uses less emissions than a desktop printer and that reading from a hardcopy is a lot more relaxing than staring at something on the screen.”

    Quality Press today has a team of just under 60 (including staff from QPrint Online), but Shah and Patel insist that it is still very much a family business. Proof of this claim can be seen when wandering the offices or factory floor where Patel’s son, and Shah’s two brothers can both be found.

    If printing is considered as being bad for the environment, then it also has a reputation as being an industry of older people. At Quality Press, much has been done to indoctrinate the younger generation who will quite literarily be the company’s future and lifeblood.

    “We have planned for the next 25 years and that involves putting young blood into the company,” Patel says. “We are giving them the chance to take the business forward.”

    When the two look back on Quality Press’ extensive history that began in late 1995, they do so with not only a sense of pride, but also an admission that it only seems like yesterday that they saw the advertisement in the newspaper. Much has changed of course, but some things have still stayed the same and the pair remain good friends.

    “For us, making money is important but having a stable lifestyle which printing offers is also very important,” Shah says.

    “We have never regretted buying this company. It was a challenge, but totally worthwhile. We are very satisfied with what we have done.”

    Patel adds that on top of turning Quality Press into a local success story, it has been rewarding to build a friendship between two people who might otherwise have never met. “We have become like two brothers,” he says. “We see each other as an accomplishment.”

  • Candidate of the week: Digital Print Operator, Victoria

    I am an experienced  digital print operator specialising in xerox IGen3 & 4 machines and in house digital print finishing duties.

    In addition, I have a trade certificate in printing with over 20 years experience.

    For further information please contact me rthibbles@yahoo.com

  • Candidate of the Week – Graphic Pre-press, Melbourne

    CAREER OBJECTIVES:

    • To join a stable and progressive organization that offers strong career.

    • Prospects within graphic pre-press and multimedia environment as an entry-level graphic designer position in a reputed organization.

    • Seeking opportunities to gain new skills and offer future employer’s value.

    SUMMERY OF QUALIFICATIONS:

    • Experienced in designing for Logo’s, poster designing and menu designs.

    • Proficient in most commonly used computer design applications.

    • Educated in Graphic designs.

    • Able to communicate exceedingly well with clients.

    PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS:

    • Created logo and advertising layouts for a local Restaurant.

    • Designed various newsletters for large and small college student groups.

     

    EDUCATION/TRAINING:

    • 2009 – 2010  Pursuing Diploma of Multimedia.

    • 2008- 2009  Certificate 3 in Graphic pre-press.

    • 2004-2008  Bachelor of Engineering.

    • 2003-2004  Secondary Education (+2).

    COMPUTER SKILLS:
    Adobe: Illustrator, In design, Photoshop, Flash Cs3, Premiere pro, 3D’s Max, Director 7 and 11
    Microsoft: Word, PowerPoint, Xl

    EMPLOYMENT HISTORY:
    Aaron Institute of Multimedia, Hyderabad, India.
    As a team member in Illustration team.   

     

    REFEREES:
    Will be made available on request.

     email.  santhudadi@hotmail.com

  • Candiate of the week: GENERAL MANAGER – Sheet-fed Offset, Sydney or Brisbane

    • International experience in Senior Management
    • Excellent "hands-on" understanding of printing
    • Previous "change-agent" experiences

     
    General Manager with a proven track record, here and overseas, seeks a challenging senior operations or general management  role within a medium-sized offset printing company – preferably in Sydney or Brisbane.

    Skills encompass managing the day-to-day running of all aspects of the business including, administration, operations, production and sales admin with some involvement in financial management. Accustomed to coordinating resources effectively, able to analyze, plan, and implement a large number of projects and functions effectively – while at the same time providing a strategic overview.

    Over 30 years local and international experience in commercial printing, he is comfortable with managing demanding deadlines, complex multiple production environments and diverse technologies.

    His expertise includes: good commercial acumen, strong key client management, well-founded people management skills, plus extensive purchasing and procurement knowledge.

    Described by clients as "Mister Fix-it", with a hands-on, firm-but-fair management style, he has managed such difficult events as plant closures (including redundancies), relocation of equipment and key staff – and all without loss of respect and with seamless effect.

    Experience covers the full suite of print production processes, having managed several printing businesses in Australia and the UK (in one case with several 100 staff and with sales offices in Europe, Ireland and the USA).

    This gentleman would be a valuable asset to any printing business, particularly one seeking to "manage change" or seeking to re-engineer itself for greater profitability.

     

    Contact James Cryer now, at JDA Print Recruitment – 0408 291 508 or james@jdaprintrecruit.com.au – for an obligation-free discussion. 

     

    JDA PRINT RECRUITMENT (Sydney) – 02 9904 6222
    mobile – 0408 291 508
    Email – james@jdaprintrecruit.com.au

    JDA PRINT RECRUITMENT (Melbourne) – 03 9874 158
    Mob – 0413 055 834
    Email – chris@jdaprintrecruit.com.au

     
    Visit our website at : www.jdaprintrecruit.com.au

  • Oce grows wider with ColorWave 300

    Launch of ColorWave 300  single footprint multifunctional device expected to make a mark in Australia.

    The new system offers companies the ability to combine two different purchases into one, delivering significant cost savings, as well as enabling the release of  floor space, otherwise occupied by a second machine.

    Companies involved in technical document printing: architects, engineers, construction firms and commercial printers, providing wide format plan printing services to their customers, now have an alternative to conventional wide format toner-based systems.

    Product Manager for the Océ ColorWave 300 for Océ-Australia Limited, Olya Yemchenko, believes that it is the first system with a truly integrated scanner so businesses can print, copy, scan and control all functions from one user panel with only one IP address to maintain.

    “Océ Image Logic and Océ Dynamic Switching facilitate the printing of complex GIS drawings or copying detailed B&W CAD documents,” she said.

    The Océ ColorWave 300 has an inbuilt powerful controller, allowing it to swiftly handle all file formats: HP-Gl/2, PDF, DWF, JPEG, without sacrificing speed.

    While the Océ ColorWave 300 directly addresses the needs of plan print users, Yemchenko says that Océ sees a wider market for the product. Customers handling technical documents are looking for compact, low volume systems they can put anywhere.

    “Commercial printers are increasingly expanding their product offering to include new services such as plan printing. The ColorWave 300 is an attractive option for reprographers who can produce wide format B&W and colour output on a single system. Furthermore, users can scan to and print directly from a USB device at the printer. This is ideal for walk up customers needing a job done quickly,” she said.

    The Océ ColorWave 300 is immediately available in following the official global release of the new system. Océ expects the first Océ ColorWave 300 product to be installed in Australia within the first quarter of 2010.

  • Printers profit at Ipex: Nick Craig Waller

    Ipex is drawing closer and optimism is in the air, writes Nick Craig Waller, marketing director of the premium print trade show, who has tips on how to turn your trip into a profitable experience.

    At the time of writing there are encouraging indications that by May when Ipex will open its doors for eight days, we will see the global economy begin to recover. However, recent findings from our Global Print Survey indicate that the majority of printers surveyed continue to worry about flat or declining sales. In addition to their sales trauma, they also cited increasing profit margins and controlling costs as the biggest issues facing their business.

    Like all the major exhibitions in the industry, Ipex provides an unrivalled opportunity to meet and talk with your suppliers, competitors and customers, and to see the equipment that will shape the future of your business. However, a visit to Ipex wouldn’t be complete without picking up some valuable business tips from industry experts as well.

    For the first time ever, visitors to Ipex will be able to take advantage of a new, free-of-charge training and seminar programme at the event designed to tackle the issues that keep most printers awake at night. Designed to accommodate up to 60 people, the Printers’ Profit Zone will offer dynamic and interactive Master Class sessions.

    Each Master Class will offer practical advice in the areas of growing sales, increasing profit margins and improving cashflow. The sessions are being run by Nick Devine, the founder of www.theprintcoach.com. The finance Master Classes will include experts from both inside and outside the industry. There will be four Master Classes a day on hot topics such as ‘Lead Generation for Printers’, ‘Compensating your Sales Team’, ‘Value-Based Selling’, ‘Wealth Protection’, ‘Raising Finance’, ‘Profitable Marketing’ and ‘Attracting Ideal Clients’.

    So, if you haven’t done so already, log on to www.ipex.org/register to pre-register for what we believe will be the most important Ipex ever. Arrange your travel, book your hotel, check out the excellent exhibitor line up and visitor features, and get ready to pick up some valuable business ideas that will help your business flourish.

  • Printers profit at Ipex: Nick Craig Waller

    Ipex is drawing closer and optimism is in the air, writes Nick Craig Waller, marketing director of the premium print trade show, who has tips on how to turn your trip into a profitable experience.

    At the time of writing there are encouraging indications that by May when Ipex will open its doors for eight days, we will see the global economy begin to recover. However, recent findings from our Global Print Survey indicate that the majority of printers surveyed continue to worry about flat or declining sales. In addition to their sales trauma, they also cited increasing profit margins and controlling costs as the biggest issues facing their business.

    Like all the major exhibitions in the industry, Ipex provides an unrivalled opportunity to meet and talk with your suppliers, competitors and customers, and to see the equipment that will shape the future of your business. However, a visit to Ipex wouldn’t be complete without picking up some valuable business tips from industry experts as well.

    For the first time ever, visitors to Ipex will be able to take advantage of a new, free-of-charge training and seminar programme at the event designed to tackle the issues that keep most printers awake at night. Designed to accommodate up to 60 people, the Printers’ Profit Zone will offer dynamic and interactive Master Class sessions.

    Each Master Class will offer practical advice in the areas of growing sales, increasing profit margins and improving cashflow. The sessions are being run by Nick Devine, the founder of www.theprintcoach.com. The finance Master Classes will include experts from both inside and outside the industry. There will be four Master Classes a day on hot topics such as ‘Lead Generation for Printers’, ‘Compensating your Sales Team’, ‘Value-Based Selling’, ‘Wealth Protection’, ‘Raising Finance’, ‘Profitable Marketing’ and ‘Attracting Ideal Clients’.

    So, if you haven’t done so already, log on to www.ipex.org/register to pre-register for what we believe will be the most important Ipex ever. Arrange your travel, book your hotel, check out the excellent exhibitor line up and visitor features, and get ready to pick up some valuable business ideas that will help your business flourish.

  • Numbers up for PODi forum in Las Vegas

    The 2010 Print on Demand initiative (PODi) Appforum has opened in Las Vegas with a 20 percent increase in registrations and a strong focus on direct marketing.

    The conference, which is the US version of the Australian PODi Appforum held here September every year, is a chance for digital printers to share knowledge around direct marketing techniques and increasing customer value. A constant theme at PODi events is the need for digital printers to transform themselves into marketing service providers. 

    PODi president Rab Govil (pictured) told WhatTheyThink.com that the increase in registrations was an encouraging sign for the industry.

    “What we find is that attendance at our event is a very leading indicator how the economy’s going to do for the printing industry for the rest of the year. Since we are the first event in the industry, we find that if registration is down, the economy’s going to be a little slow because generally the printers are the first one to cut back,” Govil (pictured) said in a video interview on the WhatTheyThink site.

    “If we find that the registrations are increasing then in almost all cases we have found that the industry’s going to do very well. So I think everybody’s feeling much more positive.”

    Jeffrey Stewart, partner & CTO of Trekk Cross Media gave a presentation on the connection between social media and print, explaining how social media can be harnessed and integrated into “traditional” cross-media campaigns. Stewart’s presentation ignited the twit-o-sphere, with audience member Jamie Klemcke (tweeting as jlynnaggie) observing that “Brands are no longer in charge…word of mouth marketing returns. So true.”

     

  • Wellcom opens Singapore production unit

    New Australian CEO in place as Wayne Sidwell spearheads Asian expansion for marketing production specialists.






    Last week’s launch of a fully-fledged Wellcom marketing production unit in Singapore is the first step by the company to expot its business model into the Asian market. Founder and Chairman, Wayne Sidwell flew out this week to oversee the launch while announcing the hire of Amanda Brook, (pictured) as CEO in Australia and New Zealand.

    Wellcom Group’s entry into Singapore is facilitated by winning an in-house production contract with major retailer Courts. A complement of 12 production staff will provide Courts with all graphic arts and marketing services across multiple channels.

    Wellcom plans to open a Kuala Lumpur facility next month as part of its roll out into the rapidly growing market. It already has an overseas presence in the UK.

    Sidwell said the addition of Amanda Brook would strengthen the Group’s senior management team. “She is very well credentialed with a lot of good retail experience. I will be spending more time in Asia as we grow our business there, so it’s important to have extra management resources at home,” he said.

    Brooks has an established track record in technology communications as well as retail. Her last role with Sensis was as general manager mobile advertising. Previously she was with Sussan, Priceline, Officeworks and Myer. She is currently Chair of the Marketing Industry Advisory Board at Monash University, as well as being a Fellow of the Australian Marketing Institute.

    Wellcom Group has pioneered the marketing production services sector in Australia and New Zealand with over 30 inplant production teams in the marketing departments of some of the largest advertisers in the country, including Westpac, Australia Post, Woolworths, ANZ Bank, BP Australia and L’Oreal. It also has design hubs in every capital city with extensive digital and photographic studios as well as digital printing capability.

    Read the DIRECT interview with Michael Bettridge, strategy and global business development Wellcom.





  • Top honours for New Zealand print identity

    A lifetime of community involvement in and out of the NZ printing industry sees Murray Ferris, manager of Te Rau Design and Print, make the Companion of the Queen’s Service Order on the New Year Honours List.

    60-year-old Ferris (pictured) was “pleasantly surprised” when he learnt that he had made the Honours List. “It was a humbling experience – and anyone who knows me knows that I’m not particularly humble!” he said, admitting that: “It’s nice to know that people appreciate what you do.”

    In addition to his work with PrintNZ, Ferris is a driving force behind the Relay for Life Cancer Society, the Gisborne Car Club, school playground restoration and the Motu Environmental Trust and even playing Santa Claus in the school parade.

    According to Joan Grace, chief executive PrintNZ, Ferris has played a pivotal role in supporting apprenticeship training along with providing training opportunities to each of his 17 staff at the Gisborne-based Te Rau Design and Print.

    “Murray has been a regional representative of the PrintNZ Management Advisory Group for many years now and his contribution to PrintNZ and the print industry has been significant,” she said.

    “Murray has a larger-than-life presence and doesn’t hold back when offering his opinions and debating ideas.”

    Balancing work as a printer and work in the community is no easy task, but Ferris attributes support from colleagues and wife, Leslie, as the key. “The owner of Te Rau encourages me to do it [volunteering]. We’re a small community so we need to pitch in and help each other out,” he said.

    Beginning sweeping the floors aged 14 at his uncle, Max Stephens’ printing factory, Ferris went on to complete a book binding apprenticeship and has worked in the printing industry for 42 years. He has no plans of leaving anytime soon.

    “I’m passionate about printing and will stay in it as long as I have more good days than bad ones,” he said.

  • No-click digital print to expand the market

    Click charges and digital printing have been almost synonymous since the beginning. Now Steve Brown of Ferrostaal is intending to change the model when addressing commercial printers.

    The new digital division of Ferrostaal Australia is pioneering a radical break with industry digital practices with its range of Canon digital presses. It believes click charges are restricting the amount of work for digital print.

    The move into digital is part of an overall transformation of Ferrostaal in Australia under Markus Hafeli, CEO. An imminent announcement is expected to include the addition of a major offset press marque to the company’s range.

    The digital division was created some months go with the arrival of Steve Brown, ex-Canon. The new charging business model is something he has long advocated as a way of expanding the market for digital print.

    According to Brown, the cost of the average click charge is often greater than the toner cost on many one, two and three colour commercial printing jobs. By giving printers the ability to price according to real costs as opposed to click charges, the market for digital print substantially expands.

    “Click charges are restricting the digital print market,” he said. “With the new ‘no click’ coverage pricing model we are promoting printers can retain margins while aggressively expanding their market.”

    The business case recognises that there is much more to the cost of printing than click charges, such as the ongoing cost of buildings, labour etc. Brown has developed a job/cost simulation, based on operating the Canon C7000, C6000 and the Imagepress engines sold by Ferrostaal to allow printers to more accurately cost jobs.

    He believes many commercial offset printers are uncomfortable with the whole idea of click charges. By allowing them to have more control over the operation of their machines they can identify the hourly costs of their digital presses in the same way as their offset machines.

    In addition, E-maintenance oversight of the machines, especially in remote locations, allows the printer and Ferrostaal to cooperate on scheduling replacement parts. Printers can plan clear blocks of production time at a known cost.

    Ferrostaal will supply consumables, support and maintenance under contract or as required. The company is opening a digital showroom in Moorabbin, Vic, with a C7000 in place to demonstrate its new digital expertise. Steve Brown, ex-Canon, is well known in the industry and is one of the leading experts in Canon digital technology.
    He is currently putting together a team of 15 service people.

    The entry of Ferrostaal into digital printing is likely to be well received by the offset printing community. Apart from its radical ‘no click’ business model, it leverages its experience in dealing with the upper end of the offset manufacturing market. It is able to access the packaging and label sector as well as the large commercial printers.

    According to Brown, the Canon range is only the start of a complete solution that includes Objectiv Luna workflow and finishing equipment.

  • CeBIT Australia

    CeBIT Australia is the leading business event in the Asia Pacific region for information and communications technology.

    • Australia’s biggest ICT exhibition – with over 600 exhibitors and over 30,000 highly qualified trade visitors from Australia and overseas
    • CeBIT Global conferences – Australia’s most comprehensive and informative conference program providing knowledge transfer and information sharing for the ICT sector
    • Networking at the most senior level – only an event like CeBIT attracts industry and government leaders from Australia and overseas

    Getting the right mix of these three elements is the secret of CeBIT Australia’s success, and it means that:

    • CeBIT has the highest concentration of decision-makers in the ICT industry
    • Business leaders, politicians and scientists come together at CeBIT
    • CeBIT sets the agenda for Australian ICT industry
    • CeBIT provides the environment for thousands of business contacts, and subsequent business deals worth hundreds of million of dollars
    • CeBIT is one of Australia top technology media events of the year, attended by more business and ICT media than any other event
    • CeBIT generates an economic impact to the Australian economy greater than any other business technology event

    CeBIT Australia runs annually over three days every May, at Sydney’s Convention Centre, Darling Harbour.

  • LIA February Meeting

    Guest speaker, Phillip Lawrence, whose industry background is well known and whose academic research spans the past ten years will tackle the myths and facts of the impact of printed products on the environment.  His topic will be: ‘Print is helping destroy the planet … a convenient lie’.

    Whenever any large corporation or government wants to make a  statement to
    their stakeholders about the environment, predictably, the first thing they say
    they’re going to do is cut their printing requirements.

    The reasons why organisations act this way, is more to do with the fact that it
    sounds right, they relate printing to paper and paper to trees. For many people
    there is this seemingly logical link between saving paper saving trees and saving the environment. The truth is that the environmental problems facing the world are far more complex than such a simple solution could offer.
    Phillip Lawrence will endorse the proposition that printers are accidental environmentalists and that very few industries could compare so positively with how print has reduced its environmental footprint over the last 20 years.

    Bookings close at 12 noon on Friday 12th February 2010
    Members and Non members $40.00.
    Enquiries about this meeting to Bob Lamont  9876 4049 – 0407 914 156

  • Print myths busted at LIA seminar

    Paper evangelist, Philip Lawrence, tackles print myths at up-coming LIA event.

    In his presentation, ‘Print is helping destroy the planet – a convenient lie’, Lawrence will speak about the environmental benefits of print and paper and how to combat the public’s misconceptions that using paper is bad for the environment.

    According to Bob Lamont, chairman of the LIA, the event is an attempt to “even out the balance” and start setting the record straight. “One meeting is not going to do that but what we are trying to do is make people aware that the other means of [non-print] communication have hazardous and significant consequences when we come to recycling and so on,” he said.

    “Very few industries could compare so positively with how print has reduced its environmental footprint over the last 20 years.”

    Bookings close at midday on Friday 12th February 2010. Book now by phoning 02 8789 7322 or by email to theresa@printnet.com.au Members and Non members $40.00.

  • Fogarty takes out Fogra certification for Fuji Xerox

    Fuji Xerox takes out honour as second Xerox company to achieve Validation Printing System Certification.

    Following a week-long development workshop and two-day certification process conducted by Ulricht Schmitt of Fogra at the head office in Hainburg, Germany, certification was awarded to Gordon Fogarty, Fuji Xerox’s colour management services manager, on behalf of the company.

    Fuji Xerox Australia is the second operating company to achieve globally recognised accreditation for Validation Print. Xerox Austria was the first to receive this certification.

    “I am honoured to be one of only a handful of individuals who have received Fogra’s international mark of distinction for demonstrating the highest standards in print quality,” Fogarty said.
    Pictured: Simon Lane (left) with Gordon Fogarty.

    Fogarty believes that the certification will benefit Fuji Xerox’s customers. “[They] can now be assured that their materials can be printed with a defined quality. Even variable data documents can match the pre-defined standard,” he said.

    “This will assist our customers to meet the demands of colour accuracy for materials produced on digital equipment.”

    These thoughts were furthered by Simon Lane, national manager production services business at Fuji Xerox. “This certification will have lasting benefits, not only for our customers, but also for the industry,” he said.

    “Gordon’s expertise in meeting international ISO standards will ensure our customers can meet the stringent colour and quality demands set by some of Australia’s leading brands. It opens up a new world of print possibilities.”