Archive for January, 2019

  • Japanese swoop on Spicers in $146.7m deal

    Being bought: KPP seeks $146.7m deal for Spicers

    Paper, packaging and wide format supplier Spicers is being bought by Japanese paper giant KPP, in a $146.7m deal set to go through in July, subject to shareholder approval.

    Spicers – which had sales of $384m in the last financial year and an Australian EBIT of $4.2m – has signed a binding Scheme Implementation Deed with Kokusai Pulp & Paper (KPP), under which KPP would acquire all the shares in Spicers through a Scheme of Arrangement.

    Spicers shareholders will receive 7c per share, a 27 per cent premium over shares which were trading at 5.3c as the proposed deal was announced

    Under the terms of the Scheme the 7 cents offer comprises 4.3c from KPP ($90m) for the enterprise value of the business, and 2.7c from realisable Spicers asset sales and surplus net cash of Spicers ($56.7m), if the deal goes through. 

    Spicers directors, who own 26.6 per cent of the company, have unanimously voted in favour of the deal. To get over the line the vote must be more than 75 per cent of the shareholders who vote, with more than 50 per cent of eligible shareholders participating.

    Speaking to Print21 this morning Spicers CEO David Martin said the main motivation for Spicers was to get investment into the company, and for current shareholders to realise a return. He said, “For print, packaging and wide format businesses in Australia and New Zealand the deal means increased guarantee of supply, which is great news, and the likelihood of increased stock range.

    “KPP wants to grow its business. Spicers is its first acquisition since its IPO last year, and will be the first of many. Having the backing of such a large well resourced business can only be good news for Spicers and for the Australia and New Zealand print markets.”

    KPP is a trading company, its sits between mills and merchants and uses its immense buying power to secure both supply and pricing. It supplies more than 100 merchants in Japan. It is not in the wide format business, but, says Martin, is keen to learn from the Spicers experience and develop the model.

    Martin says the merchant has been working with KPP for ‘many years’  commenting, ”I see many advantages for the Spicers business in taking this step to become part of a successful, global, business with a willingness to invest for growth in our key revenue streams of Print & Packaging, Sign & Display and Architecture & Interior Design.

    “KPP has been a key business partner of Spicers, and I believe having access to its global resources will provide opportunities for Spicers in many new markets and product categories.

    ”Our business is in an excellent position, and our strategic focus over the past two years has delivered improved value for our current shareholders.

    Many advantages: David Martin, CEO, Spicers.

    Spicers is one of the big two paper merchants in Australia and New Zealand, with arch rival Ball & Doggett also now having Japanese owners, in its case Japan Pulp & Paper, which also bought the Asian arm of Spicers, for SGD $15m three months ago. With Australian Paper also owned by a Japanese company, Nippon Paper, the Spicers deal means the vast majority of Australian commercial paper and packaging media supply will now be from Japanese owned businesses.

    In the last financial year Spicers achieved sales revenue of $384m with Print & Packaging up by half a per cent to $304.7m, while Sign & Display rose by 2.6 per cent to $79.3m. Australian sales were up to $204.4m from $201.8m, although this is still behind the 2016 sales of $211m.

    The Australian EBIT was up by 80 per cent at $4.2m, which the company says was due to improved trading in key product categories.

    KPP has revenues of JPY377.7bn ($4.8bn) generated by 950 staff operating across 26 sites. It is Japan’s biggest selling paper comany, and an envioronmental pioneer It listed on the Nikkei in June. Its growth strategy, set last year, is business expansion through M&A in the Asia Pacific.

    Spicers is now three years on from its exit from its disastrous European adventure, which saw it rack up losses of $300m under its old PaperlinX brand. The company closed or sold all its business there, as well as those in Canada, and has focused on Australia, New Zealand and Asia prior to its sale to JPP.

    Spicers shares (as Paperlinx) were trading at more than $4 for the first five years after 2000, then at $3 for the three years prior to the GFC, they plummeted to around 50c a decade ago, and then collapsed to the 7c-5c range five years ago, where they have flatlined ever since.

    The last year’s figures though showed the company had arrested falling sales, increased profits, albeit to a still modest amount, and with $79m worth of sales in wide format hardware and consumables had become one of the major players in that field.

  • Embellishing: the truth – Print21 Magazine

    Samples of Scodix digital embellishment.

    With the value that embellishments such as foiling and spot varnish can add to printing work, it is not surprising that many businesses are jumping on board to pretty up their print.

    The question soon comes up, however: when should printers invest in their own embellishing kit, as opposed to outsourcing to a for-trade finishing house? Jake Nelson spoke with the experts to find out. Read the full report in Print21 magazine.

  • Mission-critical service – Print21 Magazine

    A palpable sense of mission in the service offering of Konica Minolta: (l-r) Bronwyn Lear, Michael George and Paulo Leong.

    Printing presses only make money for printers when they are running. Uptime is the essential factor when calculating productivity, even more so than speed.

    Delivering fast and reliable service to ensure maximum utilisation is more than a mission statement for Konica Minolta; it’s the way the company distinguishes itself in the fiercely competitive digital printing market.

    According to Michael George, State Service Delivery Manager NSW, Konica Minolta has developed a unique service model in Australia that delivers world best results. Read the full report in Print21 magazine.

  • HP Indigo in CMYKhub – Print21 Magazine

    Biggest installation
 in Australia: CMYKhub CEO Trent Nankervis and communications manager Glen Francis at the Melbourne print hub with the B2
 HP Indigo 10000 and the HP Indigo 5600.

    National trade printing house CMYKhub has installed five 
HP Indigo Digital Presses, the biggest order supplier Currie Group 
has received in the 17 years it has been supplying the presses.

    The five HP Indigo presses at CMYKhub join the four the company already has, and means that each CMYKhub has two 
HP Indigo, with the exception of Sydney, which has a B2 HP Indigo 10000 Digital Press.

    Read the full report in Print21 magazine.

  • Holmesglen reborn – Print21 Magazine

    New Horizon at Holmesglen: students learning to program and cut on Horizon

    Victoria’s leading print training centre Holmesglen is establishing a strong and stable position in the tumultuous world of print education. Programme director Paul Ross talks to editor Wayne Robinson in the latest issue of Print21 magazine.

    The past few years have been tumultuous for print education and training, with some big wins including Future Print, and some big losses, notably in offsite training, which traditionally formed a key part of the print apprenticeship.

    Today there are two key centres for print training: the Ultimo TAFE in Sydney, and Holmesglen Institute in Melbourne. Read the full report in Print21 magazine.

  • Print21 – issue 1073 WEEKEND SPECIAL

     

    Spicers has certainly been though the mill over the past decade, but since coming on board David Martin has steadied the ship, and now a sale to Japanese giant KPP should provide further stability, and more guarantee of supply to local printers.

     

    Welcome to the latest Australian and New Zealand industry newsletter, this issue with some great weekend reading, brought to you by Print21, the people who know print.

     

    Wayne Robinson
    – Editor

     

  • A tale of two online auctions

    Up for auction: Dotprint’s Heidelberg CD 102, plus a heap of finishing gear

    Changing times at two printing outfits, Dotprint in Springvale and Cardboard Containers in Rosebery  sees a heap of printing and convertuing equipment up for auction.

    The plant and equipment for a complete B1 printing operation is being auctioned next week, as the kit as Springvale, Vic, operation Dotprint goes under the hammer.

    At the same time surplus plant from Cardboard Containers in Rosebery NSW is also going up for auction, as the company merges with another Sydney print nd packaging outfit.

    The online auctions will last from January 23 to February 5, and is online at www.printmachineryauctions.com.au. A viewing day has been slated for 30 January at 31 Rosalie Street, Springvale, Vic, and at 45/49 Dunning Street, Rosebery, NSW, on the same day.

    Centrepiece of the Dotprint auction is a Heidelberg CD 102-5 (1998), a five-colour automated 102 Carton Diameter (CD) offset press, with 199 million impressions. Finishing equipment includes two Polar guillotines, three Heidelberg cylinders,, two Muller-Martini saddles stitchers, and three MBO folders.

    The Cardboard Containers auction sees a Bobst SP 900 E available for bids. It was manufactured in 1972, reconditioned and upgraded 2005. Also available is a Keck boxmaker, two Heidelberg cylinders and a 1973 Solna four-colour offset press.

  • Intertype Iridesse gets world 1st Color-Logic

    Demand: Intertype CEO Ian Bosler checks a Color-Logic test sheet produced on his Fuji Xerox Iridesse

    Melbourne marketing services provider Intertype has installed a new Fuji Xerox Iridesse, the first in the world with the Color-Logic special effects software.

    The new Iridesse joins a company that was founded in 2004 and has enjoyed successive organic growth every year since then. It offers a suite of services including print, mobile marketing, video marketing, publishing, marketing and sales automation systems, to clients around Australia, and increasingly overseas. . Ian Bosler, Intertype CEO, said, “We do things differently, we are innovators, print disruptors.”

    The new six-colour Iridesse provides a range of effects in addition to CMYK in one pass. Bosler said: “Australian customers are beginning to measure advertising effectiveness by tracking the return on investment of their marketing campaigns.

    “They particularly like the metallic special effects we are able to produce using the Color-Logic process on our new Fuji Xerox Iridesse. Our use of Color-Logic has yielded many new projects from existing clients, and is garnering new clients as well.

    “With the software we underprint the metallics, and as it works with Adobe InDesign we can Photoshop multiple effects. We want to make our customers’ marketing collaterol pop. The mettalic effect really works, for instance with image sof cars, or make-up.”

    The new Iridesse replaces a Fuji Xerox 1000i, which also had the Color Logic software. Bosler said, “The metallic brilliance on the Iridesse is outstanding, and there is more reflectance. The ability of Iridesse to print digital white is also appealing to us. Functions such as the banner sheet 1.2m long printing are also really working for us. We have also specified it with inline booklet making with square backed saddle stitching.”

    Color-Logic director of sales and marketing Mark Geeves said: “Color-Logic is fast becoming the preferred process of Iridesse press users around the world. Intertype previously used Color-Logic on a Fuji  Xerox Color 1000i, press, so the transition to their new Fuji Xerox Iridesse was effortless. The company is finding many customers for their metallic print offerings.”

    Color-Logic says it provides brand owners, product managers, corporations, and their advertising agencies the ability to differentiate themselves and their clients with a simple print production process that yields dramatic results.

  • Rob Mollee new Kodak ANZ sales director

    Advanced solutions: Rob Mollee sales director Kodak Australasia

    Well known industry identity Rob Mollee is the new Kodak Australasia sales director, responsible for sales and the sales team for the Australia and New Zealand Graphics Market of the Kodak Printing Systems Division.

    He has been with Kodak for the past 28 years,working across all areas of the graphic arts business in that time.

    Mollee says, “Kodak is bringing technologically advanced solutions to the market, in plates, in workflow, in digital printing. I am delighted to be able to bring my experience with Kodak and in the graphics arts market to the role, and look forward to working with print businesses to achieve the best possible outcomes.

    “Kodak has the most advanced processless pate on the market, the Sonora, which eliminates processing from the printroom. We have just converted Fairfax to Sonora, and most other major clients are using it.”

    The Kodak client list includes the biggest names in the industry; as well as Fairfax both PMP and IVE use Kodak plates, the latter working its way through 280,000sqm at its new Franklin Web NSW site alone, in what is virtually a lights out platemaking room.

    In his new role Mollee is responsible for plates, Nexpress digital presses, and Prinergy digital workflow. Inkjet solutions is a separate division within the company.

  • Rotometrics makes Melbourne investment

    Investment: Rotometrics Australia gets upgrade for its Melbourne facility

    Die making trade house Rotometrics is investing in upgrading its Melbourne centre, in a move it says will reduce turnaround time by eight per cent.

    Rotometrics already offers next day delivery to anywhere in Australia and New Zealand, with a typical order taking 17 hours from receipt of order to shipping, the company says the new equipment will knock another hour off that.

    Announcing the investment was Molly Moroni, the company’s new vice president and general manager of its Asia Pacific region, which includes Australia and New Zealand, who is in the country for a familiarisation tour with Rotometrics ANZ general manager Cain Harper.

    Even quicker turnaround: Molly Moroni, VP & GM Asia Pacifc

    Moroni says, “Australia and New Zealand is a key market for Rotometrics, and Melbourne is the only plant in the southern hemisphere which makes its own dies. The new investment will mean even quicker turnaround for our customers, which they require. Rotometrics is acutely aware of our customers needs to have their assets operational at all times, this investment will boost our aim of ensuring they are never waiting for dies.”

    Rotometrics has its own R+D department in the US, and part of the new investment in Melbourne has come form the company developing technologies to work with thinner films being used by converters, as they seek to drive down costs and improve their environmental credentials.

    Moroni was previously director of Sales for the Americas from August 2012, and vice president of Sales of US and Canada for Rotometrics, prior to taking up the new regional role. She says, “Australia is similar to the US, Canada and the UK in its market, whereas much of the rest of Asia is still developing, some only just moving from flatbed to rotary. The dies manufactured in Melbourne will supply the whole region. Our ANZ customers will get 100 per cent of their dies manufactured in Melbourne.”

    One stop shop: Cain Harper, GM, Rotometrics

    Some 55 staff are employed at the Melbourne site, which manufactures a full range of flexible and solid dies, and all other types of dies. Harper says, “We are a one stop shop.” According to Moroni and Roberts the impact of digital printing has been a positive for Rotometrics, as it has led to a strong trend to multiple shorter runs rather than one long run.

    The Melbourne site manufactures both wide web and narrow web dies. Harper says, “Rotometrics is the blue ribbon supplier, with north of 85 per cent of the market. A die is around 3 per cent of the total cost of a job, people ask themselves why they wouldn’t buy for us, rather than taking the risk with an imported die.”

  • Next census to be three quarters online

    Online: Census 2021 set to be three quarters online, despite shambles last time out

    The government expects three quarters of the population to complete the next census online, pushing print further away. This is despite the shambles in 2016 when it went online for the first time only to infamously crash out on the day.

    The company at the centre of the online census fail two years ago, IBM, has declined to tender for the next one, slated for 2021.

    During census day last time only two million of the estimated 10 million online forms were able to be completed, turning what was promoted as triumph of new technology into a national debacle.

    The 2016 census was the first time the census was available online, cutting millions of printed forms out. In 2011 some 14.5 million forms were printed, by IPMG, but in 2016 this number was down by two thirds, to five million, printed by Print Media Group.

    The 2021 census is expected to have a similar number of forms printed to 2016, although demand may be higher as the public becomes increasingly aware of data hacking. The online version asks for names and addresses.

    Eventually some 59 per cent of the population filled in the 2016 version online a figure the Australian Bureau of Statistics expects to rise to 75 per cent in 2021.

  • Roll-to-roll Karibu coming from swissQprint

    Swiss wide format developer swissQprint is set to launch Karibu, its first reel-to-reel wide format print system, with Fespa in May slated for the launch.

    The swissQprint technology is supplied in Australia by Pozitive, its managing director Philip Trumble tells Print21 that all will be revealed at the show. He says, “We don’t have many details but what we do know is that it will have the renowned swissQprint quality and reliability.”

    Karibu: roll-to-roll swissQprint coming to Fespa

    The company claims that Karibu ‘has features and capabilities like no other large format printer and comes packed with all the experience we have gained over decades of developing and manufacturing high-quality flatbed printers’.

    Trumble says, “We will be taking orders at the show, when we will know what the production schedule will be.”

    The swissQprint flatbeds are positioned at the higher end of the market, and have found a niche in Australia with companies such as CMP, EasySigns and Mediapoint installing the technology.

    The Swiss based company was established in 2008 by four designers who were working for Zund when it decided to pull out of printers and focus on developing cutters. The quartet decided to strike out on their own, and formed swissQprint. Trumble has been the local sales and service supplier since 2012.

  • PrintNZ launches key 2019 dates

    The Kiwi print industry has a series of upcoming events to look forward to, as PrintNZ launches a packed programme for the first half of the year.

    An industry with a strong future: Ruth Cobb, PrintNZ

    Ruth Cobb, CEO at PrintNZ says, “The latter half of last year was by a large a positive for our members, with most ticking along nicely. PrintNZ doesn’t stand still though, and we want to provide the best ongoing support to the industry possible. PrintNZ is committed to continuing and expanding the work we do in and on behalf of the industry.”

    Three key events are the print training graduations, on Wednesday March 27 in Christchurch, Thursday April 4 in Auckland and Friday May 3 at the Pride In Print Awards, Wellington.

    Cobb says, “The graduations provide an opportunity for every trainee that has completed a qualification in 2018 to be recognised in front of their colleagues and family. If you have had someone complete a training programme then make sure you give them the chance to come along and celebrate.”

    The graduations  are also the first step in the Apprentice of the Year process with the Top Ten finalists being announced at these events, alongside the Trainer of the Year, Training Company of the Year and Diploma of Print Management finalists. 

    “As well as a night of glitz and glamour that celebrate the excellent work that is produced by the industry the Pride in Print Awards ahey also provide the platform for announcing the overall winners of the Apprentice of the Year, Training Company and Trainer of the Year awards” said Cobb.

    On a different note at the end of 2018 changes to the Employment Relations Act were passed through Parliament.  Some of these took effect immediately and some take effect from May 6 this year 

    Commencing February PrintNZ will be running seminars right around the country to ensure printers have the correct information. Watch out for full details of dates/locations shortly. 

    Changes to be covered include:
    ・ Restrictions on 90-day trial periods
    ・ Restoration of statutory meal breaks
    ・ Reinstatement as a primary remedy
    ・ Union rights and changes to collective bargaining
    ・ Domestic Violence – Victims Protection Act
    ・ Triangular Relationships Bill
    ・ Minimum Wage Act

    And in good news for printers that have staff due to renew their First Aid Certificates in 2019 members of PrintNZ you can get a discount off the courses at St John by entering the discount code in the Promo box on the payment page.  Email pam.seymour@printnz.co.nz to get the discount code. Every business should have a trained first aider on their premises to ensure they are complying with the requirements of the Health and Safety Act.

    Finally PrintEx 2019, Visual Impact Sydney 2019 and Label & Packaging Expo 2019 will be held at the Sydney Showgrounds, Sydney Olympic Park, from Tuesday August 13 – Friday August 16. 

    Cobb says, “Mark those dates in your diaries and start planning your trip. PrintNZ is hoping to run another Kiwi night at PrintEx.”

  • JCDecaux refutes Sydney tender story

    Not in the running: JC Decaux says it has not submitted bid for $300m City of Sydney contract

    International out of home business (OOH) JCDecaux has refuted claims made by the Australian Financial Review that it is the front runner for the lucrative City of Sydney OOH contract.

    In a statement from the company, JCDecaux said it was surprised by the claims, as it had made the decision not to submit a bid proposal under the “current tender terms”.

    The article claimed that JCDecaux had partnered with Telstra in a bid to strengthen its proposal to nab the $300 million contract, which encompasses street furniture, buses and trains.

    While a decision is expected to be made over the coming weeks, news that JCDecaux has opted not to enter a formal proposal is surprising considering the business has held the contract since 1998.

    However, the statement is also unclear as to whether this decision will also include its recently acquired APN Outdoor business, which had also put forward a proposal prior to the merger. It was previously believed that APN would continue forward with its original proposal.

    With JCDecaux out of the running, only Ooh!Media (formerly Adshel) and APN Outdoor remain in the running, with Ooh!Media thought to be working with Optus to provide the free Wi-Fi service that City of Sydney requires.

    In July 2018 The City of Sydney called for a renewed expressions of interest for its $500 million street furniture and outdoor advertising contract.

    At the time, Lord Mayor Clover Moore said it had “refined” contractual requirements following the first EOI as interested providers said they needed more time to respond to the complex nature of the contract.

     

  • A revolution in textile printing

    When the SureColor Fabric series was first launched it represented a revolution in textile printing. The equipment was designed from the ground up to provide a complete single-vendor solution with simpler operation, higher durability, and superior imaging.

    The F2160 is Epson’s latest generation Direct To Garment (DTG) printer. It features enhanced production flexibility, higher productivity, reduced maintenance, and a lower running cost.

    Optimised for customisation and value-adding on cotton based garments such as T-shirts, Polo tops, jeans and sweats, it will image onto a range of polyester sports and leisure wear, and can also be used for promotional and décor items including tote bags, tea towels and cushions. Prints can be made on pre-cut fabric or directly to finished garments with a heat press used to ‘fix’ the dye.

    The printer can be ordered in a 4-colour configuration for high speed volume production as well as a 5-colour configuration for flexible CYMK + white work. Hardware is covered by a comprehensive on-site warranty with service cover extendable up to three years.

    SureColor F2160 at a glance:

    • Direct to garment low-cost customisation of shirts, caps, bags, and more
    • Epson UltraChrome® DG ink delivers crisp and bright images with a low tack finish, high stretchability and good wash/UV durability
    • Improved performance and enhanced image quality with smoother gradation, an expanded gamut and Dmax
    • New platen grip pads enable faster loading and setting
    • Upgraded self-cleaning print head and new auto cap washing system for enhanced reliability, reduced maintenance and wastage
    • Supplied with enhanced Epson Garment Creator application software
    • Diethlene glycol free ensures for a safer work environment with Oeko-Tex certification so garments can be worn by adults, children and infants
    • Available in high speed 4 colour and flexible 5 colour with White configurations
    • Comprehensive warranty with service cover extendable up to 3 YEARS
    • Supports a wide range of garments with natural and man-made

    Epson UltraChrome DG Ink was developed to support fabric with a 50% or greater cotton content. It adheres well and fixes easily for images with a low tack finish that have good UV/wash durability. Both the ink and Pre-Treatment liquid when applied to cotton fabrics conform to the latest Oeko-Tex Eco Passport standard with garments safe for use by adults, children and babies.

    Click for more information.

     

  • Epson SureColor F2160

    When the SureColor Fabric series was first launched it represented a revolution in textile printing. The equipment was designed from the ground up to provide a complete single-vendor solution with simpler operation, higher durability, and superior imaging.

    The F2160 is Epson’s latest generation Direct To Garment (DTG) printer. It features enhanced production flexibility, higher productivity, reduced maintenance, and a lower running cost.

    Optimised for customisation and value-adding on cotton based garments such as T-shirts, Polo tops, jeans and sweats, it will image onto a range of polyester sports and leisure wear, and can also be used for promotional and décor items including tote bags, tea towels and cushions. Prints can be made on pre-cut fabric or directly to finished garments with a heat press used to ‘fix’ the dye.

    The printer can be ordered in a 4-colour configuration for high speed volume production as well as a 5-colour configuration for flexible CYMK + white work. Hardware is covered by a comprehensive on-site warranty with service cover extendable up to three years.

    SureColor F2160 at a glance:

    • Direct to garment low-cost customisation of shirts, caps, bags, and more
    • Epson UltraChrome® DG ink delivers crisp and bright images with a low tack finish, high stretchability and good wash/UV durability
    • Improved performance and enhanced image quality with smoother gradation, an expanded gamut and Dmax
    • New platen grip pads enable faster loading and setting
    • Upgraded self-cleaning print head and new auto cap washing system for enhanced reliability, reduced maintenance and wastage
    • Supplied with enhanced Epson Garment Creator application software
    • Diethlene glycol free ensures for a safer work environment with Oeko-Tex certification so garments can be worn by adults, children and infants
    • Available in high speed 4 colour and flexible 5 colour with White configurations
    • Comprehensive warranty with service cover extendable up to 3 YEARS
    • Supports a wide range of garments with natural and man-made

    Epson UltraChrome DG Ink was developed to support fabric with a 50% or greater cotton content. It adheres well and fixes easily for images with a low tack finish that have good UV/wash durability. Both the ink and Pre-Treatment liquid when applied to cotton fabrics conform to the latest Oeko-Tex Eco Passport standard with garments safe for use by adults, children and babies.

    Click for more information.

     

  • Print21 – Issue 1072 MIDWEEK SPECIAL

    The Bureau of Stats is ploughing on with its online census strategy, despite the unbridled debacle that occurred last time out. Be interesting to see how it goes this time, and what the take up will be, given the previous experience, and the growing concerns with data privacy.

     

    Welcome to the latest issue of the number one newsletter for the Australian and New Zealand print industries, brought to you by Print21, the people who know print.

     

    Wayne Robinson
    – Editor