Archive for October, 2012

  • Last chance for NSW and Vic PICA tickets

    Bookings close on Wednesday 31 October for the Employers Mutual 2012 NSW Printing Industries Craftsmanship Awards (PICA) being held this Friday 2 November.

    However, if you are in Victoria, you still have a few days left to get Tickets for their PICA event which is on the following Friday 9 November.

    The NSW PICA begins at 6.30pm in the Parkside Ballroom at the Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, Darling Harbour

    Comedian and popular TV House Husbands actress Julia Morris will MC the event which will include the presentation of print and business awards, an exhibition of entries and announcement of the inaugural NSW Media Super Future Leader Award.

    Membership awards including a special acknowledgement of one of the industry’s longest surviving companies along with announcement of the NSW Printer of the Year will also feature.

    Ticket booking forms for the NSW PICAs can be downloaded here. Inquiries to Mark Tolentino on 8789 7388 e-mail: mark@printnet.com.au

    Victoria’s PICAs will be held the following Friday at the Sofitel Melbourne on Collins Ballroom.

    TV celebrity Lauren Phillips (pictured), Ambassador for Country Racing and presenter of Channel 9 Postcards and A Current Affair will be host the Spring Carnival racing season themed event.

    Ticket bookings for the Melbourne event are available by emailing info@picavic.com.au , faxing details to (03) 9561 8780 or by downloading the booking form here

  • Issue 551 – 31 October 2012

    This week, the AMWU is demanding that Fairfax chief, Greg Hywood, ‘come clean’ on the real motivations behind the company’s print production closures; Heidelberg ANZ will close its Notting Hill press showroom in Melbourne in an effort to cut back on its local operation costs; and Penguin and Random House will combine their printing and publishing resources in a bid to strengthen their position in the global digital ebook landscape.

     

    This is your weekly printing news read by over 8,000 industry professionals in Australia and New Zealand. If you enjoy this bulletin but don’t receive our bi-monthly magazine, for a limited time you can get a free subscription to our print edition here.  We look forward to your tips and news items, so please continue to send them to us at NEWS

    You can also follow us on Twitter.

  • Issue 549 – 24 October 2012

    This week, Geoff Selig, former Blue Star chief and Caxton Web chairman, is rumoured to be in talks to buy the struggling company from Champ Private Equity; Bill Healey, Printing Industries CEO, says the NSW government’s $2 million print budget cut will hurt the state’s print businesses; and New Zealand newspaper veteran, Tim Pankhurst, replaces Joan Grace in Print NZ’s top job.

     

    This is your weekly printing news read by over 8,000 industry professionals in Australia and New Zealand. If you enjoy this bulletin but don’t receive our bi-monthly magazine, for a limited time you can get a free subscription to our print edition here.  We look forward to your tips and news items, so please continue to send them to us at NEWS

    You can also follow us on Twitter.

  • SWUG takes to the tropics for 2013 conference

    The Single Width Users Group (SWUG) is heading into the tropics for next year’s annual SWUG conference, which will be held at APN Print’s four-year old newspaper print facility in Rockhampton.

    Located just inside the Tropic of Capricorn, this will be the furthest north that the SWUG conference has travelled in Australia since visiting Mackay in 1992. Last year the conference was held at the Brisbane Exhibition Centre.

    Accommodation and conference sessions will be held at the Mercure Capricorn Resort on the Capricornia coast at Yeppoon, and the host site for the conference is APN Print in Rockhampton, which was opened four years ago in a purpose-built facility. It is home to a single width six-tower and two folder Manugraph Cityline press capable of producing 48-pages tabloid of back-to-back colour at 35,000 copies per hour.

    In fact, this conference will be the first to be hosted by a print site boasting a Manugraph press – one of only three in the country.

    Bob Lockley, SWUG president, says that the tropical destination represents a great holiday destination for SWUG members, and should help entice conference punters to travel north for the event.

    “Queensland is always a popular destination for delegates and the Capricorn Resort is an ideal venue, so make a note of the dates and book early,” says Lockley.

    The APN site itself will also provide a comprehensive setting for the conference, featuring an Agfa Polaris and a Krause LS Eco Jet CTP plate-setter, and two Müller Martini Alphaliner inserting lines capable of putting up to 8 inserts into newspapers at up to 17,000 copies per hour, in addition to its Manugraph Cityline.

    The site prints the six-day-a-week Rockhampton Morning Bulletin, which celebrated its 150th birthday last year as well as the dailies, Mackay Daily Mercury and the Gladstone Observer. Other newspapers produced at the site include the Rocky Mirror, Capricorn Coast Mirror, The Blackwater Herald, CQ News, and Central Telegraph.

    “This will be a unique experience for SWUG delegates at one of the most up-to-date single width sites in the country,” says Lockley.

    For Lockley, the event is designed not only to showcase some of the country’s top newspaper print equipment, but also highlight the strength of the sector’s apprentices.

    “It is important too that we continue to recognise the talent and hard work of our apprentices by entering them into the award and encouraging them to attend the conference,” says Lockley. “This is a great opportunity for them to learn more about the newspaper industry and to further their careers.”

    To this end, the traditional Sunday night gala dinner at the SWUG conference will also see the presentation of the annual SWUG Awards for Technical Excellence as well as the annual Apprentice of the Year award.

    The event will be held from Friday 22 March to Sunday 24 March 2013 at the Mercure Capricorn Resort on the Capricornia coast at Yeppoon. The closing date for all entries in the awards is 18 February 2013.

    Click here for more information.

  • Konica Minolta commits to its future in Australasia

    Celebrating its 25th anniversary in the Australian market the Japanese digital manufacturer reinforces its commitment to the local industry at a successful event in Darlinghurst.

    It was a night of saké-barrel busting, Chopin and well-meaning speeches from the Japanese Consul and the upper echelons of Konica Minolta management, both locally and from head office. Even Julia Gillard put in an appearance via a recorded congratulatory message. Finger-food, drinks and a convivial crowd of customers and corporates under the guidance of Stevan Caldwell, national marketing manager all combined to celebrate in the unlikely location of a former women’s prison block in the old Darlinghurst Gaol.

    Konica Minolta celebrated 25 years in Australia in grand style this week at the Cell Block Theatre, not only emphasizing its commitment to the local industry but also announcing it had taken up the major sponsorship of one of the country’s major art prizes, Redlands. Hiro Kaj, managing director, made a point of emphasizing how integrated the company has become in the local graphic arts industry as well as the broader community.

    He affirmed the company’s intention to remaining a long-term supporter and supplier to the Australian printing industry. He also announced that the company’s long-standing sponsorship of the Redlands prize goes up a level to where the prestigious competition will henceforth be known as the Redlands Konica Minolta Art  Prize.

    A brief history of the Japanese company’s technology achievements, a suitable number of laudatory speeches and a stunning piano recital by the very talented and beautiful Yuko Fujii, topped off an evening of recognition for one of the most active suppliers to the industry.

    Kampai: a celebrator group around the newly opened saki-barrel. (l to r) David Procter, general manager, Hiro Kajimanaging director, Konica Minolta Australia, Ko Hasegawa, general manager, sales headquarters Japan, along with Stephen Edwards and Simon Dodd of SNAP.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Caption:

    David Procter – General Manager

    Hiro Kaji – Managing Director

    Ko Hasegawa – Deputy Senior General Manager – Sales Headquarters Japan

    Stephen Edwards – SNAP

    Simon Dodd – SNAP

     

     

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  • When the money runs out – Print21 Magazine Feature

    Printing industry news in recent years has been filled with stories of companies going bust. But just how many businesses have gone under and how do you know if you are about to become one of the statistics? Alison Stieven-Taylor looks at the business of going broke.

    With printing businesses continuing to fall into financial trouble every week, the fiscal state of the industry is a hot topic. And while business owners scratch their heads trying to find reasons as to why they’ve landed themselves in the financial mire, statistics suggest that they need look no further than their own reflection to discover why their business is failing.

    According to the Australian Securities and Investment Commission (ASIC), inexperience in managing a business, lack of strategic capacity and inability to manage cash flow are the three key factors that beleaguer the small business operator in Australia, regardless of industry. In 2010, 43 per cent of administrators cited lack of strategic direction as the reason for business failure, followed closely by poor financial management at 33 per cent. The state of the economy rated 26 per cent, a statistic that has more than doubled since 2004 as a result of the GFC.

    Of Australia’s 2.1 million-plus businesses, 96 per cent are categorised as small businesses and, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), around 50 per cent of these will fail within four years. While this debunks the myth that the majority of small businesses go to the wall in their first year, the statistic itself is only representative of those businesses that fail and close, and doesn’t factor in the many that just limp along and barely make ends meet.

    In 2010/11, the number of new businesses in Australia grew by only 0.4 per cent across all segments. In the manufacturing sector, where print sits, the number of companies exiting the market was slightly higher at 11.6 per cent compared those entering (10.1 per cent), representing a decline in the number of businesses for the fifth consecutive year. As far as states go, while NSW and Victoria reported small gains in the number of businesses entering versus exiting, Queensland, South Australia and Tasmania all recorded falls.

    Greg Evans, director of economic and industry policy for the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (ACCI), says of the small business statistics released in the ACCI’s August report, “When you look at the small business sector it’s really in a hibernation or even survival mode at the moment… Small business isn’t borrowing, small business isn’t investing and small business isn’t employing.”

    Industries hardest hit by business closures have been building and construction, services, retail, accommodation and food, and the manufacturing segments. Specific statistics on closures in the printing industry are not easily secured, or defined, but according to Printing Industries, in 2007/8 the ABS reported there were 6,922 printing businesses operational in Australia. In 2010/11, this figure was 6,248, a fall of 674. In 2007/8, 908 companies exited the industry and, in 2010/11, there were 722 departures. The reasons for exiting are not just financial. Some business owners retire and close shop, but the vast majority exit because of trading issues.

    Low barriers a handicap

    According to Geoffrey Reidy, director of Rodgers Reidy , chartered accountants, the problem with industries like printing is that there is no requirement to have any business management experience to set up a printing shop, so the barrier to entry is very low. As a result, there are many companies that are being run by inexperienced operators who get themselves into financial trouble simply because they don’t have the business wherewithal to avoid the pitfalls.

    “I often see people who are very good in sales and think they can run their own business as a consequence,” says Reidy. “Sales are, of course, very important, but there are a lot of other issues a business manager needs to be on top of.

    “Also with printing, unless you keep up-to-date with the latest technology and market position, you can quite easily get left behind.”

    And being left behind can mean curtains, even for those who have been around for decades.

    “We had one company that had been in business for nearly 100 years, but without investing in new equipment and technology they went under,” adds Reidy.

    Reidy says the business management profile of the printing industry is not that dissimilar to that of the building and construction industry where, in NSW, the number of failures in that sector has become so great, the state government recently launched an inquiry. Each time one business falls over it has the potential to take a number of others with it and, in this sector, the devastation has been widespread amongst the small, unsecured contractors that populate the industry.

    According to Reidy, poor management can manifest itself in many different ways, from being extravagant when there is money in the kitty, to not knowing where the business is heading or keeping poor financial records.

    “A good manager doesn’t run on optimism. A good manager has control of the mainstream business and plans for future, while a poor manager drifts along in the ebb and flow and has no real idea of where the business is at.”

    Reidy says he has seen it all, from the profit and loss sheets that bear no resemblance to the true financial position of a company, to those companies that have traded on the premise of hoping for the best, only to be sorely disappointed that the good luck fairy didn’t sprinkle her magic dust on them.

    Tax debt spells trouble

    The terms insolvent, liquidation, administration and receivership all relate to businesses, says Reidy, while bankruptcy is an individual status. So what do these labels mean?

    In laypersons terms, a liquidator, administrator or receiver are all insolvency practitioners. The liquidator looks after debt on behalf of all the creditors. The receiver only looks after the secured creditors debt, such as the banks, and is charged with getting the best return for those creditors only. The administrator is concerned with the interests of all of the creditors. Most large companies go into administration to allow time to look at operations to see if there is a way the company can be sold or saved from liquidation, which means closing the doors.

    Moving from solvent to insolvent can happen in a matter of months and often starts with a company being unable to pay its tax bill. “There are lots of companies out there that might have huge tax debts, as an example, and they are insolvent, but trading on blind faith, optimism or stupidity that they will come out of it,” says Reidy.

    Of course trading whilst insolvent is an offence under the Corporations Act but Reidy confirms there are plenty of companies doing just that.

    “If these companies end up in liquidation, and the liquidator forms a view that the company was continuing to incur debts at a time when it was insolvent, then the liquidator can pursue the company’s directors via the court for debts the company incurred after the date it became insolvent,” he says.

    The first thing Reidy looks at when he’s doing insolvency work is tax and then superannuation instalments, both payments that companies often stop paying when they start to feel the pinch. Reidy says the tax bill is frequently the last to get paid, as the Australian Tax Office (ATO) is no longer viewed as a secured creditor.

    While most of us might secretly smirk at the thought of the ATO missing out, being unable to meet your tax bill should set off alarm bells, loudly. If you let your tax bill run out to three months behind, says Reidy, “You are most definitely trading whilst insolvent.”

    Signs of distress

    There are other signs too that things may be on the downward slide. Creditors should be current, but if the majority is drifting to 60 or 90 days that alarm bell should also be ringing. And if suppliers are stopping credit, says Reidy, this is a huge sign that something is amiss. He tells of one company that ended up being liquidated but not before the company had moved from one supplier to another as its credit was refused. “The director was on his third supplier by the time the company was wound up. He knew he was in trouble, but he continued to incur more debt.”

    Another factor that impacts the industry as a whole is the practice of quoting below cost to get work in the door in order to manage fixed costs. This is a road to nowhere, says Reidy, but is prevalent in industries where competition is fierce and margins low. And is detrimental to all, not just the company involved.

    The world of insolvency is full of stories that really defy understanding. In researching this article I’ve been told about company directors who take a second mortgage on their own homes or, even worse, on that of their ageing parents in order to prop up a business that has no hope of surviving. In the end they lose their shirts and everyone else’s at the same time. And what of the employees who have made salary sacrifices in order to help an ailing business, only to be short-changed as entitlements are lost in the wind-up? Or the directors who keep showing up on company boards despite their history of poor fiscal management? Or those who dip into their superannuation, often putting themselves in a precarious financial position at a stage of their lives when they can least afford it?

    The answer seems obvious. Don’t wait until you can’t pay your bills. Seek help to determine if you can steer a course to better days. And if not, then close up your shop before you have a pack of angry creditors after your hide.

  • Issue 549 – 17 October 2012

    This week, PMP chief, Richard Allely, gets a 12-month early mark and leaves the company in the hands of his COO, Peter George; Amcor offloads three of its Aperio manufacturing sites for $22 million; Ipex slams new drupa three-year cycle; and Heidelberg ANZ managing director, Andy Vels Jensen, gets ready to jet back to his native Denmark as his time with the company comes to an end.

     

    This is your weekly printing news read by over 8,000 industry professionals in Australia and New Zealand. If you enjoy this bulletin but don’t receive our bi-monthly magazine, for a limited time you can get a free subscription to our print edition here.  We look forward to your tips and news items, so please continue to send them to us at NEWS

    You can also follow us on Twitter.

  • GASAA “Surviving a business Disaster” Seminar

    Monday 5 November – A short seminar on “Surviving a business Disaster” followed by North Ryde business leaders networking evening .

    Learn how your business can survive disaster. Join Graham Nisbet, Managing Director from Continuity Planners Australia for an informative seminar on what can go wrong in any business and importantly how to plan to recover. You’ll also have an opportunity to meet and mingle with other business folk at the Ryde Business Forum’s After Hours Event.

    This seminar will address:
    • What would happen if your premises were hit by a disaster, be it a cyclone, power failure, fire, flood, computer disaster or flu outbreak?
    • Who will be your crisis management team?
    • What are the critical processes that you do in your usual business premises that will still need to be continued from an alternate location?
    • Is your information well backed up, kept off site and able to be recovered?
    • Will your website still be operational and could you update it easily?

    Come along on 5 Nov to learn the answers to key questions about your business continuity plan.

    North Ryde (venue TBC)
    $250 per company – max. 2 people ($100 per additional)
    Cost includes seminar and networking hour with Ryde Business Forum and other business leaders
    Register by Monday 29 October – email support@gasaa.asn.au or call GASAA on 02 8354 0602

  • Employers Mutual NSW PICA Awards – 2 November

    Celebrate the Power of Print – a visual showcase and recognition of the innovation, impact, creativity, care, pride and respect that separates print from all other mediums. MC is comedian and TV personality, Julia Morris.

    Get your giggle on at this year’s NSW PICAs with one of Australia’s most loved comedians, Julia Morris, who is back to host this year’s awards night in Sydney on 2 November.

    The straight talking queen of comedy has become one of Australia’s most popular entertainers since appearing at last year’s PICA event and then winning the Celebrity Apprentice reality TV show. Following that success she scoring a leading role in the new Channel Nine Sunday night dramedy (drama, comedy) House Husbands.

    Printing Industries national Director, communications and Marketing, Joe Kowalewski, says Julia’s television success has led to a flood of work offers.

    “Having her MC our 2012 awards is quite a coup as she is incredibly busy with television and theatre commitments,” he says. “But true to her down to earth persona, she enjoyed our presentation dinner last year and is looking forward to working with us again this year in spite of being in huge demand both in Australia and overseas.”

    The presentation night will be held in the Parkside Ballroom at the Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, Darling Harbour from 6.30pm on 2 November.

    Themed the Power of Print, it will also feature an exhibition of winning entries along with the presentation of 33 Print Category winners, Business Category winners, the Printer of the Year award, Long-term membership awards and the new Media Super Future Leaders Award.

    Ticket booking forms can be downloaded here. Inquiries to Mark Tolentino on 8789 7388 e-mail: mark@printnet.com.au

  • LIA Embellishment Dinner – adding value to print

    The LIA is embracing the resurgence of embellishment and other ‘craft’ technologies in the Australian printing industry with an industry dinner dedicated to the subject on 23 October.

    With traditional craft print technologies such as letterpress coming back into vogue, the upcoming Lithographic Institute of Australia (LIA) NSW division’s industry dinner in Sydney’s North Ryde will focus on several traditional embellishment technologies including embossing, letterpress, debossing and foiling.

    According to the LIA, these embellishments and enhancements are frequently driven by graphic designers and print originators who, in this era of digital print, are more than willing to pay for the additional value of the ‘handcrafted’ printed item.

    Adam Flannery (L) and Olivia King of local letterpress hero, The Distillery. (Image courtesy of The Distillery)

    The dinner will feature speakers from Graphic Design (AGDA), Embellishment and Letterpress Printing (Watermarx & The Distillery), and from Justus magazine, the ‘Almanac of Resources’ for graphic designers.

    The LIA says that Australia’s increase in demand of these traditional craft techniques is also being mirrored in the US, where there are now hundreds of craft print shops servicing the industry.

    The LIA embellishment dinner presentations will be followed by a question and answer session for guests to pick the brains of the night’s featured speakers, with the featured presenters providing samples of their craft work.

    You will need to get in quick to book, as the event closes for bookings on 19 October. To book, email Mike Williams at: mikewil@optusnet.com.au or fax your booking to Williams at: 02 96481256. The event will take place at the North Ryde RSL from 6 pm on 23 October.

  • Printers’ seminar final call – PIAA

    Bookings close at the end of this week for a Sydney lunchtime seminar to help printing companies to develop an innovation edge in client management.

    Seminar guest speaker Steve Tighe says printing companies needed to understand that innovation was not just limited to technology, but also extended into the sales and marketing areas with scope for companies to be innovative without having to outlay vast sums of money.

    Tighe (pictured) is a leading advisor to business on the future, strategy and innovation and is the former National Foresight Manager with global brewing giant Foster’s.

    He says printing company owners, managers, staff and customers needed to understand why consumer values, attitudes and behaviours were changing in order to meet the expectations of their clients.

    By being able to anticipate and respond to these changes positively, they could become more valuable to their own clients and create services to help these clients meet the expectations of their own customers.

    “It’s important that printing company managers be aware of consumer values and attitudes and how and why behaviours and needs are changing in order to work better with their clients,” says Tighe.

    He says it is crucial for companies to understand and develop innovative thinking to reposition their business away from the threats they may are facing and to identify where the opportunities lie.

    Bookings for the Printing Industries’ Planning and Innovating for the Future seminar, supported by Media Super, close at midday this Friday 19 October. The seminar will be held on Tuesday 23 October from 12.30pm at Dooleys Lidcombe Catholic Club.

    Tickets are $80 per person and can be made by contacting Mark Tolentino at Printing Industries on 8789 7388 e-mail: mark@printnet.com.au or by downloading the registration form here

  • Drupa Snooper-drupa every three years: can we take it?

    Print21’s Drupa Snooper, Andy McCourt, takes a close look at how a three-year drupa cycle could wreak havoc with Europe’s crowded printing trade fair circuit.

    As a card-carrying ‘Drupa Snooper’ it comes as no surprise to me that the quadrennial print media show looks set to become triennial. It has been one of the worst kept secrets in the global trade fair industry that Messe Düsseldorf wants to move to a three-year cycle.

    In more genteel times, an organization called Eumaprint ensured that major international print trade fairs did not clash in the same year. All the major expos were signatories to this, mostly through the trade associations who owned or part-owned the exhibitions. Ipex (UK), Print (USA), drupa (Germany) and Italian, Spanish and French trade fairs would all plan their cycles so no two shows occurred in the same year. In the late 1990s there was even an attempt for Pacprint to join Eumaprint through GAMAA.

    The synchronizing of trade fair cycles was primarily at the behest of exhibiting companies since staging such exhibits is both logistically and financially challenging. Evidence of this is clear with the withdrawal of Heidelberg from next May’s Pacprint, and Heidelberg, HP, Agfa and Kolbus from Ipex 2014.

    Now, it seems all bets are off as drupa owners Messe Düsseldorf know full well that by moving drupa to 2015 and then 2018, Ipex, if it remains on a four-year cycle after 2014, will clash in 2018. As a sideline casualty, the Spanish Graphispag expo due in 2015 will undoubtedly suffer.

    There is no way on God’s Earth that major printing equipment vendors can sustain exhibiting at two global trade fairs in the same year. For Australians and New Zealanders, there is little chance that both shows would be attended – it will be one or the other.

    Bearing in mind that Messe Düsseldorf is also the organizer of All In Print China, Shanghai which is on a three-year cycle and occurs in November 2014; it would come as no surprise if battle lines for access to exhibitors’ budgets have been drawn between the British and German trade fair organizers.

    The unholy mess that is the Eurozone at the moment has enabled Germany to rise to a position of economic dominance on continental Europe. Britain is seen as a pariah state by fervent Euro-centrics (“Britain uses Europe like a supermarket.” – French President), the five-decade long courtship of Britain becoming ‘truly European’ has progressed beyond niceties and dainty gifts of appeasement, and now seems like it will either become a shotgun wedding or return of the engagement ring; thrown somewhere into the middle of La Manche.

    I believe this is the psychology behind drupa’s decision to tackle Ipex head-on. The rule book has been torn up, Eumaprint is now toothless and anyway, Ipex is privately owned by the Informa Group after acquiring it from Picon (formerly the British Federation of Printing Machinery Suppliers). Drupa still has strong ties to the VDMA – the German print and paper technology association. With China now accounting for the majority of non-digital equipment sales by German manufacturers, pressure on budgets even for giants such as HP and the situation in Europe, Messe Düsseldorf sees an opportunity to quite possibly monopolise the international graphic arts trade fair calendar; and to blazes with Ipex.

    There is little question that drupa and for that matter K and Interpack, are very well organized and run. The town of Düsseldorf does a great job of embracing the influx of visitors at every level – from the free public transport to the smiles on the faces of barstaff and waiters delivering Pork Knuckles at Schweine Janes restaurant and other Aldstadt haunts. But Ipex has proved to be a terrific show also since it moved to the NEC, Birmingham and internationalized itself.

    Ipex 2014 will be a test of the decision to move back to London but having seen the Excel Centre used for the London Olympics and the way the Brits in general organized the Games, there is no reason to doubt that Ipex 2014 will deliver a great event with a totally different ambience to drupa. Losing HP, Heidelberg and Agfa are certainly blows but my view is that it’s a two-edged sword.

    The decision by a major digital and a major offset supplier not to exhibit at Ipex 2014 could also turn out to be major marketing disasters – the other edge of the sword. Already competitors are increasing their standspace – Konica Minolta has almost doubled its area, for example. For ANZ visitors in 2014, the familiarity with language and many family ties make the London stage convenient for extra-curricular activities.

    It’s going to be a ding-dong battle and we are still in the ‘phoney war’ stage. Ipex and IIR/Informa are mustering support and have already fired a broadside with the £1 million ‘Hosted VIP visitor’ programme – like high rollers being paid to visit casinos; key print executives will be flown in, accommodated and presumably wined and dined during Ipex. There’s more to come, make no mistake.

    Past chivalry between drupa and Ipex is just that – past. The game is afoot to see who will come out on top and, watching from our shores 16,000 kilometers away, it’s a gladiatorial spectacle but hey; we’ve got Pacprint combined with Visual Impact next May. After six Ipexes and seven drupas, that might just do me fine!

  • Julia Morris brings the laughs to NSW PICAs

    Get your giggle on at this year’s NSW PICAs with one of Australia’s most loved comedians, Julia Morris, who is back to host this year’s awards night in Sydney on 2 November.

    The straight talking queen of comedy has become one of Australia’s most popular entertainers since appearing at last year’s PICA event and then winning the Celebrity Apprentice reality TV show. Following that success she scoring a leading role in the new Channel Nine Sunday night dramedy (drama, comedy) House Husbands.

    Printing Industries national Director, communications and Marketing, Joe Kowalewski, says Julia’s television success has led to a flood of work offers.

    “Having her MC our 2012 awards is quite a coup as she is incredibly busy with television and theatre commitments,” he says. “But true to her down to earth persona, she enjoyed our presentation dinner last year and is looking forward to working with us again this year in spite of being in huge demand both in Australia and overseas.”

    The presentation night will be held in the Parkside Ballroom at the Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, Darling Harbour from 6.30pm on 2 November.

    Themed the Power of Print, it will also feature an exhibition of winning entries along with the presentation of 33 Print Category winners, Business Category winners, the Printer of the Year award, Long-term membership awards and the new Media Super Future Leaders Award.

    Ticket booking forms can be downloaded here. Inquiries to Mark Tolentino on 8789 7388 e-mail: mark@printnet.com.au

  • Issue 548 – 10 October 2012

    This week, SEMA’s axed workers are beginning to see their money, with the company paying its outstanding employee entitlements six months after it went into administration; GEON’s financier, BOS International, puts the company’s debt up for sale as part of a $400 million ‘distressed’ corporate loan portfolio; and new plain cigarette packaging hits the street with a splash of Pantone’s most ‘unappealing’ colour – 448C.

     

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  • Last chance for 2012 Dscoop workshop – 24 October

    Australian HP press users have one last chance this year to get to a local Dscoop workshop, with the final Australian Dscoop event for 2012 to be held on 24 October.

    The Australian branch of Dscoop (Digital Solutions Cooperative), the HP Indigo and Scitex users’ group, will be holding its upcoming workshop in central Melbourne, with the aim of teaching users how to use a number of software solutions to successfully implement workflow automation into their Indigo presses.

    Featured at the workshop will be one of Australia’s leading workflow automation specialists, Yves Roussange, director of Sydney’s ColourProcess. Roussange will encourage guests to have a close look at automation using SwitchBOX in conjunction with HP  SmartStream Designer Configurator and Aproove instant online approvals technology.

    Roussange will also outline a two-stop delivery process designed to facilitate ‘Client to Press’ architecture, with the ultimate aim of reducing the labour costs in prepress and digital production for HP users.

    Also presenting at the Dscoop event will be Iven Frangi (pictured), local sales and marketing expert. Frangi, who has a history with global one-on-one marketing company, the Peppers & Rogers Group, will help event attendees understand the value of delivering a “10 out of 10” customer service experience.

    According to Dscoop Australia, Frangi will, “share with you how every single touch-point of the customer experience provided to your clients can have a profound outcome on the relationship that you have with your customers today, tomorrow and into the future.”

    The workshop will be held on the afternoon of 24 October at 505 Little Street, Melbourne.

    To find out more, or RSVP, call (03) 9620 5808, or email: events@brainsells.com.au

  • $30 million helps the medicine go down for Colorpak

    Colorpak is feeling the effects of the Chinese health care system following the re-signing of a five-year, $30 million packaging deal with local pharmaceutical company, AstraZeneca.

    The $30 million re-signing deal comes hot on the heels of AstraZeneca’s $80 million investment on new machinery at its Sydney plant to keep pace with rapid growth in demand for a respiratory medicine from the Chinese health care system.

    AstraZeneca’s director of manufacturing and supply, Stuart Anderson, says that, as the pharmaceutical company invests in its manufacturing ability with the aim of becoming a major export hub to Asia, the new five-year deal with Colorpak will play an important part of burgeoning growth in exports to China over the next three years.

    “Our partnership with Colorpak is an important relationship in delivering the 500 per cent growth of exports that we will experience to China by 2015,” says Anderson.

    The five-year deal represents the renewal of an existing partnership between the two companies and, according to Colorpak managing director, Alex Commins, comes with an approximate value of $30 million over the term of the agreement.

    “We are very excite to have once more extended our supply partnership with one of Australia’s blue chip pharmaceutical manufacturers,” says Commins. “This is terrific news for our stakeholders and the broader Australian economy.”

    After recording a net loss of $3.23 million for the financial year ending June 2012, it is no surprise that Commins is working to reassure Colorpak’s stakeholders with the signing of this deal.

    However, it is not the only contract the packaging company has in the lucrative pharmaceutical sector. Colorpak also holds contracts with several other pharmaceutical companies including GlaxoSmith Kline, CSL and Pfizer.