Archive for July, 2014

  • Printing Industries Events update

    Two webinars were announced this week by Joe Kowalewski, communications director of  Printing Industries.

    The first on the practice of producing bar codes will be delivered by industry expert John Lane, Manager of the Bar Code Testing team who has overseen the testing of more than one million bar codes.

    This 30-minute barcoding webinar will feature GS1 Australia, the Australian administrator for the internationally recognised GS1 System. It will be presented by John Lane, Manager of the Bar Code Testing team who has overseen the testing more than one million bar codes. Mr Lane is widely respected and known within the printing and manufacturing industry for his detailed technical and practical knowledge.

    Register Here

    The second by Matt Davis is an Adobe update on recently added features of Creative Cloud.

    Mr Davis spent 11 years in the prepress industry with Show Ads and nearly 18 years with DDB Melbourne and DDB Chicago. He became North American Production Operations Director for Omnicom’s global production brand, Gutenberg Networks. After joining Adobe in November, he returned to Australia in January this year.

    Mr Davis prides himself on having global end-to-end, all channel production experience and a love of technology, Matt can teach a thing or two about building and managing marketing communications in the new digital age.

    Register Here.

    Bookings are now open for Printing Industries updated First Aid course scheduled in Sydney for Tuesday 30 September at the Association’s Auburn office.

    This is a full day, nationally accredited, practical and assessment based course. At the end of the course attendees will receive a nationally accredited First Aid Certificate, a wallet sized First Aid card and a 255 page First Aid manual.

    A self-study theory component is mandatory and must be completed before attending the training session.

    The course will be presented by Chris Cleary, who is well known for presenting previous Printing Industries’ courses. She  and has more than 20 years’ experience as a medic and 15 years’ experience in running first aid courses.

  • Industry first aid course opens in Sydney

    Bookings are now open for Printing Industries updated First Aid course scheduled in Sydney for Tuesday 30 September at the Association’s Auburn office.

    This is a full day, nationally accredited, practical and assessment based course. At the end of the course attendees will receive a nationally accredited First Aid Certificate, a wallet sized First Aid card and a 255 page First Aid manual.

    A self-study theory component is mandatory and must be completed before attending the training session.

    The course will be presented by Chris Cleary, who is well known for presenting previous Printing Industries’ courses. She  and has more than 20 years’ experience as a medic and 15 years’ experience in running first aid courses. Ms Cleary also volunteers with Community Medic where she provides first aid and mental health services to the homeless and has worked as on-site medic for popular reality TV shows such as The Bachelor and X Factor.

    The course will cover:

    •     Assessment and management of emergency situations and casualty
    •     Apply life support skills in accordance with Resuscitation Council guidelines
    •     Operation of automated external defibrillator
    •     First aid management for burns, bites, stings and poisoning
    •     First aid management of shock and respiratory distress
    •     Identification and management of bleeding and wounds
    •     Recognition and management of internal bleeding
    •     First aid management of Asthma, allergic reactions and anaphylaxis
    •     First aid management for bone and joint injuries
    •     Procedures for managing major and minor injury and illness
    •     First aid management for chest, abdominal, pelvic and head injuries
    •     The basic structure and function of the human body
    •     Infection control principals and procedures
    •     Provide an accurate verbal report of the incident

    Morning tea, lunch and light refreshments will be provided. The course cost is $140pp inc GST.

     Register here or call Steph Korpa on (02) 8789 7388. E: Stephanie@printnet.com.au

     

  • August Webinars on barcoding and Creative Cloud

    Printing Industries August webinars will focus on how printing companies can add barcoding as a new service and improve printed barcode quality (13 August) while the 27 August webinar will provide an overview of the new Adobe Creative Cloud software.

    This 30-minute barcoding webinar will feature GS1 Australia, the Australian administrator for the internationally recognised GS1 System.

    It will be presented by John Lane, Manager of the Bar Code Testing team who has overseen the testing more than one million bar codes.

    Mr Lane is widely respected and known within the printing and manufacturing industry for his detailed technical and practical knowledge.

    He said that that accurate reproduction of barcodes was essential. He said errors could be costly to printers both in time and resources and lost customer confidence.

    “Inaccurate barcoding can lead to loss of sales, items not being identified by retail auto-scanners, re-orders not being placed, items being de-listed by retailers and items being incorrectly identified,” he said.

    Register Here  for the barcoding webinar

    Printing Industries second webinar on 27 August presents an overview of what Adobe Creative Cloud is about and recently added features.

    This one-hour webinar will be presented by Matt Davis, a 29 year veteran of both trade graphic reprographic and global agency production environments.

    Mr Davis spent 11 years in the prepress industry with Show Ads and nearly 18 years with DDB Melbourne and DDB Chicago. He became North American Production Operations Director for Omnicom’s global production brand, Gutenberg Networks. After joining Adobe in November, he returned to Australia in January this year.

    Mr Davis prides himself on having global end-to-end, all channel production experience and a love of technology, Matt can teach a thing or two about building and managing marketing communications in the new digital age.

    Register Here for the Creative Cloud webinar

    All webinars begin at 1pm AEST and feature a 15 minute Q&A session at the end.

  • Commercial Notice – For Sale: One of Australia’s Most User-Friendly, Online Printing Websites, 31 July 2014

    The founders of Printing Wholesale have made a tough decision to put their online printing website up for sale, and refocus their energies into other ventures. While hard to let go, the founders realise this creates an undoubtedly rare and beneficial opportunity for established printing companies to increase their bottom line, with the ability to receive print orders online.

    From the ground up, Printing Wholesale was developed with the goal to make ordering print online as easy as possible for the client/user. The oversimplified pricing and ordering tool allows users to easily customise their orders from a vast variety of options (size, quantity, paper, finishing etc). All options are price sensitive and update with an instant quote, giving users the ability to place an order on the spot. All complexity is removed, no need to navigate through multiple pages, creating an enjoyable user experience. To proceed with an order users follow the systematic prompts, entering a delivery address, payment details and upload print ready artwork.

    Beyond usability, the website has undergone extensive search engine optimisation to encourage high volumes of organic traffic. For a period 6 months, one of Brisbane’s most sought after SEO firms assigned an incredibly experienced team member to devote 100% of their efforts to Printing Wholesale, significantly increasing search engine rankings.

    The emphasis of this sale is on the user friendly, optimised and packaged website for collecting print orders online. Saving the buyer enormous amounts of time, energy and costs, without the hassle of design, development, copywriting, photography, project management, SEO groundwork and more. The hard work has already been done. With nothing more to do, this becomes an appealing asset to every printing company that truly understands the importance of saving time and increasing revenue.

     

    Fast facts about the website:

    – 46 Extensively optimised webpages (not including cart, checkout and account pages).

    – 29 Blog posts, also extensively optimised for listed printing products.

    – 12 Variable printing products, with 1000’s of price sensitive combinations.

    – 1,500+ Email subscribers.

    – 575 Facebook fans.

    – 16,000+ All time visitors.

    – Taking orders since April 2013.

    – Website is 100% custom developed upon the user friendly OpenCart platform.

    – Includes a complete Client Management System making it easy to edit product options and prices.

    – Blog created upon the SEO friendly WordPress platform.

     

    The founders are currently taking offers above $40,000 from serious buyers. Co-founder Aaron Fifield is available to answer any questions you may have about the benefits of this platform on 0403 566 743, or by email at aaron@printingwholesale.com.au.

     

    To visit Printing Wholesale, please click here: www.printingwholesale.com.au

     

  • Future Print – Business transformation briefings

    The print industry is changing and Future Print is part of the transformation.

    The Government-funded programme is running a series of free, two-hour, ‘Transformational Briefings’ to help printing companies access the help and information required to adjust to the ‘new normal.’ Future Print is an initiative of the Printing Industries Association of Australia and the Australian Manufacturing Workers’ Union (AMWU).
    It is the industry’s strategy to develop the skills and capabilities of businesses in the print and related communications, creative and information sectors to respond effectively to meet economic, demographic and technological change.

    Register here.

    • 14 August Adelaide,
    • 18 August Hobart,
    • 19 August Launceston,
    • 21 August Melbourne,
    • 21 August Melbourne,
    • 26 August Brisbane,
    • 27 August Sydney,
    • 28 August Sydney,
    • 09 September Perth,
    • 12 September Adelaide.
  • Printing South China 2015

    Printing South China 2015 is the place to be to catch a whiff of how the vibrant and rapidly growing Chinese printing and packaging industry is going.

    Printing South China has a huge number of exhibitors, not only the big internationals such as HP and Heidelberg but  a swag of names you’ve never heard of viz Horauf, Fangbang, Cron, Huqiu, Guowei, Xinwei, Keqiang, Huayue, Zhongke, Tianceng, Zhengrun, Nanjiang, Chengming, Hongming, Dragon, Win.Win Digital, Shield.

    What do they produce? Well, for that you have to make the trip.

    China’s total printing industry output is expected to reach 440 billion euros in 2015; it has been outpacing the more mature economies of North America, Japan, and Western Europe over the past decade by increasing with a more than 10% annual growth rate, proving China remains to be the key market of global printing industry. South China, being one of the four major printing industry bases in the world, holds the most high-end printing technologies in China; with its immediate vicinity of locating at the heart of Pearl River Delta, it contains more than 60,000 printing enterprises that account for 50% of the country’s gross industry output.

    Printing South China claims it is the only international platform that comprehensively covers printing, packaging, labeling and packaging products. With the aim to provide the ultimate sourcing platform for buyers of printing, packaging and labeling, PACKINNO 2015 will be concurrently held to showcase various packaging products.

     

  • Nick Pond’s SA print safari – Print21 magazine article Part 2

    The story so far … Nick Pond, Print21 journalist, travelled to Adelaide to meet and learn from the printing professionals how to region was going. Last time he delved into digital print, this time he meets some more traditional players. Now read on… 

    When I left Print Junction, I headed across town to the team at Academy Photography are transitioning almost all their work to digital, and opening up exciting new products and opportunities in the process.

    ‘The South Australian printing industry is thriving despite tough times,’ Nick Pond.; Nick Pond

    One of Australia’s leading school photography providers, this family-owned business of 30 years employs around 170 people around the country and services an average of 50 schools every week.

    With such a hectic schedule and with all of the national network’s print work channelled through the its busy Adelaide hub, there’s a lot riding on the technology. Academy’s national print manager, John Bastoni, reveals that when it came to updating their equipment a few years back, the choice ended up being pretty straight-forward.

    “We did in-depth analysis of what was available at the time, and for its speed and pure print quality we went with the NexPress 2500. It’s picking up work off chemical photographic processing, so the fact that it can match that quality was hugely important. It’s backed up by two Konica Minolta C8000s here which look after our year-book production that goes hand-in-hand with school photography,” he explains.

    According to Bastoni and Academy’s operations manager, Stewart Alexander, since the Konicas landed the company’s year-book work has shot up tenfold and shows no signs of stopping. The digital technology has single-handedly transformed the business offering, with personalisation unlocking new products, adding value and opening up total package solutions that have become vital in these uncertain times.

    Keeping up with demand: Stewart Alexander and John Bastoni of Academy Photography with the Kodak NexPress 2500.

    “Going back 20 years the products in this space have stayed the same. Digital has allowed us to innovate, branch out into new areas and stay ahead of the competition,” says Bastoni.

    Holding up a digitally printed and bound year-book fresh off a C8000 he explains, “This process took us from producing this offline essentially. We used to have to print it, then fold it, then bind it. This is coming off as a finished product. Because of the way the market has grown, if we were doing it the old way it would be completely uneconomical and we simply would not be able to keep up with demand.”

    From school photos to TAFEshop to top-shelf print servicing the Australian market coast-to-coast, the digital revolution has driven businesses forward. The South Australian printing industry is thriving despite tough times, and the latest processes and technology are there to help cement its prosperous future.

    Quality that’s worth bottling

    While digital keeps on clicking along, the great southern state’s famous world-famous wine label market is still firmly rooted in traditional processes. David McCloud, director of Label Partners, agrees that the traditional process of flexographic printing is the way to go.

    Running a Gallus ECS-340 with cold foil and embossing, McCloud remains staunch in his commitment to a quality product, and with gold PICAs in the bag two years running it appears to be paying off.

    David McCloud sticks up for the old ways at Label Partners with his Gallus ECS-340 flexo press.

    “Gallus just delivers a quality of print, a quality of build and of back-up that you can’t go past. We’ve worked really hard over the years to keep on top of the label market, we’ve done it smart and the results are showing. Competition is fiercer than ever, and the business is growing,” says McCloud.

    No mean feat when, according to McCloud, the number of bottles being labelled locally has as much as halved in the past five years. With more and more converters packing into a thinning marketplace, business is getting even more cut-throat, and the latest kit is always going to be one of the best weapons.  As far as McCloud is concerned, Gallus delivers a product that holds its own in a tough market, and he has no plans to make the switch to digital any time soon.

    “We’re prioritising quality work on job numbers that suit the business size, and adding value with high-end finishing. The equipment we have delivers on all fronts and makes us competitive.”

  • Issue 641– 31July 2014

    Lots of new technology hitting the market at the moment. Konica Minolta lets loose its top of the range toner engines, while Jet Technologies brings the Screen Truepress to the market.

    On a more sober note the perils of financing growth through debt are once again in the spotlight with troubles coming in to roost for OPUS Group.

    You’re one of nearly 8000 industry professionals in Australia and New Zealand getting your graphic industry news from Print21. And remember, keep those news tips coming in.

    Patrick Howard
    Publishing editor

  • Konica Minolta breaks early with bizhub PRESS C1100

    New National Sales Director, David Procter, unleashes his top runners one month early as part of a strategy to contest every post in the digital print market derby.

    Upwards of 26 Konica Minolta sales agents from around the country thronged the company’s North Ryde offices this week for the ‘soft’ release of the flagship presses. With two versions of the completely new engine, one at 85 ppm and the other at 100 ppm, they are the vanguard of a determined assault on the toner-based printing market from the Number 2 supplier.

    Newly appointed National Sales Director, Procter, admitted the market had moved faster than expected, prompting a revision of his original plans to launch the new engines, bizhubPRESS C1100 & bizhubPRESS C1085, in September. Advancing the availability of the top of the range engines means Konica Minolta has now launched four new presses this year – the earlier C1070 and C1060 came out in May. Expect a blitz of persuasion and great deals as it piles into an already crowded market with its best shot.

    “These presses are a totally new design, built from the ground up and address an emerging market that will become more important,” said Procter, identifying the production values of the presses. “They are the ideal machines for printers currently doing up around one hundred thousand SRA3 impressions a month. They allow them to do more with one shift operation.”

    The two new engines incorporate all the best features of current technology; a lower fusing temperature that allows them to run even lighter stocks as well as plastics; rated speed is maintained on all weights up to 350gsm, simplex and duplex; an air-suction enabled paper handling system, similar to offset presses, means more reliability. With the addition of an optional inter-cooler curl eliminator printed sheets can be guaranteed completely flat in the delivery.

    The top of the range bizhubPRESS boasts a duty cycle of 200k per month, but Procter is confident it can go well beyond if necessary. He believes printers are getting better value now in the market than ever before.

    "Overall digital revenue is growing strongly," David Procter, the newly appointed national sales director, Konica Minolta Australia.

    “Look, the prices now are very realistic, printers are getting good value, especially compared to five or more years ago. We’re enjoying talking to our customers about the benefits of our products and the opportunities they open up,” he said. Ahead of the official launch in August and initial delivery in September, Procter and his team are busily taking orders for what he is confident will be a best selling season for the new machines.

    Mind you, he is likely to be even busier as he expands his responsibilities to include all of Konica Minolta’s sales functions. The new appointment as national sales director by Dr David Cooke, managing director Australia, recognises David Procter’s success in creating and building the company’s production printing business from scratch.

    “We have appointed David specifically for the strong leadership and energy he can bring to the sales function. He has an excellent grasp of the benefits our customers seek from print and workflow solutions, a skill that will be critical to the way we move forward,” said Cooke.

     

    bizhubPRESS C1100

     

  • Power take off for Jet Technologies Rosebery HQ

    1st Screen Truepress Jet in Australia stars at the new high-tech facility of leading label industry supplier as the digital label press market grows.

    The opening of the Jet Technologies new offices and showroom in Sydney last week attracted a wide range industry professionals. The wide range of people at the hospitable event reflects the eclectic mix of products, services and consumable supplied buy the company.

    A brand-new showroom for the company’s move into digital labels proved the central attraction celebrating Jet Technologies status as the distributor for the long awaited inkjet label machine. The press was airlifted to Sydney from Japan in order to make the opening date of the new showroom.

    Eddie Gulmen contributed a SMAG converter to complement the digital press enabling label converters to se a fully functioning label line. This is the first label production line showroom in Sydney for some time.

    “We were very pleased with the attendance. We had more than a hundred people here throughout the day and I’m confident we’ll get a good result, “ said Jack Malki managing director.

    The crowd was composed of sheetfed and packaging printers as well as label convertors. They came from all over; Brisbane, New Zealand and even a customer from Indonesia where Jet Technologies has a branch. The company has a busy schedule in the weeks ahead as clients bring in their own jobs for trials on the Truepress.

    The reception of the press and the Jet Technologies’ showroom was appreciated by Peter Scott, managing director, Screen Australia who had a complement of service engineers, software and workflow personnel along with Takaaki Taniguchi, Screen sales manager, in town for the launch. He commented on how some of the label printers he spoke with were happy to see the 50 metres a minute speed of the Truepress approach what they were used to with analogue printing.

    “A lot of people came to the even because they were curious but you can tell by the questions they ask when they become engaged. It was very successful for us,” said Scott.

    The move of Jet Technologies into digital labels represents a significant addition to the technology in Australia. The Screen Truepress Jet is up against the recently launched Epson Surepress, which has a head start in terms of numbers in the field. Other brands in the market include the EFI Jetrion and the locally designed Rapid’s mem-jet powered XL220. Gallus is currently developing a Fujifilm inkjet label press t be launched in September.

    Although not an inkjet technology, using electro-ink, the HP Indigo W-series is in digital label market leader in Australia by a long shot. It all signals a shift in acceptance of the technology among converters.

    malkis

    Picture 1 of 19

    The family Malki at the opening of their new HQ; (in front) Albert Malki, managing director, backed by Daniel, general manager (left) and Jack, director.

     

     

  • HK printer buys $51 million Opus debt for $20 million

    Fire sale of CBA debt ‘provides financial stability’ following Opus $35 million loss after tax for the six months ended 31 December 2013.

    1010 Printing Group has emerged as the effective owner of the heavily leveraged Opus Group by paying the Commonwealth Bank $20 million in due debt and standing in as the troubled company’s senior debt  provider for the remaining $31 million that falls due in 2016. The two groups have worked together as allies and competitors with 1010 operating a huge printing plant in Yuanzhou, Guangdong Province in China.

    The move was welcomed by Bill  Mackarell,  the OPUS Chairman  who said the Board  and  management  team  were pleased  that  1010  has given such  strong  support  for OPUS’s  business  by  committing  substantial  funds,  time and effort. He singled out CK Lau, co-founder and executive director of 1010, as someone the company has worked with over the years.

    “Some of  us  at  OPUS have  known  CK  Lau  for  a  while  and  his  impeccable  reputation  in  the  international   printing   industry   is   a   very   strong   endorsement   of  OPUS.  OPUS has been challenged  by  its  financial  structure  for  some  time  now  and,  once  we  arrive  at  a  suitable  financial  structure  we  look  forward  to  those  shackles  being  off  and  to  OPUS aggressively  pursuing  the  many  opportunities  that  are  available to it,” said Mackarell.

    OPUS and   1010   have   had   commercial   links   for   several   years   through   respective   senior management connections.  As the product  offerings  are  largely  complementary  and  in  many  cases  to  the  same  international  customer  base,  OPUS and  1010  have  consulted  from  time  to  time   on   business   initiatives   and   as   a   result   have   developed   a   mutually respectful  relationship.

    The takeover will undoubtedly result in some rationalisation of the Opus Group. However, calls to Opus in Sydney went unanswered.

    The deal goes into effect tomorrow July 31. According to the Opus press release,  by then it  is  envisaged  that  1010  and  OPUS will  have  agreed  on  new  terms  for  the  debt. As  soon  as  possible  after  settlement,  1010  has  advised  that  it  will  explore  possibilities to  restructure  the  debt  and  for  new  capital  to  be  injected.  1010  has  advised  OPUS that  it  expects the  discussions  [to] result  in  a  further  announcement,  which  will  set  out  the  basis  of  a  secure capital  structure  for  the  future.

  • Nick Pond’s SA print safari – Print21 magazine article Part l

    Every city has its own flavour, its own distinct infusion of culture and industry, and Adelaide is no exception. What are the quirks, challenges and achievements paving the way for the people of print in the deep south? Nicholas Pond heads to the City of Churches to find out.

    Let me be the first to raise a glass of fine Barossa Valley Shiraz and say, sweet Lord Adelaide, you are a sorely neglected gem. Well done, sir or madam. This was my first visit and as I stepped off the plane and was met by a crisp South Australian autumn morning, I was sold right there.

    "Let me be the first to raise a glass of fine Barossa Valley Shiraz," Nick Pond

    The region is rightly famous for its world-class wineries, rolling acres of lush vineyards rich with punchy whites and splashy reds, and then there’s the inimitable City of Churches itself. It’s steeped in history, and wears its heritage proudly alongside a bristling edge of innovation and change.

    And with that autumn bite on the wind, change was certainly in season as I set off to try and get a sense of the local printing scene. The blend of old and new was in the air, tangible, and nowhere more so than with the printers I met. As run lengths drop, printers are turning their attention to the latest processes and technologies to adapt and survive, and when it comes to Adelaide the digital revolution has found a rich crop.

    Finsbury Green grows digital

    Finsbury Green is an iconic name, not just in South Australia but nationally. Finsbury’s raft of print awards spills out over more than three walls in its spacious lobby. The family-owned business is built on the combined pillars of quality and its well-known dedication to environmental standards. Its heritage is firmly based in the offset world but, as national manufacturing manager Robbie D’Angelo shows me, the revolution has well and truly broken ground here too.

    “First and foremost, this company has been built on the reputation that we are a quality printer. Over the years we’ve embraced environmental accreditations as well, which are core to the business now, so when we made the decision to go digital it had to be in line with sustaining and maintaining those standards,” says D’Angelo.

    Powered by a Kodak NexPress SE3000, Finsbury’s digital division is thriving. Since it was set up three years ago, the division has gone from strength to strength with all the national network’s digital work coming through the Adelaide hub.

    My visit finds Finsbury in a state of transition, as the man who oversaw that crucial set-up and has guided the division through the years prepares to hand over the keys. Damon Hammond, digital production manager, looks back on his accomplishments over the past three years, and reveals some of the challenges and triumphs.

    The passing of the torch at Finsbury Green: incoming and outgoing digital division managers, Chris Monteleone and Damon Hammond, hand over the keys to the Kodak NexPress SE3000.

    “I moved here from Brisbane for the opportunity to set up something from scratch. It wasn’t just setting up a digital department, it was working to integrate it with the existing offset mindset, which was a challenge in itself,” says Hammond.

    “It’s more than just picking up work and adding value, I think it’s actually helped drive change across the board. Digital has brought a lot of automation which now we’re trying to move into the rest of the business.”

    In fact the digital division hit capacity late last year and has just ratcheted up to two shifts, opening up new jobs and opportunities. Hammond leaves the digital team in the safe hands of Chris Monteleone, a Finsbury man for 18 years who is keen to pick up the ball and keep it moving forward. For Hammond, though, the success of digital for Finsbury Green speaks for itself.

    “I’m very proud,” he says. “It’s turned out well. It’s been successful, it’s been profitable and it’s growing.”

    Tender moment for Reflex Printing

    It’s not the biggest shock to see an offset printer branch out into digital but Mark Frankcom, owner and founder of Adelaide Digital, tackled the issue from quite another angle. Frankcom was running the straight digital set-up and turning a tidy profit until four years ago he went the other way entirely and bought up Reflex Printing, a mostly offset operation.

    “It’s been an interesting transition,” he admits. “Digital leads the business for me, no question. The offset side is flatter, but what it’s done is complement my digital by allowing me to do a wider variety of work, basically.”

    The move has seen him grow the company from a staff of four to fifteen, and bring on new business opportunities. Crucially for Frankcom both operations play to their strengths and stand up on their own, as well as meshing easily to add value for customers.

    In fact, Reflex Printing has only just finished upgrading its digital arsenal, with the spike in short-run, tight-turnaround work driving more and more business its way. A Konica Minolta man, Frankcom says that his brand new pair of C8000s are already well and truly earning their keep.

    One of two new Konica Minolta C8000s powering Mark Frankcom’s own personal digital revolution out at Reflex Printing/Adelaide Digital.

    “They’re replacing two C6500s that we’ve had for about five years now. Moving up to the 8000s was a no-brainer, the quality, the registration and the speed are all a step up. It means we’re able to handle more throughput and deliver the highest quality work on the market,” says Frankcom.

    It’s an investment that has already soundly paid off, with Reflex landing a new government tender. A major coup for the team, the deal covers coursework material for TAFEshop nationally, as well as all TAFE general printing for South Australia.

    Frankcom has confidence in the technology at his disposal and the support he can rely on to get the job done.

    “The service department in Konica Minolta smashes the competition. It’s just the attitude they’ve got. They look after you, they’ve got that ethos. And they have enough techs out there to cover it. It means we can go after these sorts of jobs and know that support is going to be there.”

    At the junction of offset and digital

    Leon and Sheila Torzyn head up another family-run Adelaide business embracing the digital revolution head-on. Running twin Konica Minoltas, a C6501 and C7000, alongside a four-colour Heidelberg SM-52, Print Junction has refined its specialised offering to target short-run books and brochure work. After 18 years in the business, Print Junction has successfully grown from a pure offset shop to a fully-equipped digital design studio.

    “With us starting out just offset, the test with digital was matching the print. Customers don’t care whether it’s digital or offset, they just want it at the highest possible quality,” says Leon Torzyn.

    “That’s why we went with the Konica gear. The ink on paper closely resembled the offset offering. That’s where we wanted to be, so it allows us to transfer work between the two. It’s got terrific output.”

    “You gotta know when to fold ‘em…” Leon and son Nathan Torzyn unpack their Horizon BQ-280 PUR binder.

    That output has helped land the business work with headland brands from Qantas and Wesfarmers, through to printing Indigenous Business Australia’s quarterly magazine Inspire. As an indigenous Australian-owned company itself, Print Junction has formed particularly close ties in the community, balancing that line between national service and a traditional community printer.

    Up until four years ago, local walk-in traffic still made up a healthy mix of Print Junction’s business, but work on the city’s first elevated South Road Superway all but put an end to that. With construction effectively cutting off direct access, Print Junction’s digital flexibility became vital for its survival.

    “We used to have three banks right out the front. They left when the foot-traffic stopped, that was about four years ago. That’s when we really focused on broadening our horizons. The digital work, online ordering and digital print management were crucial, but because of the way our business had been developing we survived. And now we’re growing,” says Torzyn.

    Step up to the crease

    As run lengths continue to shift, more and more of Print Junction’s booklet work has transferred across from offset. This has opened up print finishing as a growing priority for the business, and for Torzyn the answer was simple. It came on the back of a truck – the day the Currie roadshow came to town.

    Riding out the digital revolution in style, the Horizon BQ-280 PUR binder has been a showroom centrepiece throughout the Currie roadshow’s epic cross-country trek, and its Adelaide stop-off was no exception. With his new Horizon landing the very morning of my visit, Torzyn is still getting the engines running, but for him it’s a logical progression for the business in the current climate.

    “We know where we’re at with the smaller runs, and that’s pushed the drive through to digital print finishing equipment. These have been built to prevent toner from cracking and to give the appearance on the folds of a nice, crisp, clean, clear fold. It opens up whole new opportunities for us,” he says.

    Maintaining quality standards: Robbie D’Angelo with Finsbury Green’s new Horizon BQ-280 PUR binder.

    And Print Junction aren’t the only ones expanding their digital Horizons. The team out at Finsbury Green are also just christening a brand new BQ-280 PUR, also fresh out of the Currie mobile showroom. Finsbury’s Robbie D’Angelo fills me in on the increased demand across the state fuelling these crucial purchases.

    “We’ve invested to bring this equipment in-house to really maintain our quality standards. It gives us a better control of the overall product. People are ordering shorter and shorter runs for booklet runs, brochures. It makes sense for that work to go digital, and as those jobs grow we need to be able to finish to the same level. We put in the PUR binder a week back, and we’re potentially even looking at a new machine to complement the NexPress,” says D’Angelo.

    Next time Nick meets John Bastoni, print manager at Academy Photography as well as dropping in on David McCloud of Label Partners

     

  • Issue 640– 25 July 2014

    ‘History is mostly bunk,’ said Henry Ford, but he was only half right. I think it matters how we got to where we are, as people and as an industry. So it’s nice to see the LIA – that’s the Lithographic Institute of Australia for those who came in late – fixing to celebrate half a century of industry activism in August. They’re a lovely bunch of fellas and I, for one, am very pleased to be able to attend.

    You are one of almost 8000 industry professionals reading Print21 in Australia and New Zealand.

    And remember, keep those news items and tips coming in.

    Patrick Howard
    Publishing editor.

  • Vistaprint’s Aussie plant gets Shingo gong

    Continuous improvement institute honours Deer Park web2print facility for world-class results and a strong culture of operational excellence.

    The award is the first time a printing company worldwide has been recognised for its operational excellence. Having opened in 2010, Vistaprint’s Victorian plant is also one of the youngest ever to receive the award.

    Robert Bruce, managing director Vistaprint, greeted the award as vindication of the company’s long-term strategy to excel. “Right from launch our plant in Australia established a clear vision – to become the best mass customization manufacturer in Australia. The keys to our success have been establishing a clear and long term vision, assembling an amazingly talented and dedicated team here in Melbourne, setting the bar high from day one; and providing continual encouragement and support to the team in order to bring our vision to life.”

    The company’s Deer Park facility is one of five manufacturing plants that Vistaprint operates across the globe. The company focuses mainly on small and highly customised orders, often in single digits directly to customers. Sophisticated automation systems reportedly allow most of the orders to be fulfilled without human intervention. (The company is notoriously shy about allowing media access to its plants.)

    "Improvement is a journey," Gareth Ward.

    Gareth Brown, Deer Park plant director reckons creating a great place to work has helped the entire team stay focused on the goal. “We recognize that improvement is a journey and there is still much work to be done. Receiving a Shingo Award is a significant milestone that validates we are moving forward in the right direction.”

    Vistaprint employs over 4,400 people worldwide, operates more than 25 localized websites globally and ships to more than 130 countries around the world. Vistaprint’s broad range of products and services are easy to access online, 24 hours a day.

    The Shingo Institute at Utah State University is named after Japanese industrial engineer Shigeo Shingo who distinguished himself as one of the world’s leaders in developing the management systems and improvement techniques that have become known as the Toyota Business System. It educates leaders about developing an organizational culture that continually strives for improvement and progress.

  • LIA’s 50th Anniversary Celebration

    Lithography: from Greek λίθος, lithos, ‘stone’ and γράφειν, graphein, ‘to write’

    Some 50 years ago Lithography was an emerging technology that was rapidly climbing to first place in the Australian printing industry. This method of printing came with inherent challenges as letterpress printers grappled with the principle of oil and water not mixing and the transition from a raised letterpress plate to a metal plate with a smooth surface. Invented in 1796 by German author and actor Alois Senefelder as a cheap method of publishing music and theatrical works, lithography has become the leading technology used by commercial printers around the world.

    Early in the 1960s it was clear that a forum was needed, in which printers and suppliers could meet together in a formal setting, to share information. A small group of Sydney industry identities started the first Australian Litho Club, which later became known and registered as the Lithographic Institute of Australia, the LIA.

    The LIA has now turned 50 years old, and is focused on the whole spectrum of graphic technology and design. The members of the Institute plan to celebrate this milestone in style.

    All ex-office bearers, members and industry friends, old and new, are invited to a special anniversary dinner, including a wine appreciation, and an historical account of a wonderful journey.

    Event details and contact here.

    They do know how to enjoy themselves: Graduates celebrate at the LIA-Heidelberg 2013 Graduate of the Year Awards

  • LIA’s 50th Anniversary Celebration

    Lithography: from Greek λίθος, lithos, ‘stone’ and γράφειν, graphein, ‘to write’

    The LIA has now turned 50 years old, and is focused on the whole spectrum of graphic technology and design. The members of the Institute plan to celebrate this milestone in style.

    All ex-office bearers, members and industry friends, old and new, are invited to a special anniversary dinner, including a wine appreciation, and an historical account of a wonderful journey.

    Bookings close at 12 noon Monday 11 August 2014

     

     

  • Trade label printer gets 1st Rapid XL220

    Scott Fredman is kick starting a revolution at Evolution where a new business concept for the label industry will be powered by the Nick Mansell’s latest memjet-powered press.

    It took over two months for the identity of the inaugural press buyer of the Australian-developed high-speed label press to be announced. According to Fredman, the primarily trade-only label converter wanted to keep the investment quiet while it was putting the finishing touches to a new business model.

    “We have been developing a new business concept for the label industry here in Australia and wanted to remain below-the-radar during this phase. We are now ready to roll and the XL220 is central to our vision for on-demand short run, full colour labels printed on-time, with minimum fuss and delivered to trade label printers anywhere,” he said.

    “Our primarily trade-only model means that conventional label printers can accept orders for short run quality labels that are not economical to put onto a flexo or offset press, without the need to invest in new plant and digitally-skilled labour.”

    According to Nick Mansell, Rapid general manager, the business relationship between Evolution and Rapid is long standing and mutually supportive. “We have known and done business with Scott for over 20 years and he has provided trade label printers with fast, high quality, simple and low cost solutions with his previous business, now sold,” he said.

    “With the XL220 he has created Evolution Labels which, as the name implies, takes short run label printing to the next level as a trade service.”

    Done deal: Nick Mansell and Scott Fredman shake on the deal.

    The Rapid XL220 is an inkjet digital label press with multiple finishing and converting options. It produces full colour labels on a variety of inkjet-receptive stocks, in vibrant colour and with stunning resolution up to 1600 x 1600dpi using the Australian-developed Memjet printheads and inks. The web width is 220mm, traveling at up to 18 metres per minute.

    The unwind and rewind stations are built to Rapid’s renowned engineering standards and the base model XL220 has inline die-cutting, matrix stripping and lamination if required. Additional modules that can be added include flexo coating, cold foil embellishing, embossing, slitting and spot coating. An RFID converting station is under development.