Archive for September, 2016

  • Issue 847 – September 30

    It’s easy to become overly focused on digital printing technology at the expense of offset. The vast majority of printing is still performed on offset presses. Depending on the figures you cite, digital accounts for something less than 10% of the overall volume. Of course, its take of the number of actual jobs is far higher.

    We’ve seen a massive drop in overall printing volumes this century, but printers know that offset investment still makes good sense when the business is there.

    Welcome to your latest issue of Print21, the premier news and information service to the printing industry across Australia and New Zealand/

    Patrick Howard
    Publishing Editor.

     

  • Voting begins in PIAA board elections

    (l-r) Peter Orel, CEO Finsbury Green (Victoria); Peter Clark, founder AIW (Tasmania)

    Voting is underway in the PIAA board elections, with members in Victoria and Tasmania choosing between two candidates on the ballot in each state.

    We spoke to two candidates who weren’t available for comment on Wednesday when the ballots were announced. 

    Finsbury Green CEO Peter Orel, who’s running in Victoria, and AIW Printing founder Peter Clark, on the ballot in Tasmania, both called for more focus on the membership.

    Orel and his brother Mark co-own Finsbury Green – a leading marketing services, printer and logistics provider described as Australia’s premier green printer.  He’s been with the company for over 30 years and CEO since 2007.  Finsbury started in 1984 with nine employees and has expanded to a staff of 160 operating in three states.

    Orel, who is running  against former PIAA Victoria state secretary Ron Patterson, says he threw his hat into the ring only after the last minute withdrawal of Victorian-based board member Kellie Northwood.

    “I decided to run primarily because Kellie Northwood decided not to run. While Kellie was there I was confident in her ability but in her absence I believe I can add value to the board because of my experience in our business and the industry and also as a board member of Two Sides Australia.

    “I want the PIAA to provide appropriate industry services so that existing and prospective members can see the value in membership. I’d like to sit down with other board members and look at potential gaps in the services and discuss a strategic plan to address them. And I’d like to help the board continue down the road they’re on in terms of managing change for the industry.”

    Tasmanian nominee Peter Clark, just back from the ASEAN newspaper printers conference in Vietnam, says he’d like the PIAA to launch a membership drive in his state.

    “We’re a small state of about 500,000 people but we have lots of potential members and I’ll be knocking on their doors in the coming weeks to try to get them interested in joining up,” says Clark, who’s on the ballot against Martin Guilliamse, GM of Hobart’s Mark Media.

    “Tasmania has about 20 members currently and I’ve probably spoken to about a quarter of them but I plan to get around to all of the members and hear what they want from the association.”

    Clark, founding director of AIW Printing and now semi-retired, says his 50 years of experience in the industry would be an asset to the PIAA. “I’d like to help printers in Tasmania with their issues and I believe my experience and knowledge will be valuable. I know a lot of printers are concerned about the proposed changes to the parallel book importing laws and they’re passionately against the move to online transactions for things like bank statements and invoicing.”

    Clark moved back to Tasmania a couple of years ago after 38 years in Melbourne but he continues consulting work for AIW Printing, where his son Richard is now CEO.

    The ballot opened on Thursday, 29 September 2016, and closes at 10:00 am (AEDT) on Thursday, 27 October 2016.

    All seven sitting PIAA directors who sought reappointment have been returned unopposed. They are: Kieran May – ACT; Matt Aitken – NSW; Walter Kuhn – Queensland; Peter Lane – South Australia; Graham Jamieson – Western Australia; Chris Segaert – National; John Scott – National.

     

     

  • Esko boosts Melbourne flexo supplier

    David Simpson Graphics (DSG), a prepress supplier to the flexographic printing industry, has enjoyed a dramatic lift in business after providing its staff with the latest Esko solutions.

    DSG supplies a wide variety of prepress solutions to businesses nationwide that includes HD Flexo plates for wide web and label; specialized plate mounters for corrugated plate mounting; Epson digital proofing systems; and screen print film and thermal imaged film; dry offset plates; varnish plates for offset and for letterpress platemaking; and conventional flexo plates for corrugated printing.

    Steve Barron, GM at DSG, says the company uses the Esko CDI 4260 for high definition flexo platemaking. “We have an Esko workflow, the latest version. We are on a service contract so we keep up to date with all the latest versions of the software packages. In relation to the Spark CDI, we see that as the industry standard. It allows us to make high definition plates on any material and in-house. We are not locked into one brand of plate.”

    Designed to address high-quality flexo applications, the CDI Spark 4260 is positioned in the flexible packaging and folding carton markets, with inroads also in corrugated.

    (l-r) Wendy Simpson and Steve Barron from DS Graphics

    “Our relationship with Esko goes back to 2000, when we started,” says Barron. “We have had an Esko workflow from the start. We started with an Esko image setter and the Spark is our latest purchase. This has helped us dramatically. It has opened up new business for us. This helps us service the wide web and label customers especially high-end label printers.

    “The Esko equipment is a big part of our plans for the business to grow. We look forward to offering the printers nationally with high definition printing plates and quality prepress. Based in Melbourne, we service the whole country. Our plates go all around Australia.

    “The prepress side of the industry has consolidated over the past few years. For us, we base our ongoing success on our service quality and the Esko equipment remains a strong component in that. Of course, our greatest asset is our professional staff. Any successful business needs highly professional, highly trained, and highly knowledgeable staff members.”

    Barron says the company’s membership in the Flexographic Association is a key part of keeping up with latest trends and technology. “We are a part of the Flexographic Association which has combined with LATMA and the membership keeps us up to date with what we need to know, especially with workshops and forums.”

    Belgium-based Esko is a global supplier of integrated solutions for the packaging and labels, sign and display, commercial printing and publishing industries.

     

     

  • Melbourne edition of The Advertiser

    Thursday's edition of The Advertiser

    The Adelaide blackout forced News Corp to take the ‘unprecedented’ step of printing The Advertiser newspaper in Melbourne and trucking it to Adelaide overnight.

    Power across South Australia went out just before 4:00pm yesterday and prevented the printing of the Thursday edition of The Advertiser at the Adelaide Print Centre. Staff were putting together the paper when the presses at Mile End were completely shut down.  A back-up generator allowed the paper’s website and the newsroom to continue operating on half-power.

    'Rain, hail or shine': Dan Demaria, GM marketing and circulation

    “We made the unprecedented decision to print as many newspapers as possible in the News Corp Melbourne print plant and truck to Adelaide overnight,” says Dan Demaria, GM of marketing and circulation, The Advertiser. The trucks were due to begin arriving in Adelaide at around 9:00am today.

    When power came back on at the Adelaide Print Centre at 10:30pm last night, the paper decided to print home delivery copies there, with left-over copies sent to retail outlets this morning.

    “We are endeavouring to deliver as many newspapers as possible to a number of retail outlets from 9am Thursday. Delivery is also expected to be impacted by further extreme weather expected to arrive Thursday morning, says Demaria. “Regrettably, we have been unable to deliver to our country customers due to the extra delivery time required or home delivery customers given that our Melbourne plant lacks the ability to flat wrap newspapers.

    “Rain, hail or shine we — and our distribution partners — will get as many newspapers into the hands of as many readers as possible.”

    Overnight TV ratings show Seven News drew 1,000 viewers in Adelaide while Nine News recorded a zero figure, with almost everyone in the State unable to watch TV, according to a report in Mumbrella.

     

     

  • Two Sides launches VoPP magazine

    The inaugural issue of VoPP Mag

    Two Sides Australia launched its own magazine to celebrate “the value and effectiveness of paper and print.”

    VoPP Mag is a mixture of Australian, New Zealand and international content exploring how print is being used to drive successful marketing outcomes.

    “From our research, we know print is an effective media channel and we wanted to provide a publication for our members to promote their channel,” says Kellie Northwood, executive director, TSA Limited. “Having said that, the magazine is not targeting printers. We have built articles that resonate with marketers, creative agencies and media buyers to raise awareness around some of the most successful campaigning using print.”

    The magazine includes interviews with the editor of Australian Vogue discussing why Vogue is a powerful print publication and looks at positive outcomes achieved through the marriage of digital and print. VoPP Mag also explores how brands are using print as part of their multi-channel marketing strategy, and looks at digital brands using print to increase reach and credibility.

    “To excite our readers, we filled the issue with thoughts and insights from people the readership trust – marketers, agency heads and business leaders,” says Victoria Fratin, editor, VoPP Mag. “Inspired by the latest news, research and trends in the world of print, media, advertising and marketing, the VoPP Mag celebrates successful campaigns to stimulate new ideas and ignite a conversation with our readers.”

    “With 72% of readers influenced by content in magazines, we thought it was time our members had their own publication to spark new dialogue with their customers and prospects,” says Northwood.

    The VoPP Mag is a bi-annual publication, with over 10,000 distributed across Australia and New Zealand, published in September and March.

    TSA Limited (TSA) is a not-for-profit industry-funded organisation developing sales and marketing campaigns to promote the paper and print industries. Two Sides is part of a global initiative by companies from the Graphic Communications Industry including Forestry, Pulp, Paper, Inks and Chemicals, Pre Press, Finishing, Publishing, Printing, Envelopes and Postal Operators.

     

  • Why does the future take so long to arrive?

    In late 1971, a computer engineer named Ray Tomlinson sent the first email message. It was ten letters long (QWERTYUIOP) and he was probably oblivious to the fact that hitting ‘send’ would gain him entry into the history books. Tomlinson’s invention changed the course of communication forever – usurping technology such as the fax. 205 billion emails are sent every day, and this will reach over 246 billion by the end of 2019.

    Yet, the email hasn’t yet usurped the ‘paper trail’ and truly paperless systems are few and far between.

    Paper stubbornly remains a feature of our everyday lives. Decades later, the paperless office is being called a ‘30-year old pipe dream’ and the United States Postal Service still processes and delivers 509 million pieces of mail each day. There is no doubt that the reliance on paper is decreasing, but we are still years away from actually achieving the paperless nirvana we were promised.

    If paper is stubbornly sticking around, what does this mean for other technologies that are supposed to eradicate the problems of the past and deliver to us utopian efficiency and productivity?

    Is it a harbinger for all things ‘paperless’, such as paperless money? Bitcoin (the world’s first digital currency) claims that it will change finance in the same way the web changed publishing – yet, we have had credit cards for decades, and many still carry cash.

    Why can’t we let go? What will it take to ‘kill’ analogue systems off once and for all?

    Technology is not ‘yet’ ready

    The tools for going paperless are both accessible and economical; you can easily scan a key document and save it in PDF format; e-books can be downloaded and read through myriad digital devices; and receiving all of your bills via email is a cinch. But while this technology has come a long way, it still has an uphill journey to be truly ‘ready’.

    Paper does not need reboots, passwords, or charging. Paper notebooks do not ‘crash’. Bic pens are ready to write, whether you have 4G connectivity or not. With paper, there is no system to learn and shortcut keys to memorise. Alexa needs to be plugged in, while Siri, Cortana and Google Now can’t doodle.

    The transition of paper to electronic document has not solved the issue of content chaos. We are still trying to remember which folder we saved that contract in. When the system fails, which is unpredicted, we easily fall back on paper and legacy paper processes. In addition, the reality for some organisations is that there are multiple touchpoints in the workflow that remain analogue.

    Coupled to this, many have said that the practicality of paper is hard to beat on project sites; it is disposable, easily replaced and you can edit (using a red pen) as you please. Decades have passed, and the use of paper still feels natural and inherent.

    In the words of Getting Things Done author David Allen, “…the easiest and most ubiquitous way to get stuff out of your head is pen and paper.”

    Users are (often) not the centre of things

    Amazon Kindle is an e-reader device that enables users to read e-books, newspapers, magazines and other digital media. Tech developers saw the need to mimic a book in tablet format, but still provide the feeling of reading a book (turning a page, etc).

    Why was Kindle successful? Because developers placed the users at the heart of the technology experience. We often forget that systems and apps meant for everyone must be designed for everyone.

    E-signatures and encryption are only useful if the people you want to communicate with have the same tools.

    The Moleskin Paper Tablet and Pen+ combo, which digitises your handwritten notes and doodles for editing and sharing, is reliant on its smartpen and mobile app to make it work usefully.

    Microsoft’s Courier Tablet, a book-sized digital journal with a native stylus, held promise as a tool designed for the creative minds, in which architects can sketch building plans or writers can draft documents, but it didn’t catch on – content creation alone wasn’t enough.

    Many systems and apps fail to benefit those who use them. And for that reason, creative professionals who write, sketch, or prototype by hand still carry cheap notebooks and pens.

    Until technology can perform like (or better than) paper, we’ll incessantly default to the original. Going paperless is likely to remain a stretch for many and the past decades have taught us that no matter how smart, technology is never ‘absolute’.

    People will probably be stuffing wads of cash under their mattress for the next 50 years, possibly more. Vinyl records will continue to be played occasionally, and we’ll still see horses and carts on the roads (the queen drives in one every now and then).

    In reality, we’ll more likely experience a blended future in which new and old systems co-exist. And this will apply to a plethora of new technologies, not just paper, including those such as autonomous vehicles.

    Collectors may always want to own a ‘self-drive’ vehicle and if that is the case, then we’ll need systems and infrastructure that allow both systems to coexist. Going forward, the ‘fast track’ to the future may literally be one in which the Hyperloop jostles for space among ‘vintage’ Volkswagens, BMWs and Volvos. Look left, and a drone will be delivering a pizza. Look right and you’ll notice someone doing the morning ‘paper-run’.

    And whilst we all may fantasise about efficient sci-fi future worlds filled with Minority Report holographics, it is likely to be the transition from our current realities to these future enabled utopias where the real engineering challenge will lie.

    Such are the “Back to the Nature” characteristics of ‘progress’.

    This glimpse of the future was crafted by: Sam Dungey. Used with permission.

    (Aurecon has launched a new futuristic blog! Called Just Imagine, it provides a glimpse into the future for curious readers, exploring ideas that are probable, possible and for the imagination. This post originally appeared on Aurecon’s Just Imagine blog. Get access to the latest blog posts as soon as they are published by subscribing to the blog.)

  • Time to Trade Your Tools of the Trade?

    New Colors and Old Guides Mean You Could Be Missing Out!

    If you haven’t upgraded your Pantone Guides and books for several years, your colors are no longer meeting full market demand nor are they reliably accurate.

    Here’s why:

    Pantone guides are arranged chromatically vs. numerically in order to inspire designers and make color ranges easy to locate
    Pantone guides are arranged chromatically vs. numerically in order to inspire designers and make color ranges easy to locate.

    AGING EFFECTS: IS MY COLOR THE RIGHT COLOR?

    Pantone guides and books are produced using the highest manufacturing standards. In each edition, we ensure:

    • Highly-regulated ink formula consistency
    • Printed on the most popular commercial-grade 100 lb and 80 lb text weight stocks
    • Carefully monitored for imperfections during the production process

    However, our guides will not last forever. Due to handling, fading, and aging, your colors will appear inaccurate over time. That’s why we recommend replacing your guides every 12-18 months, depending on your usage case and storage habits.

    • Handling = Smearing and removing pigment from natural oils on fingertips
    • Pages rubbing together = Scratching or removing pigment
    • Light exposure = Fading
    • Paper aging = Yellowing effects
    • Ambient moisture = Accelerating paper aging
    Pantone recommends replacing guides and books every 12-18 months, as normal usage and exposure will render your colors inaccurate.
    Pantone recommends replacing guides and books every 12-18 months, as normal usage and exposure will render your colors inaccurate.

    PRODUCTION GUIDES: IS MY VENDOR LOOKING AT THE SAME COLOR?

    One of the biggest design frustrations is the circle of rework that goes into getting the right color. We’ve all been there. Why is it so challenging? There are many reasons, but an easy one is that your production partners are using old guides.

    If your guide is new but your printer’s guide is even just a few years older, then your colors will no longer accurately match, which can cause:

    • Miscommunication (ex: “Why can’t they match my color?”)
    • Frustration (ex: “The Brand rejected the sample again.”)
    • Unnecessary reworks (ex: “We can’t accept this sample, please resend…again”)
    • Cost in shipping approval samples (ex: “Please ship Priority Overnight, the final sample was due three weeks ago.”)
    • Loss of time (ex: “We’re going to miss the launch date if the sample can’t be approved.”)
    • Dissatisfaction (ex: “Ask the Brand if they can accept a Running Change.”)

    And ultimately, Reluctant Acceptance (ex: “This is the best match possible”)

    So, if you use Pantone Products to specify or approve colors with your design or production partners, then you might want to encourage them to keep their guides up to date as well (e.g. buy them at the same time).

    ASK AND YOU SHALL RECEIVE… NEW COLORS!

    In 2010, Pantone launched the PANTONE PLUS Series publications – a more modern version of the PANTONE MATCHING SYSTEM®. Since then, we have added new colors about every two years.

    More colors are the single most noted request of Pantone from our design community. We’ve heard you, and why shouldn’t designers want more?

    More colors mean:

    • More expression
    • More choices
    • More diversity
    • More precise representation
    • More unique palettes
    • More joy!

    Market driven, on-trend, sellable

    Now with a total of 1,867 solid PANTONE Colors, imagine the creative and communication possibilities!
    Now with a total of 1,867 solid PANTONE Colors, imagine the creative and communication possibilities!

    NEW COLORS, NEW POSSIBILITIES!

    Illustrating the present and reading the future, Pantone proudly introduced another 112 new colors in March 2016 to give designers a greater range of expression and freedom. Having the right colors to choose from is essential when making design decisions.

    • Color commands our attention.
    • Color is the single most important design element in reflecting mood and style.
    • In today’s visual world, creating the right color palette is more crucial to success than ever before.
    • Consumer reaction to color, especially in packaging and consumables, is based on proven psychology.
    • Sending a strategic message with a precise color strategy is critical.

    Here’s what can be found inside our updated series of global color communication tools:

    • A total of 1,867 Solid PANTONE Colors.
    • Colors relevant and expected for contemporary packaging, created in collaboration with major brands.
    • Emphasis on specific color ranges derived from market requests, our community has asked us for colors and we’re responding to meet those popular requests.
    • 112 new ways to be even more creative, inspired and expressive through color.

    Are You Short On Color?

    Since we launched the PANTONE PLUS SERIES back in 2010, there have been three color collection additions.
    Since we launched the PANTONE PLUS SERIES back in 2010, there have been three color collection additions.

    Since we launched the PANTONE PLUS SERIES back in 2010, there have been three color collection additions. Check out the chart below – you would be missing over 750 colors!

     

    New Color Launch Dates # of Colors Added Total Colors Colors missing from your last guide update
    2010 224 1,341 If you haven’t updated in the last 6+ years – you’re missing 756 colors
    2012 336 1,677 If you haven’t updated in the last 5 years – you’re missing 532 colors
    2014 84 1,755 If you haven’t updated in the last 3 years – you’re missing 196 colors
    2016 112 1,867 If you haven’t updated in the last 2 years – you’re missing 112 colors

    IN SUMMARY…

    Remember:

    Color guides age, which means you aren’t really seeing the color your designing & referencing Pantone recommends replacing your guide every 12-18 months.

    Talk to your production partners:

    Even with updated guides on your end, who knows how long your production partners have been referencing the same guide.

    Ask your partners to replace their guides every year or send them the color with our solid chip book.

    New colors, new possibilities!

    Pantone has launched 756 new, market-driven colors since 2010. Check them out!

  • Ron Patterson contests PIAA elections

    (l-r) Peter Orel, CEO, Finsbury Green; Ron Patterson, former state secretary, PIAA Victoria

    Former PIAA Victoria state secretary Ron Patterson has put his name forward for the PIAA elections and will run against Finsbury Green CEO Peter Orel for the Victoria seat on the board. In Tasmania, former AIW Printing director Peter Clark will contest the ballot against Martin Guilliamse, GM of Mark Media in Hobart.

    All seven sitting directors who sought reappointment have been returned unopposed. They are:

    Kieran May – ACT
    Matt Aitken – NSW
    Walter Kuhn – Queensland
    Peter Lane – South Australia
    Graham Jamieson – Western Australia
    Chris Segaert – National
    John Scott – National

    “The entire pre-existing board is being returned uncontested, which is a healthy result and a great endorsement of what they have done,” says PIAA CEO Andrew Macaulay. “There will be a ballot in Victoria and Tasmania where existing board members retired. [Current Victorian-based member Kellie Northwood is stepping down and Tasmanian board member Craig Pearce resigned last month.]

    “The four candidates are all excellent members of the association and it’s always good to see competition for new places on the board. The AEC will now send out the ballot papers to the eligible voters – that is current financial members – in those two states.”

    Patterson is a high-profile industry identity and has been a prominent critic of the way the board has been run in recent years following his acrimonious departure from the PIAA in 2012, when his position was declared redundant after a consolidation of operations.

    He was formerly sales and marketing manager for M&M Binders in Melbourne, where he teamed up with the Todisco family, before leaving early in 2014. Patterson says one of the most important issues facing the board today is the lack of industry training.

    “A lot of people are just not being trained and it is bloody criminal. You only have to look at the recent apprenticeship numbers. It’s an issue that has to be discussed with the membership. A lot of us have complained but no one wants to put their hand up. I’ve been involved with the PIAA for 16 years in one way or another and now that I’m semi-retired, the timing is right. I’m keen to get my feet under the desk and go to work. The board needs some new blood with printing industry experience.”

    Martin Guilliamse, GM, Mark Media

    Tasmanian candidate Martin Guilliamse of Mark Media says if he’s elected he’d like to see the board focus on boosting membership numbers.

    “I’ve been a member of the PIAA for a long time and we’ve lost a lot of members over the past few years. The board and the new CEO seem to be back on track now but for a while people became disappointed and saw the PIAA as becoming more of a corporate structure than a members’ association. I know members in Tasmania and elsewhere who left because they didn’t see how they were getting value for money. We need to speak to them and find out what we can do to get them back on board.”

    Guilliamse has been on the Tasmanian regional committee for about 20 years and also served on the PICA/Diemen Award committee.

    He’s standing against former AIW Printing director Peter Clark (pictured, right), who retired from the web offset company in 2012 but has continued in the industry as a consultant to AIW and other companies in the region.

    Peter Clark, founder and former director, AIW Printing

    PIAA President, Kieran May, says he’s pleased that the current Board members who sought reappointment have been returned.

    “We are focused on reinvigorating the association and the industry and the job must continue. As an industry, we cannot forget where we have been, but our eyes must remain firmly on the future.  Members in both Tasmania and Victoria now have an opportunity to decide who joins us on the journey.

    “I am sure the members will carefully consider the relative strengths of each nominee and make their choice wisely. The candidates in both States will add to that diversity, albeit in different ways and from very different backgrounds.”

    The ballot will officially open tomorrow, 29 September 2016, and close at 10:00 am (AEDT) on Thursday, 27 October 2016.

     

     

  • HP under fire for ink ‘bait and switch’

    Tech giant HP is facing a consumer backlash over its sudden move to block the use of cheaper third-party ink cartridges in its printers. There are reports that counterfeit ink cartridges are already available to trick the updated HP printers. 

    Consumer advocacy group Choice is investigating whether the company has breached Australian Consumer Laws and the US-based Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has launched a petition calling on HP to restore the original functionalityand make amends for its self-destructing printers.

    A couple of weeks ago, owners of HP printers who were using cheaper non-HP ink began receiving error messages such as: “cartridge problem” or “one or more cartridges are missing or damaged.” After a flood of complaints, HP confirmed in a press release that that it had added a firmware update to protect its “innovations and intellectual property”:

    HP implemented updates to the firmware related to the security chip in HP OfficeJet, OfficeJet Pro and OfficeJet Pro X printers that maintains secure communications between the cartridge and the printer. These printers will continue to work with refilled or re-manufactured cartridges with an Original HP security chip. Other cartridges may not function.

    Choice has begun an investigation to determine whether HP has breached consumer law by preventing consumers from using third-party ink cartridges.

    “We’re concerned that HP is throwing its weight around in order to lock consumers into buying its expensive ink, taking away consumer choice and treating its customers terribly,” says Choice head of media Tom Godfrey. “After years of being able to use non-HP ink, consumers have a reasonable expectation that they will be able to continue to choose which ink they will use. If consumers bought an HP printer relying on the fact that it could use non-HP ink, and HP has unilaterally taken that functionality away, then there is a risk that the company is breaching consumer law.”

    Choice compared the numbers on ink costs and found HP’s yellow ink will set you back $5128 per litre – which is more expensive than luxury items like Chanel No 5 ($3514 a litre).

    “When you consider that HP printer ink can cost around 50% more than some expensive perfumes, this is a black day for ink consumers,” Godfrey says.

    The EFF – a US nonprofit devoted to defending technological freedom, human rights and privacy in courtrooms, legislatures, and online – accused HP of running a ‘bait and switch’ and launched a petition calling on the company to restore the original functionality of their printers with a firmware update that rolls back the self-destruct sequence.

    “HP recently activated a secret feature in its Officejet Pro printers (and possibly other models) that causes the printers to refuse to print with third-party or recycled ink cartridges,” said the EFF. “HP is just the latest of many companies to use DRM [Digital Rights Management] technologies to place artificial limits on what you can do with your property. DRM is bad for innovation, it’s bad for users’ rights, and it’s a security disaster. Please join us in demanding that HP make amends for its self-destructing printers.”

    The EFF petition, which has about 9,000 signatures at last count, can be signed here.

    “HP customers should be able to use the ink of their choosing in their printers for the same reason that Cuisinart customers should be able to choose whose bread goes in their toasters,” says Cory Doctorow, EFF.

    Auckland cartridge supplier Toner Direct – which sells both manufacturers’ original and third-party consumables online – says it has received many complaints from people ‘jumping up and down’ about the change. MD Trevor Johnston told stuff.co.nz there was an argument that HP was ‘protecting its brand’ and said that there was nothing particularly new in HP’s tactic, which other printer manufacturers had also tried.

    But he warned that some third-party cartridge makers have already come out with new cartridges which trick the updated printers into thinking they were genuine HP parts. He said the game of cat and mouse between HP and those suppliers could have an impact on customers’ purchasing decisions.

    Toner Direct’s opinion was that consumers should have choice, he said.

     

     

  • Issue 846 – September 28

    Good to see some robust competition for places on the national board of the Printing Industries. It shows a commitment and enthusiasm for the Association to continue its work of representing and improving the printing industry. There are some high profile candidates and some well-known faces. Good also to see the sitting board members elected unopposed. It augers well for the future stability and harmony of the board.

    Now it’s up to the members to vote, so let’s see a good turnout to support the candidates, no matter who wins.

    Welcome to your latest issue of Print21, the premier news and information service for the printing industry across Australia and New Zealand.

    Patrick Howard
    Publishing Editor

  • New $10,000 print award competition

    Konica Minolta institutes a National Specialised Print Awards for its customers to recognise excellence in digital printing.

    The $10,000 prize is for promotions and business development for printers operating Konica Minolta technology. It is designed to recognise the level of printing excellence being produced on digital presses.

    “We wanted to find some way of awarding the many really excellent prints our representatives see every day. Often they are produced on a Bizhub 1070, which costs around $50,000 that are delivering amazing results,” said David Casarino, National Manager Industrial Print.

    “We thought a promotion package provides the best reward and so often a cash prize can get lost pretty quick in a business.”

    A brainchild of Anthony Lewis, general manager, production printing, the competition is open to all Australian-based companies, individuals or associations involved in any area of print production that produces the entered print on a Konica Minolta engine. It looks to engage advertising agencies, art and design studios, advertisers and clients, printers, prepress companies and print finishing and paper merchants.

    Entries for the national competition close on December 16 with state finalists flown to Sydney in February for the award ceremony. An industry panel of experts will judge the entries, looking for printing and finishing excellence.

    Entry forms are available here.

    The judges provide the following tips and guidelines for entrants. Good luck!

    1. Don’t leave it until the last moment to select your entries for submission. When a suitable job comes in, carefully check during the run and keep some perfect copies for potential entry in the Specialised Print Awards.

    2. Supply duplicate copies whenever possible; (to allow for damage in transit etc.) The judges will always check the second copy if a problem appears to be not the printer/print finisher’s error.

    3. Consider entering the same entry in more than one category to increase your chances of winning.

    4. Ensure good presentation – creased or folded prints do not maximise the appearance of the entry.

    5. Fill out all the criteria required on the entry form carefully and accurately, describing the processes that went into the job, (including the Konica Minolta Print System model used) difficulties in production, details of embellishment or specific effects required by the customer.

    6. Examine the entire job with a magnifying glass, the Judges will check and re-check before submission. At least two judges will look at every page.

    7. The Judges will be looking for:

    • Perfect registration – mis-registration is the most common fault in all  categories

    • Total absence of all forms of spots and errors

    • Reverse type that fills in

    • Precise page line-ups and even colour continuity across the print

    • No mottle, setoff, scuff, scratches or other marking

    • No banding, gloss differentiation, guide marking and bleeding

    In addition to print appearance, judges may also consider:

    • Quality of image preparation and overall design for digital print.

    • Accuracy of finishing – folding, binding, trimming and assembly.

    • Cleanness and precision of die-cutting and other embellishments

     

    The Judges will also assess the degree of difficulty and the skill required in producing the print job.

     

     

     

     

    KONICA MINOLTA BUSINESS SOLUTIONS AUSTRALIA PTY LIMITED ACN 001 065 096

     

    Konica Minolta National Specialised Print Awards 2016

    CONDITIONS OF ENTRY

    1. All entries must have been printed between 1 January 2016 and the 15th of December 2016.

    2. Entries need to be delivered to your state Branch, and submitted with your Konica Minolta Account Representative.

    3. Entries close at 5pm on Friday the 16th of December 2016.

    4. This competition is open to all Australian based companies, individuals or associations involved in any area of print production and that owns a Konica Minolta digital print system and this KM digital print system was used to produce the print work for submission. These companies include, but are not limited to advertising agencies, art and design studios, advertisers and clients, printing companies, pre-press companies, print finishing, paper merchants, or any other person or company associated with the production of digital print using a Konica Minolta digital print System.

    5. There is no restriction on the type of stock used. Imported stock, artwork or photographs from overseas sources are acceptable, however PRINTING AND FINISHING MUST BE PRODUCED IN AUSTRALIA. In the case of graphic design categories, all graphic design must have been completed in its entirety in Australia.

    6. An official online entry form must be completed for each entry with involvement from your sales account representative. Please supply typed or clearly written details. Forms must be fully completed and make recognition of all contributing sources, with accurate spelling as the details submitted on the entry will be used as copy for the award book and certificates. The committee accepts no responsibility for any inaccuracies in the details submitted.

    7. A minimum of two (2) samples of each entry are required!

    These samples should be entered together with the entry form attached to one sample via paper clip or similar. Digital components of entries should be submitted via the web page link. Please write any web page links clearly on the entry form.

    8. All entries will be retained by Konica Minolta Business Solutions Australia (KMBSA). However, if you do require your entry to be returned, this must be noted on the entry form, and pick-up arranged. After the date of the 3rd February 2017, all entries that have not been picked up, will become the property of Konica Minolta Business Solutions Australia (KMBSA).

    9. Entries of value should be insured by the entrant.

    Although every care is taken, KMBSA accepts no responsibility for any entry that is lost or damaged whilst in their possession or in transit. KONICA MINOLTA BUSINESS SOLUTIONS AUSTRALIA PTY LIMITED ACN 001 065 096

     

    10. Entries will be restricted to three entries per category, per company.

    Companies may enter as many categories as they choose. In the event a company enters more than this number in a single category, the panel of judges will determine which three should go onto the main judging in that category, or will reassign entries to a different category if applicable.

    11. The Judging Committee’s decision will be final.

    12. Where a duplicate entry of the same item is entered into the same category by different entrants, priority will be given to the printer’s entry (in printing categories) or graphic designer (in graphic design categories).

    13. Your entry form must specify a category in which to enter the piece. An entry may be re-categorised at the Chief Judge’s discretion.

    14. In the event of low entry numbers in a particular category, the entries from that category may be combined into another suitable category.

    15. Entries, regardless of category or format, that promote any organisation within the scope of the printing industry, or which feature the printing company or entrant’s name as a prominent feature of the entry, will be classified as “self-promotion”.

    16. There will be one winner per state or territory who will be invited to attend the Konica Minolta National Specialised Print Awards event in Sydney. State Finalist package will include return economy airfares to Sydney from their home state or territory, one night accommodation and transfers to be arranged by Konica Minolta. The overall winner will be announced at this event and will receive a $10,000AUD advertising package which includes creative and media using Konica Minolta Australia nominated agencies. Valid for 6 months.

    17. The prize is non-exchangeable, non-transferable, and is not redeemable for cash or other prizes.

    FILLING OUT THE ENTRY FORM

    An official online entry form must be completed for each entry.

    Section A of the entry form is used to catalogue all entries and is not shown to the judges. Attach Section A to your entry with a paper clip or similar. Section B is for technical details to be considered by the judges. Ensure you do not have your business name or any identifying information written on this section.

    Securely affix Section B to the back of your entry.

    JUDGE’S TIPS KONICA MINOLTA BUSINESS SOLUTIONS AUSTRALIA PTY LIMITED ACN 001 065 096

     

    1. Don’t leave it until the last moment to select your entries for submission. When a suitable job comes in, carefully check during the run and keep some perfect copies for potential entry in the Specialised Print Awards.

    2. Supply duplicate copies whenever possible; (to allow for damage in transit etc.) The judges will always check the second copy if a problem appears to be not the printer/print finisher’s error.

    3. Consider entering the same entry in more than one category to increase your chances of winning.

    4. Ensure good presentation – creased or folded prints do not maximise the appearance of the entry.

    5. Fill out all the criteria required on the entry form carefully and accurately, describing the processes that went into the job, (including the Konica Minolta Print System model used) difficulties in production, details of embellishment or specific effects required by the customer.

    6. Examine the entire job with a magnifying glass, the Judges will check and re-check before submission. At least two judges will look at every page.

    7. The Judges will be looking for:

    • Perfect registration – misregistration is the most common fault in ALL categories

    • Total absence of all forms of spots and errors

    • Reverse type that fills in

    • Precise page line-ups and even colour continuity across the print

    • No mottle, setoff, scuff, scratches or other marking

    • No banding, gloss differentiation, guide marking and bleeding

    In addition to print appearance, judges may also consider:

    • Quality of image preparation and overall design for digital print.

    • Accuracy of finishing – folding, binding, trimming and assembly.

    • Cleanness and precision of die-cutting and other embellishments

    The Judges will also assess the degree of difficulty and the skill required in producing the print job.

  • Reflex upgrades to Horizon finishing

    Adelaide’s Reflex Printing upgraded to a new Horizon Collating and Finishing line just in time to begin its new multi-million-dollar printing contract with the SA government.

    “Our existing printer was 20 years old and was having too many technical issues so we had to bite the bullet and do our research,” says director Mark Frankcom. “All the printers I spoke to with Horizons told me they were more than happy. One of them said it would be like upgrading my car to a Rolls Royce and now that it’s here and it’s up and running, I have to concur.”

    Reflex’s new collating and finishing line, installed about a month ago by Currie Group, includes:

    Horizon VAC-1000A Main Ten Bin Tower.

    Horizon VAC-1000C Rear Delivery Ten Bin Tower

    Horizon SPF-200L Landscape Stitcher/Folder

    Horizon FC-200L Front Edge Trimmer unit

    Horizon PJ-77R Rear deliver/Jogger.

    Reflex's Horizon FC-200L Front Edge Trimmer unit

    “It’s been here for about four weeks now and has been excellent in terms of speed and quality,” says Frankcom. “It allows us to do a lot of tricky jobs trouble free and it underlines the importance of upgrading your equipment if you want to keep up with the market.

    'They actually bloody well care': Mark Frankcom, Reflex Digital

    “We’ve done a lot of jobs on them and it just gives us a lot more options, with extra modules that can be added to give us more scope. The Horizon is able to handle a landscape A4, it has a 30 per cent bigger pump for vacuum and separation and we have the latest towers, called one thousands. We’ve done 64 page books plus the cover, using 17 of the bays. We also put in an automatic coiler – a machine that forms coil. We do a lot of digital and much of it is now finished on the machine.”

    Frankcom says the installation service by Currie Group was ‘fantastic.’

    “You know what? They actually bloody well care. They sent out two of their techs who were on site here for the whole week – one of them was an Adelaide-based guy and the other was flown in from Melbourne. They had very good knowledge and were excellent trainers. They trained six of our staff, two at a time, and were very thorough.”

    Reflex Printing, which employs 20 staff at its plant in O’Connor Court, Gepps Cross, is now in good shape to begin a new multi-million-dollar printing contract with an unnamed SA government agency that begins on October 1, 2016.

    The factory floor at Reflex

    Currie Group MD Bernie Robinson says the Horizon collating and finishing line will give Reflex a number of advantages over its previous equipment.

    “Their older machine was breaking down too much and the new Horizon line gives them more options and increased speed – including the landscape sheet which can be folded in half, a 30 per cent bigger pump, a converter that allows them to stack more books, they can also produce two jobs at once and go backwards into a jogger.”

    Robinson says it’s the third or fourth finishing line that Currie has installed in South Australia recently. “We’ve had a fair bit of business in Adelaide for quite a while now, including the big PMP installation, and things are going pretty good.

    “Mark negotiated a very good deal that includes a 12-month warranty on parts and labour and he’s happy with the way the Horizon is performing,” says Robinson.

    Reflex & Adelaide Digital Printing, a South Australian-owned company established in 1988, specialises in commercial and digital printing, print management, graphic design and web development, pre-press and print finishing.

     

     

  • Print drives Bauer to 2.3bn in sales

    Global publishing giant Bauer posted the second-highest turnover in its company history and praised its print business as ‘the platform for our success.’

    Bauer Media Group recorded sales of EUR 2.316 billion in fiscal year 2015, with the group’s magazine business making the greatest contribution.

    Europe’s largest magazine publisher generated total global sales of EUR 1.689 billion in its Print business during 2015. Magazine sales accounted for EUR 1.292 billion of the total. The company’s radio business achieved the strongest growth – after acquisitions in Scandinavia and the UK – with sales up 38% to EUR 320 million.

    “Our growth is based on innovative products and the constant nurturing of our brands,” says publisher Yvonne Bauer. “Print is the platform for our success. In addition, we will continue to expand the pillars Radio and Digital and make further strategic investments in all our business fields.”

    Sales outside Germany accounted for 65.6 percent of total turnover – a slight increase on the previous year . Bauer Media Group is active in 20 countries and sells 1.3 billion magazines around the world.

    In Australia, Bauer publishes 60 magazines including The Australian Women’s Weekly, Woman’s Day and TV Week. The company has shut down several underperforming titles including Women’s Fitness, Madison and ZooWeekly.

  • Free colour checks from The Colour Doctor

    David Crowther, Colour Graphic Services

    The Colour Doctor –  David Crowther of Colour Graphic Services – has brought back the free Colour Health Check service – valued at $495 – for all printers, until October 31st.

    First offered at Printex 2015, it proved very popular, especially with wide format, digital and offset printers experiencing colour variations.

    “We did many of these during and after Printex and I was looking for something to offer the market so thought, ‘Why not bring them back for free?’ It’s easy for an offset, digital, flexo label or wide format printer to initiate. We send a special test forme, or control strip, which is printed on the selected device and sent back to us.

    “Using ISO 12647 as the benchmark, we thoroughly analyse the printed result using Mellow Colour Printspec and Techkon instruments and produce a detailed report on the results and where colour issues might be found in the production workflow.

    “The PDF test forme file, for digital and wide format, we send in advance is big, up to 180 Mb,” says Crowther, “so either high bandwidth or a file sending service such as DropBox or SendStuffNow can be used. It’s a PDF so can easily be put into the workflow and printed out. We can provide a test forme or control strip for offset, digital, narrow web and wide format so it is important to know what device prints it out.”

    For Colour Graphic Services to visit a printer, produce the test forme, measure, report usually costs $495 in the Sydney metro area, so the free service is a good saving and provides printers with useful knowledge about their printing output devices.

    To secure your free colour health check, see:

    http://www.colourgraphicservices.com/specials.html

    or email: info@colourgraphicservices.com

    The special Colour Graphics Services Testforme

     

     

     

  • Scepticism over eco labels

    The more we learn about environmental accountability, the more we realise that this is a massively complex topic. Everywhere we see clever ideas for improving the sustainability of the graphics industry, yet equally we see evidence of how far we have yet to go. How we progress as an industry, depends on how well we encourage companies to appreciate their environmental aspects, those things in the business likely to have an environmental impact. Only then can business owners and their customers start considering ways to make improvements. And this brings us to an interesting point: how does one quantify environmental aspects and impacts?

    Laurel Brunner

    The obvious answer is to do a Life Cycle Analysis, but what should the basis of such an analysis be? Is it the business, its products, its manufacturing processes? Where do you start? These questions take us into the realm of eco labels, which are awarded to confirm that a company meets strict environmental criteria. In order to be certified to a label such as the Nordic Swan or the Blue Angel, a full audit of every aspect of the business is required. To achieve certification, the company has to be able to prove that it meets strict and prescribed environmental requirements, requirements specified by the eco label authority and owner. In the case of print for example, the Nordic Swan label can only be applied to printed matter that Nordic Swan says has “environmentally-friendly properties”. So far so vague.

    The other difficulty for graphics professionals is that going for an eco label is extremely expensive. There is a massive industry underlying the quantification of environmental impacts and the certification of compliance to a particular label. This is part of the reason for scepticism on the part of printing company owners, that combined with a lack of alternatives. Printing and publishing professionals do not have tools to help them achieve eco label criteria. There are no documents explaining what they need to know about their business in order to qualify for an eco label. We see the need for some sort of environmental declaration specific to graphics technologies and graphics production.

    Such a framework document would define the data requirements for assessing the environment impact of the organisation and of its products. The document would also outline the aspects of prepress, printing, post-press and process control that need to be considered, plus their environmental impacts. The document would also outline requirements for data accuracy, allocation, certainty, transparency, and so on. This tool would not specify how data should be collected, but rather what data should be gathered. Once collected, organised and fully reported, the data for an environmental declaration could be used as part of an eco labeling evaluation. This ought to encourage the graphics to further improve its environmental impact, and at a lower cost.

    – Laurel Brunner

    The Verdigris project is an industry initiative intended to raise awareness of print’s positive environmental impact. It provides a weekly commentary to help printing companies keep up to date with environmental standards, and how environmentally friendly business management can help improve their bottom lines. 

    Verdigris is supported by the following companies: Agfa GraphicsEFIEpson, FespaHPKodakKornit, RicohSpindrift, Splash PRUnity Publishing and Xeikon.

     

     

  • Issue 845 – September 23

    The development of printing technology shows no sign of slowing down. Just when we’re coming to terms with new ways of printing, such as nanotechnology with its very thin ink coverage, along comes something else to compete. The arrival of Canon’s UVgel has an air of expectation about it. Inkjet and gel just naturally go together, the clever part is in the material technology that makes the coverage so thin it can slash the cost of wide format printing by up to 40%. It’s early days of course, but the bar has just been raised, or rather lowered. It sets the scene for other manufacturers to match the Canon performance.

    Welcome to your latest issue of Print21, the primary news and information service for the printing industry across Australia and New Zealand.

    Patrick Howard
    Publishing Editor.

  • Locals make up 1% of drupa attendance

    More than 2000 industry types from Australia and New Zealand made the trip to Düsseldorf in May for the world’s largest printing trade show. This is in line with attendance at previous shows.

    In a Post Show Report, Sabine Geldermann, director drupa, confirmed that of the more than 260,000 industry visitors to the Dusseldorf Messe, Australian and Oceania made up one percent.  It appears the urge to travel and inspect new printing technologies is still strong in Australian and New Zealand printers, despite a drop of almost 20% in the total visitors to the show.

    In a typically upbeat review of the show, the organisers said there were 1,828 exhibitors from 54 countries with the printing and packaging sectors understandably leading the way. Visitors came from 183 countries with 75% coming from outside Germany. Organisers maintain the investment climate was much better than in the previous shows with a reported 65% of visitors indicating they had concrete intentions of buying new equipment.

    Despite the show being billed as the inkjet and digital drupa, the main market focus was still fairly traditional. When calculating visitor responses the organisers found sheetfed offset printing was top of mind with 54 percent of visitors nominating it as their primary area of interest above the 53 percent that said digital print including inkjet. Web-fed offset followed with 17%, ahead of flexography at 16%.

    Despite the intense publicity around Benny Landa’s Nanography, only three percent of visitors nominated it as their major interest. Even as the drupa organisers promoted the show’s new positioning with a focus on topics it considers to have growth potential, such as 3-D and functional printing, it seems the printing industry is focused on proven offset and digital technologies.

    The next drupa is already on the drawing boards, locked in for June 23-July 3 2020.