Archive for January, 2019

  • Screen Australia

    New Zealand-based label printer Unimax in Auckland, specialises in agriculture, transportation, health and food and beverage labels. With more than 30 years’ experience, the convertor is committed to offering the best value labels as well as promoting best practice environmental business. It aims to reuse or recycle the majority of its physical waste, reduce energy consumption, improve workplace efficiency and safety, and help customers lower their environmental impact.

    To support the growth and competitiveness of its business into the future, Unimax was looking to offer more variety in the printing options available to customers. After considering what is available, it made the decision to invest in a new digital printing solution.

    “We were looking for a digital printing press that offered the highest quality print product, consistency and was the most cost effective,” said Dinesh Kumar, director. “After weighing up the available options, we made the decision that the Screen L350UV stood out as the best solution.”

    Jet Technologies was brought in to consult on the Screen Truepress Jet L350UV with the assistance of Screen GP Australia and Fujifilm NZ. The L350UV offers a modern addition to the Unimax business, that was previously only printed conventionally.

    “By now being able to offer its clients both conventional and digital printing, Unimax is positioned as a fully-rounded label print house,” said Jack Malki, Director, Jet Technologies. “This allows them to offer a variety of options to customers.”

    The benefits of the L350UV

    The Screen L350 was an attractive option for Unimax due to the fact that its high speeds make it a very cost-effective option. Additionally, it delivers a higher uptime of 94 per cent compared to other printers, meaning more throughput and less bottlenecks.

    Digital printing opens up more colour options, including white ink, and the colour is more vibrant. The L350 also ensures that colour consistency is assured on every job.

    Label durability is also another benefit of the printer, with a longevity of 12 months minimum.

    “We needed a press that was capable of high-quality labels that wouldn’t scuff, fade or scratch,” Dinesh explained. “With the L350 we can also print on a wide range of substrates, including textured and silver, which avoids the need for top coating finishes such as foils.”

    “Being digital, the Screen L350 allows for variable data printing, while keeping set-up times low. It also opens the door to much more customisable labels to meet the needs and preferences of customers.”

    The results for Unimax

    Investing in bringing digital printing in house, rather than having to outsource has made Unimax a more competitive and versatile label printing business.

    It has made a big impact on the productivity of Unimax’s label printing, which has enabled the company to increase capacity and take on more customers.

    “The L350 is a very fast printer and on average we’re printing at 50 metres per minute. With the print jobs we’ve been able to move over from conventional printing & we have halved the time required,” Dinesh explained.

    “We’re also now able to offer customers a solution if they have urgent print jobs, as with the L350 we can do these in a day.”

     

  • PIAA turns up the heat on energy policies

    Pressing the energy button. Andrew Macaulay with Prime Minister, Scott Morrison, in Canberra

    Power surges during heatwave conditions are damaging expensive printing equipment of PIAA member companies in another symptom of a dysfunctional power supply system, according to Andrew Macaulay, CEO.

    And right on cue NSW power operators AGL and Origin are both forecasting potential power shortages over today and tomorrow, as they both have broken generators. Between them the two broken generators will take approximately 1300 megawatts of supply out of the system, or around 10 per cent of supply on hot days.

    High-profile power crusader Macaulay is continuing to press for Government action as part of his long-running campaign to keep energy prices for printers on the agenda. He points to the slide into administration of RemaPak, the Sydney-based packaging company, as a symptom of high-priced energy.

    “It’s ludicrous that Australia, one of the largest exporters of gas in the world cannot maintain supply to local industry at reasonable prices. Suppliers are talking about importing liquid natural gas to meet the shortfall, even as we ramp up export volumes from Queensland,” he said.

    Macaulay points to comments by Rod Sims, chairman of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, that manufacturers relying on gas will certainly go under at current prices. Sims maintains there is currently a drastic energy shortage in Australia.

    “All this feeds through to the higher power prices our members are paying as well as the disruptions to supply due to load shedding on hot days. Members are telling me that power surges are blowing up capital-intensive printing equipment as the network struggles to keep up,” he said.

    The latest calls for action reflect a long-running strategy for the Association. According to Macaulay, PIAA members drove the early stages of the national energy policy debate.

    “This is now seeing our Federal and State Governments start to take action to focus on the energy consumer’s need for reliable and less costly delivery. PIAA will continue to prosecute this argument.

    “We have stepped up and negotiated a service on energy efficiency. This programme will offer members services in reducing their energy consumption, and is forecast to deliver significant saving to participants. The service has just commenced to roll out. It will be offered to all Sustainable Green Print accredited members,’ he said.

  • Print21 Issue 1076 – MIDWEEK SPECIAL

     

    Energy is top of the agenda in the printing, packaging and all manufacturing industries, with stratospheric pricing and volatile supply having a major impact. That has to be a significant failure of government policy in a developed country, which could cost print dearly.

     

    Welcome to the ANZ print industry’s major news bulletin, brought to you by Print21 – the people who know print.

     

    Wayne Robinson
    – Editor

     

  • Bobst launches AR remote assistance

    Augmented: remote online visual service from Bobst with Helpline Plus AR

    Packaging solutions supplier Bobst is launching Helpline Plus AR, which it says is the first ever remote assistance service in the packaging industry to incorporate a smart headset with augmented reality (AR) glasses.

    Printers requiring technical assistance can wear the smart headset and connect with experts who can simultaneously see what the user sees and offer advice and support in real time.

    “This is a huge step forward in terms of embracing the latest technology to maximise customer experience,” said Julien Laran, head of business unit services at Bobst. “We believe this will bring significant benefits for our customers, particularly time and cost savings due to the rapid problem-solving this innovation enables. Even before AR, our Helpline service could solve many issues online in less than two hours – we now believe that more issues can be solved and time can be reduced even further.”

    Helpline Plus AR is Wi-Fi connected and it establishes a secure connection with the customer’s machine via the internet. Companies get a Bobst expert on-demand, and with the help of the two-way video and audio live stream, an immediate solution to the issue can be provided.

    “Helpline Plus AR makes for a seamless experience between our customer and our experts, because the Bobst machine is directly connected to the service,” said Julien Laran. “And with the smart headset, both are looking at the same thing at the same time, limiting any risk of confusion. The service bridges knowledge gaps and ultimately adds up to less downtime and increased productivity, as well as an enhanced customer experience.”

    Bobst claims to be the first company in the packaging industry to introduce state-of-the-art remote assistance in augmented reality. Helpline Plus AR is being gradually launched world-wide. Bobst is sold and serviced by Print & Pack in Australia and New Zealand.

  • AGS brings digital offset inking to Australia

    Digitising offset: Cron EZ Color from Australian Graphic Servicing

    Australian Graphic Services (AGS) is launching the Cron EZ Color digital inking system for offset presses, which it says reduces waste, increases quality and brings down profitable run lengths to challenge digital at just 20 sheets.

    According to AGS the Cron EZ Color replaces the conventional mechanical ink duct with an ink pumping system controlled via a digital Expert database, which predicts the exact ink demand, giving accurate control over ink volume for specific printing conditions, and requires no manual intervention to ensure colour consistency.

    Australian Graphic Servicing business development manager, Andrew Dunn said,”This system has been in development for some time and has been refined to the point where it is now ready for our market.”

    Dunn said five commercial benefits are include short-run jobs of just 20 sheets become feasible and competitive; there are significant savings in paper waste, ink waste – up to 20 per cent – and make-ready time cut down to six minutes; more jobs care be done – increasing productivity by up to 30 per cent; colour is accurate, consistent and compliant with ISO standards, and said Dunn the system offers great financial returns.

    Cron says when combined with a Cron CTP the combined system makes it possible to achieve ISO 12647-2 compliance with a single click.

    The EZ Color system allows printers to work continuously without cleaning, and the fast colour changeover greatly increases efficiency.

    Dunn said “If you are thinking of modernising your conventional offset press we now have a great solution for you, any press, any model.”

  • Xerox sees revenue dip

    Revenue falling, profits rising: Xerox

    Global document solutions business Xerox saw its annual revenues for 2018 dip by 4.2 per cent or 4.9 per cent in constant currency terms to US$9.83bn, from US$10.26bn last year, and US$10.77bn the year before.

    The company expects a further five per cent fall in the coming year. Revenue for the final quarter of the year was down by 7.8 per cent, or 6.1 per cent in constant currency terms, to $2.53bn.

    However GAAP earnings per share virtually doubled, up to US$1.38, which represented a 68c increase over the prior year. The adjusted EPS though was $3.46 for the full year, up by 0.01c.

    In its 2019 guidance Xerox is saying GAAP earnings will double again to between $2.60 and $2.70 a share, while adjusted earnigns will rise to between $3.70 and $3.80 a share.

    The Xerox share price has risen by 11 per cent on the latest figures, up to US$27.07, still below the $33 it was sitting at when the Fujifilm bid was launched and rejected / accepted / rejected.

    The company – which spent much of the year in a galactic battle for control between the Board and its two biggest shareholders – is still the subject of a US$6.1bn bid from Fujifilm, its partner in the Fuji Xerox business that services the ANZ market. At the same time Fuijfilm is suing Xerox for $1bn.

    Fujifilm manufactures the Iridesse which has been selling well for Fuji Xerox in Australia and New Zealand, while Xerox itself manufactures the iGen, which is not such a big seller here.

  • Frampton new Visual Connections marcomms manager

    Passionate about print: new Visual Connections marcomms manager Robyn Frampton

    Industry identity Robyn Frampton is the new marketing and communications manager for industry suppliers association Visual Connections.

    Frampton will kick off her new role in a busy year, with PrintEx coming up in Sydney in August, and a new strategic plan developed by the Visual Connections Board which it says ‘sets the organisation on the path to an exciting and pivotal role in a diverse and dynamic industry’.

    Frampton is an experienced communications professional with more than 30 years’ experience in strategy, planning and the delivery of marketing and communications programs, and has strong links with the print and graphic communications sector.

    Following an early career with industry supplier Aldus, then the agent for Heidelberg and other leading brands, she moved into consultancy work and started her own marketing communications business, Frampton PR, 30 years ago Since then, she has worked with clients in industries as diverse as construction, retail, manufacturing, recruitment, healthcare and medical research.

    “We are delighted to welcome Robyn to the team, following a long professional relationship through our founding partners, GAMAA and VISA, and in more recent years as our PR partner for the PacPrint, PrintEx and Visual Impact exhibitions,” said Peter Harper, CEO of Visual Connections.

    “She is passionate about our industry and there are few people who have such a comprehensive knowledge of the print, sign, display and packaging sectors. We know that many of our members and others in the industry – both print service providers and suppliers – already have strong and positive relationships with her.”

    Visual Connections is the premier suppliers’ association for the print, graphics, sign and display industries in Australia. The association’s mandate is to contribute to a sustainable future by supporting these industries through education, sponsorship grants, networking opportunities and exhibitions

  • Unimax steps up for Screen digital labels

    New Zealand-based label printer Unimax in Auckland, is the latest label convertor to install a Screen Truepress Jet L350UV. The combined power and expertise of Jet Technologies, Screen GP Australia and Fujifilm NZ, saw the company halve its production times.

    Unimax specialises in agriculture, transportation, health and food and beverage labels. With more than 30 years’ experience, the convertor is committed to offering the best value labels as well as promoting best practice environmental business. It aims to reuse or recycle the majority of its physical waste, reduce energy consumption, improve workplace efficiency and safety, and help customers lower their environmental impact.

    To support the growth and competitiveness of its business into the future, Unimax was looking to offer more variety in the printing options available to customers. After considering what is available, it made the decision to invest in a new digital printing solution.

    “We were looking for a digital printing press that offered the highest quality print product, consistency and was the most cost effective,” said Dinesh Kumar, director. “After weighing up the available options, we made the decision that the Screen L350UV stood out as the best solution.”

    Jet Technologies was brought in to consult on the Screen Truepress Jet L350UV with the assistance of Screen GP Australia and Fujifilm NZ. The L350UV offers a modern addition to the Unimax business, that was previously only printed conventionally.

    “By now being able to offer its clients both conventional and digital printing, Unimax is positioned as a fully-rounded label print house,” said Jack Malki, Director, Jet Technologies. “This allows them to offer a variety of options to customers.”

    The benefits of the L350UV

    The Screen L350 was an attractive option for Unimax due to the fact that its high speeds make it a very cost-effective option. Additionally, it delivers a higher uptime of 94 per cent compared to other printers, meaning more throughput and less bottlenecks.

    Digital printing opens up more colour options, including white ink, and the colour is more vibrant. The L350 also ensures that colour consistency is assured on every job.

    Label durability is also another benefit of the printer, with a longevity of 12 months minimum.

    “We needed a press that was capable of high-quality labels that wouldn’t scuff, fade or scratch,” Dinesh explained. “With the L350 we can also print on a wide range of substrates, including textured and silver, which avoids the need for top coating finishes such as foils.”

    “Being digital, the Screen L350 allows for variable data printing, while keeping set-up times low. It also opens the door to much more customisable labels to meet the needs and preferences of customers.”

    The results for Unimax

    Investing in bringing digital printing in house, rather than having to outsource has made Unimax a more competitive and versatile label printing business.

    It has made a big impact on the productivity of Unimax’s label printing, which has enabled the company to increase capacity and take on more customers.

    “The L350 is a very fast printer and on average we’re printing at 50 metres per minute. With the print jobs we’ve been able to move over from conventional printing & we have halved the time required,” Dinesh explained.

    “We’re also now able to offer customers a solution if they have urgent print jobs, as with the L350 we can do these in a day.”

     

  • M&S ‘no pack’ is a threat to printed volumes – Laurel Brunner

    Marks & Spencer, the UK-based multinational retailer, is replacing packaging on 90 lines of loose fruit and vegetables with no packaging at all. Instead it will have available live action green grocers, people with pulses as it were.

    They will assist customers with their vegetable purchases, and along with cooking tips and storage advice, will provide compostable punnets for the more delicate fruits and veg. The rest will just go straight into a shopping bag and there will be no “best before” dates.

    How radical is that? Well not really, although it’s pretty dramatic for the twenty-first century. For those who remember shopping in the high street or village shop, this approach to service is a step back in time to a less overly engineered and packaged age. For younger generations it will be a novelty and a salve to their consciences. Hopefully people will respond positively and M&S will get a return.

    This is a serious matter both environmentally and for retailers who may want to follow suit. It is eminently sensible to revert to a packaging model that is neither excessive or over-engineered, and to using packaging only when necessary. It’s a sensible approach based on environmental realities as well as the practicalities of packaging and customer expectations. If other food retailers take the M&S lead, we can expect a profound drop in the amount of packaging waste and also in printed packaging volumes.

    Gloomy as it looks for graphics professionals, the trend away from excess packaging might create new opportunities. There’s the obvious, such as for signage or storage and cooking guidance that doesn’t rely on plastic. Less obvious is wrapping sheets and paper bags printed with bar codes and branded for different fruits and veg. Add nutrition info and recipe ideas and you’ve got a whole new printed packaging format. Link it to ideas sharing on social media and the picture looks even rosier.

    For those members of the packaging community who have thrived on packaging every vegetable in sight, from potatoes to avocados, it’s time to look ahead. The M&S move may backfire but it’s just a matter of time before packaging gets reinvented along more sustainable lines and without the plastic. Better to have it all wrapped up in advance than to be left behind.

    – Laurel Brunner

    This article was produced by the Verdigris Project, an industry initiative intended to raise awareness of print’s positive environmental impact. This weekly commentary helps printing companies keep up to date with environmental standards, and how environmentally friendly business management can help improve their bottom lines. Verdigris is supported by the following companies: Agfa Graphics, EFI, Fespa, HP, Kodak, Kornit, Ricoh, Spindrift, Splash PR, Unity Publishing and Xeikon.

  • Print21 Issue 1075 – WEEKEND SPECIAL

     

    Industry news today is led by the supplier side as major companies make major investments in print. The continuing development of technology in printing is surely good news for all of us.

    Welcome to the latest industry newsletter for Australian and New Zealand print businesses, brought to you by Print21, the people who know print.

     

    Wayne Robinson
    – Editor

  • Chinese to buy strategic stake in Heidelberg

    Leading press manufacturer welcomes the support of Masterwork Group, China’s largest manufacturer of die-cutters and hot-foil embossing machines. Based in the Chinese city of Tianjin, long-standing strategic partner Masterwork is set to get 8.5 percent of Heidelberg under a cash injection.

    The proposed capital increase will make Masterwork a strategic anchor shareholder with a long-term investment horizon. Gallus under Ferd Rüesch became the first anchor shareholder when the family-owned label press manufacturer was folded into the German press company in 2014.

    Subject to approval by the relevant bodies on both sides and the Chinese authorities, the deal will take place by the end of the first calendar quarter of 2019. The issue price of the new shares is set to be EUR 2.68. If the market price significantly outstrips the envisaged issue price, this will be renegotiated in line with statutory requirements.

    Heidelberg will use the extra money to accelerate its digital agenda and for general business financing. Heidelberg believes Masterwork supports its digital strategy and is demonstrating clear commitment to long-term collaboration. It is currently considering and discussing whether it will seek to obtain a shareholding in Masterwork, which is listed on China’s Shenzhen stock exchange.

    According to Heidelberg CEO,Rainer Hundsdörfer, (pictured) the deal will open up further potential in the growing packaging printing segment, especially in China – the world’s largest individual market. “We are expecting better capacity utilisation at our plants across the globe to make us far more efficient, but I would like to stress that this will not weaken our sites in Germany. We are delighted that in Masterwork we are obtaining another long-term investor that firmly believes in the company’s innovative prowess, strategy, and potential for the future.”

    Masterwork President Li Li was equally upbeat. “Heidelberg is our ideal partner for jointly leveraging growth potential in the packaging printing market. The stake we are obtaining in this long-established company and world market leader underlines that we are in it for the long haul and are confident Heidelberg has adopted the right strategy.”

    The two companies have had a close manufacturing and sales partnership for a number of years since Masterwork acquired the Heidelberg’s postpress packaging technologies in 2014. Packaging printing is expected to enjoy above-average growth in the coming years. Heidelberg already holds a strong position in this segment in Europe and the Americas. Masterwork is one of China’s leading postpress suppliers for packaging.

    Heidelberg will continue to supply markets in China and the rest of Asia from the site in Qingpu, near Shanghai, that it established back in 2006. It says that as a result of the closer working relationship, it will also benefit from joint component manufacturing operations at the Masterwork site in Tianjin in the future.

  • EFI investing in print opportunities

    Innovate and execute: EFI tells Connect audience it will deliver, pictured is new CEO Bill Muir (right) with Print21 editor Wayne Robinson

    EFI presented its ongoing investment across the board in print at its Connect 2019 user group event, saying that opportunities for print businesses are expanding rapidly, particularly into new areas.

    New CEO Bill Muir highlighted packaging and textiles as two sectors that the company believed digital print could have a major impact in, and the rest of the event saw company division leaders outline developments and business opportunities.

    Some 1800 printers – including several from Australian franchise groups and major printers – spent four days at the Wynn in Las Vegas, a sprawling complex that accommodates several thousand people in what has to be one of the world’s best hotels, and includes a variety of restaurants, bars, nightclubs, theatres, swimming pools, and the obligatory gigantic casino (minimum bet $10 daytime, $25 after dark).

    EFI continues to invest around 15-16 per cent of its business in R+D, resulting in a raft of new products and technologies coming to the market. These include the new Version 7 Productivity Suite, updates to its inkjet printing equipment – there are now some 39 different wide format print systems alone – and a new Fiery processor that can operate at twice the speed of existing solutions.

    The company also revealed it would be launching some groundbreaking technology at drupa next year, including one for instant curing. Muir said his mission as new CEO was to provide innovative solutions to the market that came with great execution, and to ensure EFI was çustomer obsessed.

    Highlights of the week included a presentation by Cirque Du Soleil (which has seven shows on the go at all times in Las Vegas) on its costume creation and its impending move to digital printing for costumes, and 15-year-old fashion designer Ariel Swedore highlighting digital textile capabilities.

    Look out for the full EFI Connect report, and an exclusive interview with new CEO Bill Muir, in the upcoming Print21 magazine.

    Digital textiles: Cirque Du Soleil at EFI Connect

  • Digital train pulls into Print Station

    Lewis Liang (left) and HP Indigo operator Sonny Qi at the forefront of NSW commercial printing.

    Sydney printer Print Station has invested in a trio of digital machines supplied by Currie Group: an HP Indigo 7600 digital press, a Scodix S75 digital enhancement press, and a Horizon SmartSlitter. Jake Nelson went along to see how they have transformed the business.

    Print Station, a full-service commercial printer, operates two sites close by one another in Sydney’s south: one on busy Forest Road in Hurstville, and a larger facility in Carlton, five minutes away. It is this second plant that recently became home to the new equipment manager Lewis Liang purchased from Currie Group. “We’ve always trusted Currie Group. Horizon, HP Indigo and Scodix are quality brands with good products and excellent service,” he says.

    The feeling is mutual, with Currie Group’s Will Currie dropping in regularly on the dynamic printing company. “We have a good relation-ship with Lewis. He is making giant leaps in developing his business.

    “He is at the forefront of the movement of taking more work in-house to deal with the rapidly-changing print environment. The Scodix is only the second in NSW,” says Currie.

    The digital and offset printer specialises in short to medium runs of up to 200,000 copies, including business cards, brochures, letterheads, and presentation folders; it also produces wide-format offerings such as signs, banners, and displays. “We’ve been in digital printing for about six or seven years. We do a fair bit of it as well as wide-format and offset,” says Liang.

    Installed in time for the busy Christmas season, the new HP Indigo 7600 press, plus Scodix finisher and Horizon SmartSlitter, have been a big help to the company. “It’s great. We’re picking up new jobs, and things have been going much faster and more smoothly than before,” says Liang.

    According to Liang, the main driver behind the HP Indigo purchase – a first for Print Station – was the quality that the platform offers. “It’s similar to offset, not like the traditional dry toner-based digital printing. There’s no way dry toner can match the quality.

    “There’s hardly any difference when you present offset and Indigo digital print, especially on uncoated stock,” he says. “When you compare the HP Indigo digital print with our LED UV offset print, it’s a perfect match. This HP Indigo press has been a big step for us.”

    Though there has been a learning curve, Liang and his staff are growing more confident with operating the 7600. “It’s good, we’re getting better every day,” he says. “We’re improving our skill. It’s not as easy to use as regular digital presses – it’s different, sitting between offset and traditional toner-based.”

    The Scodix S75 digital enhancement press has enabled Print Station to also handle embellishment work like spot UV and special effect printing. “It’s adding extra value to our print, and lets us offer a bit more for our customers. We can provide something a little more fancy now on things like business cards,” says Liang. “It’s evolved our business, and will definitely increase our product range as well.”

    As for the Horizon SmartSlitter, Liang has been pleased to team it up with the S75. “The SmartSlitter works well with the Scodix, producing raised and embellished business cards, for example,” says Liang. “You can’t use a guillotine for that, you have to use a slitter. We’re using it more for other applications as well, such as multiple scoring and perforations.”

    Liang is pleased with the new kit, as well as the support Currie Group provides. “The equipment really helps, and Currie Group service is the best. If something goes wrong, they always send someone out quickly to resolve the problem.

    “We’ve been buying from them for more than 20 years, and we’re always impressed with the quality of their equipment and their unparalleled service,” he says.

    Will Currie is also impressed with Print Station and its owner. “Lewis has always been a very loyal customer. He’s a full-range commercial printer who’s definitely going places, and I’m looking forward to working with him for years to come,” he says.

  • Winds of change: PIAA’s new Jedi master

    Passionate print champion: Stephanie Gaddin.

    Industry consultant Stephanie Gaddin, known to clients and acquaintances as “Yoda”, has joined Printing Industries as its new membership communications manager and is set to take up the role from the start of next month.

    Gaddin comes to the association with years of experience in the sector as a Victorian government scholarship recipient, volunteer print ambassador, and ex-CEO of Print MIS company Dolphin Worxs. Before joining PIAA, she performed consulting, contracting, and digital marketing work for companies ranging from small owner-operated businesses to large corporates.

    Andrew Macaulay, CEO PIAA, hailed Gaddin as a passionate champion for the industry. “We look forward to her enthusiasm and energy promoting print advocacy. Steph will hit the ground running,” he said. “In fact, she will attend an industry event in Melbourne on Wednesday next week, representing PIAA even before she officially commences.”

    Walter Kuhn, PIAA president, agrees, saying Gaddin will be able to deliver new markets for printers and help them capture the hearts and minds of the younger generations.

    “Steph ardently believes that there is enormous untapped value in print industry and collaboration opportunities for cross channel campaigns abound. She aims help printers find and make the most of the millennial sub-culture that is obsessed with paper and paper products,” he said.

  • Nanopress with Fiery RIP gets FOGRA nod

    Benny Landa shows off Nanographic print quality at an event at his production plant in Israel.

    The Israeli-based Nanographic printing system joins other digital brands in gaining quality assurance from the German-based graphics research institute. The EFI Fiery digital front end technology driving the Landa S10 Nanographic Printing Press is the first system to receive an expanded Validation Printing System certification.

    Landa and EFI join brands such as Konica Minolta, Canon, Ricoh and Fuji Xerox in using the FograCert to benchmark printing quality. The new cert extends the test beyond validating a single print to evaluating the stability of an entire print run to ISO standards.

    EFI announced the certification at its Connect conference in Las Vegas this week

    According to a Landa spokesperson the Fogra seal of approval is an important step towards assuring customers of the consistency of the Nanographic presses. The certification covers combination printing systems that include a printing system, driving software, colour management software, substrate, and a simulated printing condition that accurately represents today’s print production process.

    “The Fogra seal is an important validation of the quality of our Landa S10 Nanographic Printing Press,” said Gilad Tzori, VP of product strategy. “It also validates our choice of partnering with EFI. While certification based on a single print has been the standard for some time, we believe this new certification, which tests print run stability, is an important validation of the Landa S10 print quality.”

    The roll out of the Landa Nanographic system continues, albeit in an unusually low-key manner. Following the flamboyant launches at the past two drupa shows by Benny Landa, there are now at least four installations – in Israel, Germany, Switzerland and the USA. They are soon to be joined by the first Chinese press. Komori is predicting it will have a beta site for its Nanographic press in the first half of this year somewhere in Japan.

    The Fogra certification will go a long way towards rebutting perceptions that the Nanographic printing system is unstable over long runs. The partnership with EFI at first presented challenges to the venture  but the complete printing system now seems to be well grounded in quality and consistency.

    “By meeting new validation requirements like the FograCert Validation Printing System certification, EFI and Landa are working to ensure that printing companies’ customers can have greater confidence in the print they buy, which ultimately helps create more opportunities for growth in high-volume digital printing,” said John Henze, vice president, EFI Fiery

     

  • Kornit aims for peak with new Atlas

    Kornit Atlas: Industrial scale t-shirt and garment digital printing

    Kornit Digital has launched Atlas, a new heavy-duty direct-to-garment (DTG) printer created to produce digital t-shirt and garment decoration on an industrial scale.

    Supplied in Australia by Kiwo, the Atlas will deliver a typical annual production capacity of up to 350,000 impressions.

    It is aimed at highly productive garment decorators, mid to large size screen printers, and, according to Kornit, businesses looking to combine digital technology with the lowest cost of ownership for a move into textiles.

    It will typically be used in  flexible garment production for print-on-demand and e-commerce, producing run lengths from one to 1,000, with set-up time virtually zero according to Kornit.

    The system is equipped with new recirculating print heads and comes with a newly developed ink, NeoPigment Eco-Rapid. The Atlas has a CMYKRG plus white colour gamut.

    The printing engine features an enhanced version of Kornit’s HD technology, with a rip that combine to produce, according to Kornit,  the highest standards of retail quality and durability.

    The Atlas comes ready for Kornit’s future releases of its cloud-based business intelligence, productivity analytics and optimisation software platforms, scheduled to be released in the second half of the year.

    Omer Kulka, Kornit’s VP of marketing and product strategy, comments, “This is a huge leap forward, not only for Kornit, but also for the direct-to-garment industry as a whole. We have delivered the Atlas on the collective feedback of thousands of Kornit systems’ operators and on the experience collected from hundreds of millions of printed garments.”

    The new NeoPigment Eco-Rapid ink is a main driver of the Atlas’ retail quality prints. Kornit says it provides a white ink opacity, matched to those of conventional screen inks, and meets highest durability standards on multiple fabric types. Its increased colour gamut and saturation allow for deep full tones and precise spot colour matching.

     The new Eco-Rapid ink will be integrated with new Storm HD6 and Avalanche HD6/HDK systems and will also be retrofitted to existing Kornit HD systems. Kornit intends to switch all existing HD customers to NeoPigment Eco-Rapid during the year.

    Atlas can be viewed in live demonstrations at at Fespa Munich from 14-17 May.

  • Last call for Pride in Print awards entries

    Pride in Print: celebrating the best in New Zealand print

    There is less than a week to go until regular entry for the Pride In Print Awards 2019 closes at the end of the month.

    Awards can be entered by 31 January at the special rate of $75 per entry for online entries and $95 for paper entries.

    Final award entry deadline is the end of February, but a late fee will apply for entries submitted after 31 January.

    Visit www.prideinprintawards.co.nz for more information and to submit your entries.

    If you have any queries please call Lauren on 04 237 0482 or email lauren@promoteltd.co.nz.