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Print’s ‘ageing and static workforce’: study

Wednesday, 21 March 2018
By Graham Osborne
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A research group chaired by PIAA CEO Andrew Macaulay has identified three core issues in attracting new talent to the industry: “perception and reputation of the sector; working conditions and prospects; and in many cases, an ageing and static workforce.”

The study also noted: Recent industry changes include developments in data storage capabilities, with big players such as HP and Fuji Xerox developing 3D hardware and software in partnership with firms for implementation over the next 12 months.

The Printing and Graphic Arts Industry Reference Committee (IRC), in conjunction with PwC’s Skills for Australia initiative, released a 48-page draft of its Industry Skills Forecast and Proposed Schedule of Work (ISFPSW) review, which aims to “refocus the discussion about the skills and training needed in the industry.”

The ten-member IRC includes chairman Andrew Macaulay, deputy chair Lorraine Cassin (National Secretary, Australian Manufacturing Workers Union, Print Division) and members Robert Black (Holmesglen Institute Program Manager – Printing), Ben Eaton (CEO Starleaton), Kerim El Gabaili (CEO OnePoint), Julie Hobbs (CEO FutureNow, Creative and Leisure Industries Training Council/Design Institute of Australia), Peter Lane (MD, Lane Print Group), Michelle Lees (Marketing Manager – Graphic Solutions HP PPS Australia), Brett Maishman (National Industry Manager, Fuji Xerox Australia), and Michael de Souza (CEO Australian 3D Manufacturing Association).

‘This review presents the opportunity for industry to get involved’: Paul Mitchell, PIAA.

“At PIAA, we constantly hear about the challenges businesses have in finding appropriately trained employees, or having opportunities for formal training in the right areas,” says Paul Mitchell, the association’s national workplace relations manager. “This review presents the opportunity for industry to get involved, and ensure the training needs of printers are considered in future training programmes,” Mitchell says.

The Skills Forecast draft says industry feedback, combined with research and analysis, indicates the following trends will be shaping current and future skills needs:

Market adjustment
The printing and graphic arts sector does not just generate print media and there are several areas of potential growth such as customised direct mail advertising, food labelling and packaging, and other consumer goods.

Reputation and workforce transition
Based on consultation with the Printing and Graphic Arts IRC and our own research and analysis, attracting new talent and maintaining talent appears to be stemming from three core issues: perception and reputation of the sector; working conditions and prospects; and in many cases, an ageing and static workforce.

Customisation and multi-channel marketing
In response to market adjustments, industry participants are expanding into non-traditional service offerings, such as data driven customisation and multi-channel marketing whilst retaining printing as a core service offering and will therefore still employ workers in printing and design occupations.

Technological change
Technological changes continue to impact the demand of roles in which people work and the service offerings of the industry.
1. Recent industry changes include developments in data storage capabilities, with big players such as HP and Fuji Xerox developing 3D hardware and software in partnership with firms for implementation over the next 12 months. Additionally, there have been significant price reductions in commercial technology.
2. Over the past year, there have been advancements in 3D printing with innovations in aerospace manufacturing and Monash University producing the world’s first 3D printed jet engine in just four months.

The study also predicts a 16.7 percent fall in printing jobs in the five years to May 2022.

The full review draft is available here: 

Review draft Industry Skills Forecast & Proposed Schedule of Work

Download feedback form

More information about the Printing and Graphic Arts Industry Reference Committee can be found at: https://www.skillsforaustralia.com/industries/printing-and-graphic-arts/

 

 

One Response to “Print’s ‘ageing and static workforce’: study”

  1. March 21, 2018 at 2:42 pm,

    Survivor
    said:

    We hardly needed a royal commission to come up with this.

    Lets just spread more negative press to encourage new entrants to the printing employment market, and persuade those already in the industry to leave.

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