Posts Tagged ‘Banknotes’

  • Banknote printers claim they have been bludgeoned back to work

    Note Printing Australia at Craigieburn, Victoria.

    Workers at the Reserve Bank’s banknote printing business Note Printing Australia (NPA) have ended their industrial action and voted to accept a 2.5% pay increase after the company threatened an indefinite lockout, according to the AMWU.

    “We came to a resolution at a mass meeting last night to accept the deal, so all the bans are now off and the workers have returned to normal duties,” says AMWU print organiser Mick Bull. “It was not a unanimous vote but it was comprehensive, with about 80% of workers in favour.

    “It’s a disappointing result but we’ve been bludgeoned into accepting it after the company threatened an indefinite lockout of workers. The workers are not happy, they’re pissed off, but the company wouldn’t budge and threatened to lock out everyone indefinitely.”

    In a statement, the AMWU’s head office described the agreement as a win for workers.

    Union members at Note Printing Australia (NPA) are celebrating after voting up an enterprise agreement that delivers significant wins in their wages and conditions. After almost 3 months of protected action, NPA improved their offer to the workers to include: 5 days of standalone domestic and family violence leave; casual conversion changes including instantaneous conversion to permanent work for some long-term casual workers; improved consultation on contractors; and a 2.5% wage rise per year for the 3 year agreement.

    AMWU Assistant State Secretary for Print Tony Piccolo hailed the workers for taking a stand for a better deal and leading the way for other workers around the country to fight for improved pay rises, secure jobs, and standalone paid family and domestic violence leave.

    “It was pretty galling for the workers to hear the RBA Governor call for 3.5% pay rises in one breath and then refuse that same pay rise to their own subsidiary’s workers in the next,” he said. “Just yesterday we heard again that Australian wages are basically going backwards – not keeping up with CPI and cost of living. But in the end it wasn’t just about the pay rise. The workers were willing to accept 2.5% as long as they received the upfront domestic and family violence leave clause in their agreement and secure jobs for casual workers.

    “It really shouldn’t come to this, for workers to have to strike and sacrifice a few days pay to win a fair wage rise in their agreement, when everyone agrees that Australians need a pay rise. It’s another clear-cut example of why we need to change the rules,” said Piccolo.

    Note Printing Australia locked out half its work force last Friday in retaliation for ongoing industrial action by the AMWU, provoking the remaining workers to go on a one-day strike in support. The workers returned to the Craigieburn plant on Monday but had maintained work bans on overtime and software implementation in support of a pay rise of 3.5% – compared to the NPA’s offer of 2.5%.

    “The deal we’ve agreed on is for a 2.5% wage increase that will be underpinned by wage indexation, so if that’s higher then we go to the higher rate,” said Bull. “At the moment, it stands at 2.1% and if it goes over 2.5% in years two and three then we will get the higher amount. We’ve also agreed on five days upfront domestic violence leave per annum and we’ve received a commitment to discuss the issue of long-term casuals, some of whom have been in the job seven or eight years.”

    The AMWU negotiated a separate agreement with RBA white collar workers, mostly based in Sydney. They will receive a 2% pay rise which could increase up to 5% with bonuses.

    Note Printing Australia is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Reserve Bank of Australia.

  • Printers locked out at high-tech Reserve Bank print plant

    Note Printing Australia locked out half its work force this morning in retaliation for ongoing industrial action by the AMWU, provoking the remaining workers to go on a one-day strike in support.

    The workers will return on Monday maintaining their ongoing work bans on overtime and software implementation. They’re demanding a pay rise from the NPA, whose board of directors is made up of Reserve Bank members. The prolonged negotiations are snagged on a difference of one per cent with the union demanding 3.5 per cent to the NPA’s offer of 2.5 per cent.

    According to Mick Bull, AMWU organiser, this morning’s picket was the result of the company’s actions. “We’re open to negotiations with the board but they won’t meet us. They only send their HR people who don’t have any authority to negotiate,” he said.

    A petition signed by the entire workforce demanding a meeting with the Board was presented to the company. The enterprise bargain at the Craigieburn plant covers three unions, with the majority, 120 workers, belonging to the AMWU. One hour industrial stoppages are planned to continue with the threat of further escalation next week. A mass meeting of workers voted to continue the bans.

    Bull points out what he terms the hypocrisy of Reserve Bank governor, Philip Lowe, who’s on record as encouraging workers to demand largest pay rises. He is reported to have told politicians that average annual wage increases need to be about 3.5 per cent to achieve average inflation of 2.5 per cent, the middle of the bank’s target.

    NPA was contacted but didn’t get back with any comment or explanation before deadline.

    The industrial strife comes as NPA is congratulating itself on completing the ‘next generation banknote’ series (NGB) with Malcolm McDowell, CEO, claiming the production and issue of the complex banknotes highlights the company’s ability to industrialise innovative new security technologies, and high-end security printing. NPA took part in the international SUSI Optics Specimen Note project along with suppliers LenSys, KBA NotaSys, SICPA and KURZ. In addition to printing Australian banknotes and currency for such countries as Singapore and Chile, NPA also produces Australia’s passports.

  • ‘Some movement’ in banknote action: AMWU

    Note Printing Australia at Craigieburn, Victoria.

    Note Printing Australia (NPA) has given ground in its standoff with workers engaged in industrial action, increasing its pay offer and signalling a willingness to resolve a classification review.

    Tony Piccolo.

    According to Tony Piccolo, assistant secretary for print at AMWU Victoria, bans on overtime, material handling, and the use of some software applications have cut productivity at NPA’s Craigieburn plant by 20 percent, and management has shown ‘some movement’ towards resolving the situation that led workers to launch industrial action on May 25. “The company upped the wage offer to 2.5 percent in a meeting yesterday, and we’re confident we can get some resolution over the updates to classification structure, which just leaves the negotiations over the pay increase, domestic violence leave, and casual conversion for labour hire,” he said.

    Though the unions are preparing to apply for further protected action if necessary, Piccolo is optimistic that an agreement between workers and management is not far off. “Yesterday’s meeting was positive and we’re hoping that the movement from the company will get us to where we need to be. I’m confident both parties want a resolution sooner rather than later,” he said.

    Note Printing Australia is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Reserve Bank, whose governor Phillip Lowe called for a 3.5 percent increase in wages across the country in February. Piccolo has challenged NPA management, and the RBA, to lead by example. “The members just want a fair agreement that delivers the wage rises the RBA itself is calling for,” he said.

    NPA has produced Australian banknotes for more than 100 years, evolving from T.S. Harrison’s original print works that produced Australia’s first circulating banknote series in 1913. The RBA declined to comment.

  • Cash flow down 20% at Note Printing

    Note Printing Australia at Craigieburn, VIC.

    Workers at money printing facility Note Printing Australia (NPA) – a subsidiary of the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) – are stepping up industrial action that has cut the production of Australian banknotes by 20 percent, according to the Australian Manufacturing Workers’ Union (AMWU).

    In May, about 97 percent of AMWU and Electrical Trades Union (ETU) workers at the Craigieburn plant in Victoria voted in favour of work stoppages and overtime bans to support their claims for a four percent wage rise, a casual conversion clause for labour hire and domestic violence leave.

    “There has still been no movement from the company at this stage so we’re imposing further bans on the use of some software applications and mobile work phones,” says AMWU Victoria print assistant secretary Tony Piccolo. “The company has told workers that production is already down 20 percent. These new measures will restrict production further.”

    Piccolo noted RBA Governor Philip Lowe’s recent speech at an Australian Industry Group event in which he raised concerns about businesses cutting costs through wages. 

    “It’s hypocritical of the RBA to deny their own workers fair pay rises while calling for pay rises to boost the economy,” Piccolo says.

    Bans on a number of software applications are due to begin next week. The unions have called on the NPA and the RBA to meet with workers as soon as possible.

    NPA, Craigieburn, VIC.

    NPA has produced Australian banknotes for more than 100 years, evolving from T.S. Harrison’s original print works that produced Australia’s first circulating banknote series in 1913.

     

     

     

  • Show us the money, say banknote printers

    Note Printing Australia at Craigieburn, Victoria.

    About 100 employees of Note Printing Australia (NPA) showed up at the picket line today to demand better pay and conditions. The one-day strike is part of a series of industrial actions following months of unsuccessful negotiation with management.

    Tony Piccolo.

    NPA employs about 150-160 union members across the AMWU, Finance Sector Union (FSU) and Electrical Trades Union (ETU) at its facility in Craigieburn, Victoria. 97 percent of employees approved the industrial action seeking to force management back to the table to negotiate for better pay without sacrificing conditions. “The members rejected the company’s proposal in terms of selling off conditions for a pay increase, and we’re hopeful that the company comes back next week with a better offer,” said Tony Piccolo, assistant secretary for print at AMWU Victoria. “The action is going ahead, it’s well-attended. We had a breakfast of champions to start it off, people were there from 6am, and at 10am we said enjoy the weekend.”

    Outstanding issues include a four percent pay rise, a casual conversion clause for labour hire, 20 days domestic violence leave, and completion of a classification review which has been negotiated for 12 months with no resolution. “The members just want a fair agreement that delivers the wage rises the RBA itself is calling for,” said Piccolo.

    NPA has produced Australian banknotes for more than 100 years, evolving from T.S. Harrison’s original print works that produced Australia’s first circulating banknote series in 1913. It is a subsidiary of the Reserve Bank of Australia, which declined to comment.

  • Banknote printers to down tools next Friday

    Employees will stop work for one day next Friday May 25 if Note Printing Australia (NPA) doesn’t come back to the table, as part of a series of industrial actions following months of unsuccessful negotiation with management.

    Tony Piccolo.

    The industrial action approved by an overwhelming 97 percent of employees is aimed at bringing management back to negotiate with workers, according to Tony Piccolo, assistant secretary for print at AMWU Victoria. “We’re hoping that with the strong ballot result and the planned industrial action, the company will return to the table with a renewed offer,” he said.

    The union is demanding a four percent pay rise for employees, as well as a labour-hire casual conversion clause, a domestic violence clause, and a review of the classification structure to be completed. “It’s our without-prejudice offer, and is subject to change depending on the company’s willingness to negotiate prior to any industrial action,” said Piccolo.

    Note Printing Australia is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Reserve Bank, whose governor Phillip Lowe called for a 3.5 percent increase in wages across the country in February. Piccolo has challenged NPA management, and the RBA, to lead by example. “The members just want a fair agreement that delivers the wage rises the RBA itself is calling for. But the workers have shown through this very strong result in the protected action ballot that they are willing to take action if the company refuses to come to the table,” he said.

    NPA has produced Australian banknotes for more than 100 years, evolving from T.S. Harrison’s original print works that produced Australia’s first circulating banknote series in 1913. Management was unavailable for comment.

  • Money printers vote for industrial action

    Note Printing Australia at Craigieburn, Victoria.

    Workers at Australia’s money printing facility Note Printing Australia – a subsidiary of the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) – have voted overwhelmingly in favour of work stoppages after months of unsuccessful negotiations over wage rises.

    The Australian Manufacturing Workers’ Union (AMWU) says the talks over a new enterprise agreement for workers at the Craigieburn, Victoria facility have “hit a brick wall.”

    AMWU print assistant secretary Tony Piccolo says it’s hypocritical of the RBA to deny their own workers fair pay rises while at the same time calling for pay rises to boost the economy.

    “RBA boss Phillip Lowe called on business to lift wages to boost household incomes and keep the economy on track, yet he won’t deliver this for his own workforce,” says Piccolo. “Dr Lowe told Parliament in February that he wanted to see 3.5% wage rises across the country. Then why is he refusing this acknowledge the hard work of his own workers with a 3.5% pay rise – rather than the 2% he’s offering, which is barely above inflation?”

    The protected action ballot resulted in almost 97 percent of workers voting in favour of industrial action including work stoppages and overtime bans, according to a joint statement by the AMWU and the Electrical Trades Union (ETU).

    “We support Dr Lowe’s calls for wage rises,” says ETU Victoria secretary Troy Gray. “But he needs to get his own house in order before he next approaches the pulpit. If even the people who literally print money won’t treat their workers with respect and fairness, then clearly we have to change the rules so workers can get the pay rises we deserve. Even the Reserve Bank won’t give workers a pay rise willingly.”

    The unions called on Note Printing Australia and the RBA to sit down with the workers to resolve the dispute as soon as possible and deliver the much-needed pay rise to their workers.

    “The members just want a fair agreement that delivers the wage rises the RBA itself is calling for,” says Piccolo. “But the workers have shown through this very strong result in the protected action ballot that they are willing to take action if the company refuses to come to the table.”

    NPA has produced Australian banknotes for more than 100 years, evolving from T.S. Harrison’s original print works that produced Australia’s first circulating banknote series in 1913.

     

     

  • Forgers in the crosshairs as RBA unveils new $50

    The Reserve Bank of Australia has revealed the design for the updated $50 note, set to enter circulation in October. As with the new $5 and $10 notes, the $50 will be upgraded with new security features to deter forgers from copying the most-counterfeited banknote in Australia.

    Australia’s 686 million $50 notes represent 45 percent of all bills in circulation, and at $3.4 billion, make up 47 percent of total value. They are the most commonly counterfeited denomination in circulation: of the 25.5 thousand counterfeit notes detected in Australia in 2016-17, 20.7 thousand, or 81.4 percent, were $50 notes.

    According to James Holloway, deputy head of note issue at the RBA, the $50, being commonly received from ATMs, offers counterfeiters a sweet spot of reasonably high value with little chance of detection. “Some lower-denomination notes are counterfeited, but the $50 is by far the most common. The $100 tends to be noticed more, because they’re not seen as often,” said Holloway.

    With the success of the new $5 and $10 designs, the RBA was confident enough to move the $50 ahead of the $20 in the schedule. “It makes sense to start with lower denominations to test how they go, make sure the production goes OK, and give the public time to get used to the new notes as well as the industry time to get the equipment together,” said Holloway. “So far it’s going very well on the security side, which was the intention. It’s a significant leap forward, and these should be a lot harder to counterfeit.”

    The signature side of the new $50 note, featuring Aboriginal writer and inventor David Unaipon.

    Philip Lowe, RBA.

    Philip Lowe, governor of the RBA, says the new $50 offers the same boost to security that the updated $5 and $10 did. “Improved security and ease of recognition underpin the design of the new $50 banknote. With the release of the $5 and $10 during the past two years, we are confident the Australian public are becoming familiar with the new banknote security features,” said Lowe.

    These features include a clear top-to-bottom strip with dynamic features, microprint of Edith Cowan’s maiden speech to Parliament and excerpts from David Unaipon’s work, and a rolling-colour patch. The note also includes four raised bumps to assist the vision-impaired community; the new $5 has one and the new $10 has two.

    The serial number side of the new $50 note, featuring Edith Cowan, Australia’s first female MP.

    As with the current design, the new $50 note will depict Aboriginal writer and inventor David Unaipon on the signature side, and Edith Cowan, Australia’s first female MP, on the serial number side. “David Unaipon and Edith Cowan were campaigners for social change and we are proud to continue featuring them on the $50 banknote. The new banknote provides the opportunity to tell more of the rich story behind these distinguished Australians,” said Lowe.

    All Australian banknotes are printed by Note Printing Australia (NPA), a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Reserve Bank. The printing process is complex and highly involved, incorporating offset, intaglio and letterpress stages to maximise security against counterfeiting. The Reserve Bank declined to comment on the specific machinery used.

    The RBA will update the $20 note next year.

  • RBA prints $1.2 billion in new $10 notes

    The signature side of the new $10 note, featuring writer and poet ‘Banjo’ Paterson.

    The Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) has rolled out the updated $10 note, which incorporates new security features intended to deter counterfeiters.

    Approximately 120 million of the new $10 notes have been printed, at a total value of almost 1.2 billion dollars. This accounts for eight percent of the total number and two percent of the total value of Australian banknotes, according to figures released in June 2016. “The Bank has produced enough new banknotes to replace all those in circulation,” an RBA spokesman told Print21.

    The banknote, launched a year after the revised $5 bill, retains the images of AB ‘Banjo’ Paterson and Dame Mary Gilmore from the old design. It adds security features similar to the new-look $5, including rolling colour patches, a clear strip from top to bottom, and images that fluoresce under ultraviolet light. Tactile features are also included for the vision-impaired community, including two raised bumps near the top of the $10 (as opposed to one on the $5).

    The serial number side of the new $10 note, featuring writer and journalist Dame Mary Gilmore.

    Philip Lowe, RBA.

    The note is the first to feature the signature of Philip Lowe, who succeeded Glenn Stevens as Reserve Bank governor on September 18 last year. “The launch of the new $10 banknote is a milestone in our program to deliver Australians banknotes at the cutting edge in terms of security against counterfeiting. It continues the tradition of celebrating two of Australia’s most prominent writers,” Lowe said.

    All Australian banknotes are printed by Note Printing Australia (NPA), a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Reserve Bank. The printing process is complex and highly involved, incorporating offset, intaglio and letterpress stages to maximise security against counterfeiting. The Reserve Bank declined to comment on the specific machinery used.

    The next note to be updated will be the $50 bill, which will launch in September 2018.

  • KBA to celebrate 200 Years

    November 29, 1814: The London Times was the first newspaper to be printed on the double-cylinder press designed by Friedrich Koenig and Andreas Bauer.

    In August 2017, Koenig & Bauer AG (KBA) in Würzburg will be celebrating its 200th anniversary. The world’s first press-building workshop of 1817 has since blossomed into a globally successful manufacturing group with a unique portfolio of solutions for the printing industry.

    Anniversary festivities are planned from 21st to 23rd September – an ideal occasion to review past achievements and to present the visions which will determine the company’s strategy and market position in the third century of its history.

    Breakthrough in London

    The times have certainly changed. In the early 19th century, Germany still lacked venturesome investors and a fertile industrial environment. It was not least for this reason that trained printer and untiring inventor Friedrich Koenig travelled to London in 1807 to realise his idea of a steam-driven printing press. While there, he met precision engineer Andreas Bauer, and in November 1814, The Times became the first newspaper to be printed on their double-cylinder press. This laid the foundations for printing on an industrial scale and for access to print media for a much broader section of the population.

    Production in a former monastery

    On 9th August 1817, Friedrich Koenig and Andreas Bauer signed a contract establishing Schnellpressenfabrik Koenig & Bauer in a secularised monastery in Oberzell near Würzburg, and in 1823, the Haude und Spenersche Zeitung in Berlin was the first newspaper on the European continent to be printed on presses from Oberzell.

    Friedrich Koenig died in 1833. His widow Fanny Koenig and his former business partner Andreas Bauer continued his work. New presses were developed and the one-hundredth press was already delivered in 1838. A number of ambitious young workers moved away to found their own businesses. In this sense, Oberzell can be considered the cradle of German printing press manufacture. The company’s foundation period came to an end with the death of Andreas Bauer in 1860.

    Early social achievements

    The founder’s two sons, Wilhelm Koenig and Friedrich Koenig Jr., developed new presses, modernised factory routines and introduced a series of social reforms. The sickness benefit fund founded in 1855 was followed by a factory savings bank in 1865 and by a factory training school, the precursor of today’s vocational training centre in Würzburg, in 1868. The factory statute of 1873 defined the rights and duties of workers and managers and established a factory council with employee participation.

    1876: The era of web printing begins

    The first webfed press was supplied to a newspaper in Magdeburg in 1876. Wilhelm Koenig invented the variable web press in 1886, designed the first four-colour press in 1888, and began building special machines for the printing of luxury products. At the same time, he became very interested in securities printing, a field in which Koenig & Bauer was later to become technology leader. In 1895, the 5000th cylinder press left the factory.

    From 1895 and through into the 1920s, the course of the company was shaped by Constantin Koenig and the founder’s grandson Albrecht Bolza. In 1901, a new factory was built at the site today occupied by the company headquarters. The 225-metre-long production hall was one of the largest in Germany at that time. Webfed publication and rotogravure presses were manufactured, and the development of sheetfed machines was stepped up. Alongside printing presses, various matrix-moulding presses and plate-casting machines were delivered to customers all over the world.

    Destruction and rebuilding

    After the First World War, Dr. Hans Bolza, a great-grandson of Friedrich Koenig, made a notable contribution to the mending of severed foreign business links. He was appointed to the executive board of the company when it was transformed into a limited company in 1920 and served as chairman of the board from 1931 to 1971.

    Koenig & Bauer survived the period of hyperinflation in the 1920s thanks to the newly developed Iris collect press for coloured banknotes. In March 1945, bombs and artillery shells destroyed the Würzburg factories. Reconstruction began in 1946. After the post-war currency reform, Koenig & Bauer resumed business in 1949 with nominal capital amounting to DM 4.1 million.

    1952: Success story of security printing

    Cooperation with securities printing expert Gualtiero Giori began in 1952. A further important milestone was the arrival of a talented young design engineer named Dr. Hans-Bernhard Schünemann, the son of a Bremen publishing family, in 1951. His first of over 250 patents was granted for a modification of the so-called Maltese cross drive mechanism, which was subsequently used in another of his inventions, the sheetfed gravure press Rembrandt MT III. In 1959, Dr. Hans Bolza formally adopted Dr. Schünemann.

    Dr. Bolza-Schünemann was himself president of Koenig & Bauer AG for almost 25 years from 1971 to 1995, and initiated the formation of the KBA Group from 1990. Executive responsibility was subsequently placed in the hands of his close partner and long-serving financial director Reinhart Siewert. After the turn of the century, he was succeeded by Albrecht (2003 – 2009) and Claus Bolza-Schünemann (since 2011), who thus represent the sixth generation of the founding family at the helm of the company.

    Successful presses Condor and Rotafolio

    Despite the growing offset competition in the 1960s and 70s, Koenig & Bauer retained the proven letterpress technology for its sheetfed and webfed presses for a relatively long time. Alongside the Rembrandt sheetfed gravure press and banknote presses developed together with De La Rue Giori, the two-revolution Condor and the Rotafolio sheetfed press for wrap-around plates were extremely successful all over the world.

    High-performance in sheetfed offset since 1974

    The first sheetfed offset press, the half-format Koebau-Rapida 0, was presented at drupa in 1967. The medium-format Koebau-Rapida III followed in 1969. Both ran at speeds up to 8,000 sheets per hour. The Koebau-Rapida SR III launched in 1974 was almost twice as fast at 15,000 sheets per hour. The presses of other major manufacturers did not achieve such performance until much later.

    In 1986, Koenig & Bauer launched the Rapida 104, a unit-type press designed for high flexibility and printing speeds up 15,000 sheets per hour. Production was transferred to the new subsidiary KBA-Planeta AG in 1992, sowing the seed for today’s high-performance sheetfed offset presses from Radebeul. The current Rapida 106, for example, has defined the benchmarks in medium format with speeds up to 20,000 sheets per hour, extremely fast job changeovers and configurations comprising up to 19 printing and finishing units.

    Today’s large-format series Rapida 145 and 164 are the successors to the Rapida 142 and 162 presses which were developed jointly by the Radebeul design engineers and their colleagues from Würzburg in the 1990s. In printshops around the world, these high-performance large-format presses took the place of presses from other manufacturers and paved the way for KBA-Sheetfed’s leading position in large formats. This standing was confirmed yet again in 2003 with the unveiling of the Rapida 205, the world’s largest sheetfed offset press.

    Pioneer of new technologies

    In the same way that the Würzburg engineers ventured new approaches to webfed printing, the Saxon designers have repeatedly struck out on their own in search of simpler and more efficient sheetfed solutions. Two examples are the DI offset press 74 Karat with direct on-press plate imaging, which was developed together with Scitex from Israel in 1997, and its sister press Rapida 74 G from 2000. Both were equipped with short-train inking units for waterless printing. KBA remains strongly committed to this technology, which is especially interesting from the perspectives of print quality and environmental protection.

    When it comes to innovative processes for inline finishing, ecological printing, direct printing on corrugated board or – most recently – LED-UV drying, KBA Sheetfed has regularly acted as a pioneer. The entry into the post-press market in 2016 and the announcement of the digital sheetfed press VariJET 106 at drupa open up further prospects.

    World first in webfed printing

    The era of web offset presses from Würzburg began with the Commander in 1969. Over time, the still dominant satellite design principle was becoming increasingly complex. At the beginning of the 1990s, this trend was answered with the four-high tower presses Journal and Colora. Later, they were joined by the single-width series Comet and Continent. The less expensive four-high tower design appealed to many new international customers, and helped to establish the company as the number one in newspaper printing.

    In this field, too, the Würzburg engineers have never shied the pursuit of new ideas. Already at drupa 1995, for example, visitors could admire an Anilox-Express with automatic plate changing and an imprinter with Scitex inkjet heads in the superstructure. It was shown adding a variable digital caricature to each offset copy. It was then almost 18 years, however, before the inkjet technology was actually used in practice in webfed offset presses.

    At drupa 2000, a new trend towards compact highly automated newspaper presses was heralded by the KBA Cortina, which stood less than 4 metres high. Further features new to newspaper offset were the elimination of dampening units, four-high towers which glided apart for easy access, dedicated drives for each cylinder and the ease of operation with lifts to the upper couples of the tower. The same concept was implemented by the wet offset counterpart Commander CT in 2007. Both presses have remained unique on the market to this day.

    Media upheavals and realignment

    Already in the early 1990s, the World Wide Web was taking its first tentative steps and new digital competitors entered the print arena. Faced with growing online competition, and especially due to the world financial crisis, the market for new webfed offset presses collapsed dramatically in 2008. Koenig & Bauer responded by turning attention to the digital process from 2011, and presented its first inkjet web press, the RotaJET 76, at drupa 2012. Today, with the RotaJET VL series for decor printing and the T1100 S manufactured on behalf of the American HP Corporation for the production of corrugated packaging, the largest digital web presses in the world are produced in Würzburg.

    Early diversification

    The company Koenig & Bauer went public in 1985. The acquisition of Albert-Frankenthal AG and of a majority stake in Planeta Druckmaschinenwerke in the early 1990s established a company group with a turnover of more than DM 1.1 billion. From the turn of the century onwards, the group management started a programme of diversification into market segments less affected by changes in the media landscape.

    The acquisition of Swiss partner De La Rue Giori SA in Lausanne in 2001 secured KBA’s pole position in banknote printing. The purchase of Metronic GmbH in 2004 opened the door to the important market for industrial coding systems. The acquisitions of Bauer + Kunzi and LTG Print Systems, and the subsequent merger into KBA-MetalPrint GmbH in 2006, established KBA as the number one in metal decorating. And with KBA-Kammann GmbH as a global leader for the decoration of glass containers, alongside flexible packaging specialist KBA-Flexotecnica S.p.A, KBA has since 2013 further expanded its portfolio for the diverse packaging segment. A similar purpose was served by the takeover of Spanish die-cutter manufacturer Iberica in 2016.

    This early diversification has helped KBA to master the structural upheavals which have rocked the branch much better than other press manufacturers. At the turn of the century, 60 per cent of the turnover from new press sales was still generated in market segments under pressure from the online media. Today, 90 per cent is accounted for by the growth markets digital and packaging printing and by securities printing.

    Print technologies for every eventuality

    Through market-oriented capacity realignment, the introduction of a new group structure and a clear focus on future-oriented markets, structural changes implemented in 2014 and 2015 have prepared the oldest press manufacturer in the world to meet the challenges of advancing digitisation and globalisation.

    Today, analogue and digital KBA technologies are used to print, finish and process products such as banknotes, metal cans, books, brochures, displays, decor, labels, glass and plastic containers, board and film packaging, catalogues, laminates, magazines, tyres, cables, smart cards, advertising flyers, newspapers and many more besides. Practically all common printing and finishing technologies are involved. This diversity creates unique know-how, and continues to drive innovations, new applications and new partnerships.

     

     

  • True blue: RBA banks on new tenner

    The signature side of the new $10 note, featuring 'Banjo' Paterson.

    The Reserve Bank of Australia has revealed the design of the next generation $10 note, bearing new security features similar to those featured on the $5 note released in September last year.

    Philip Lowe, Reserve Bank Governor.

    The new $10 note, set to be rolled out on September 1, a year after the new $5, will retain many key elements of its previous design including images of the two writers whose faces graced its predecessor. “The $10 banknote celebrates two famous Australian writers, Dame Mary Gilmore and AB ‘Banjo’ Paterson. Their work is recognised in several design elements on the banknote, including images of a pen nib in two of the clear windows and excerpts of their poetry in microprint,” said RBA governor Philip Lowe.

    Each note in the new series will also feature a species of Australian wattle and an Australian bird – in the case of the $10, these are the bramble wattle and the sulphur-crested cockatoo.

    The serial number side of the new $10 note, featuring Dame Mary Gilmore.

    New security features on the updated $10 and all the notes in the new series will include rolling colour patches, a clear strip from top to bottom, and images that fluoresce under ultraviolet light. Tactile features are also included for the vision-impaired community, including two raised bumps near the top of the $10 (as opposed to one on the $5).

    Glenn Stevens, former governor of the Reserve Bank.

    “The new banknotes are the culmination of many years of research and trial and extensive consultation with subject-matter experts and the cash-handling industry, as well as qualitative research involving focus groups,” said former RBA governor Glenn Stevens last year.

    All Australian banknotes are printed by Note Printing Australia (NPA), a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Reserve Bank. The printing process is complex and highly involved, incorporating offset, intaglio and letterpress stages to maximise security against counterfeiting. The Reserve Bank declined to comment on the specific machinery used.

  • The RBA’s cash cow

    The Reserve Bank has confirmed that Australia’s new $5 note contains the same kind of animal fat found in the new British £5 note that has prompted an outcry amongst UK vegetarians and vegans.

    More than 130,000 people signed a petition that has been presented to the Bank of England calling on an immediate end to the practice of using tallow – a waxy white fat that’s made from the kidneys and loins of cows, sheep and horses – in the new polymer notes.

    “This is unacceptable to millions of vegans, vegetarians, Hindus, Sikhs, Jains and others in the U.K.,” the petition says.

    Innovia Films, the company that supplies the polymer plastic used in the £5 notes, also supplies material used in polymer money in 23 other countries, including Australia, New Zealand, Malaysia and Canada.

    “The manufacturer of the polymer material used in Australia’s banknotes (Innovia Films) has confirmed that the material contains minuscule amounts of additives that are derived from tallow,” Ian Chua, Senior Communications Officer, Reserve Bank of Australia, told Print21 via email.

    “I understand these additives assist in the manufacturing process, which is common with many commercially available plastic products. For specific information about the production of the polymer material in question, I’d suggest contacting the manufacturer.”

    Innovia, a British manufacturer of polypropylene and cellulose films for packaging, labelling, graphic arts and industrial products – with offices in the US, Europe and Melbourne – says it only recently become aware of the issue and is  now looking for ways to get rid of the “minute” traces of tallow in its polymer.

    Spokeswoman Patricia Potts says a supplier had used tallow to help make the material more anti-static. Potts said Innovia would never “knowingly add any animal ingredients into our products.”

    Polymer is a flexible substance that is resistant to dirt and lasts longer than paper cash.

     

  • Komori to focus on innovation in 2017

    Komori Graphic Center - The Netherlands

    Best wishes for the new year.

    Komori Corporation will renew its spirit in the pursuit of innovation to drive changes, rather than following them.

    Satoshi Mochida, president Komori

    During 2016, the overall global economy was less than robust, due in part to the deceleration of economic growth in China. Looking at the printing industry, in Japan, printing company profits seem to be improving due to steady trends in the advertising market. In Europe, business sentiment toward capital expenditure has grown warmer thanks to gradual economic recovery. In the United States, although print demand got back on the recovery track, printing companies remained cautious about upgrading their facilities. In China, demand remained sluggish due to the deceleration of economic growth and the deterioration of the financial environment. In India and some ASEAN nations, print demand was firm, fueling demand for printing machinery upgrades, as these markets have been largely unaffected by falling resource prices and currency depreciation.

    Komori’s initiatives in 2016 covered many activities, including participation in international exhibitions, transforming the business structure (expansion of new businesses), and overseas expansion of our security printing press business.

    Above all, held every four years, drupa is the world’s largest printing equipment exhibition. Our demonstration was themed “OPEN NEW PAGES,” with the subtheme of “Connected Print.” In line with these themes, our proposals were centred on integrating printing processes to create new solutions. More specifically, we exhibited in front of a global audience the Impremia IS29 digital printing system and the solution cloud KP-Connect that enables visualization of the printing processes. This provided a prime example of our solutions that enable users to perform value-added services by connecting digital and offset printing presses. We are confident that the demonstration of this and other offerings helped us gain greater recognition among customers worldwide with regard to our PESP business approach. Komori has grown beyond the manufacture of offset printing presses. We are transforming into a provider of comprehensive print engineering service solutions.

    Komori’s security printing machinery business enjoyed orders for security printing machines from Crane Currency, one of the fastest growing banknote printers in the world, the Reserve Bank of India and Perum Percetakan Uang Republik Indonesia.

    To bolster products supporting printing quality and productivity in the PESP business, Komori and Siegwerk have signed a manufacturing and supply agreement for high sensitivity UV ink, a K-Supply product offering high quality and performance, in Europe, the Middle East and Africa (EMEA). From now on, we will supply “K-Supply ink” optimized for Komori’s H-UV system to the market. Fortunately, the reception of orders for H-UV presses will exceed 800 machines at the beginning of 2017.

    Development efforts in collaboration with partners have been under way to create two types of next-generation commercial digital printing presses capable of accommodating needs for small print runs, multiple printed items, short turnarounds, and variable data printing. The Impremia IS29, a 29-inch sheetfed UV inkjet digital printing system developed in partnership with Konica Minolta, was demonstrated at KGC facilities in Japan, the United States and Europe, and subsequently we initiated full-scale marketing of the system in April 2016. We will strive to promote this model utilizing our KGC facilities in Japan and overseas.

    Additionally, the Impremia NS40, a 40-inch Nanographic Printing

    system developed with the Israel-based Landa Corporation, provided customers with innovative solutions and received resounding applause in demonstrations at drupa 2016.

    As the outlook of the global economy gets murkier, there is a growing sense of future uncertainty in the business environment surrounding the Company. In this economic and industrial climate, Komori Corporation will nevertheless push forward with its initiatives aimed at achieving transformation, promoting the PESP business approach, expanding the range of its marketing and securing a corporate structure capable of delivering broader product and service lineups. We will further strengthen cooperation with the printing industry, pursue customer convenience and support improvement of the profit structure of the entire industry. Our management philosophy, realization of customer Kando, remains our goal in the New Year, and Komori will continue to create solutions for mutual growth.

    Komori will make every effort to meet your expectations.

    Satoshi Mochida
    President and Representative Director

     

     

  • drupa preview – what to see at the show

    drupa is the greatest graphic arts show on earth. This time around – Düsseldorf, May 31 to June 10, 2016 – it will again be packed with the latest printing technologies. Here is a growing list of what visitors can look forward to seeing at the show. Check back in to keep up to date with the latest and the greatest.

    Siegwerk looks at inkjet and LED drying. March 14, 2016.
    Next generation DataLase digital printing. March 9, 2016.

    Near instant drying from adphos at drupa. March 6, 2016
    Lüscher rolls out upgrades for drupa March 5, 2016
    Evolving Komori to Open New Page. Feb 2 2016.
    Automate variable data. Lake Systems Feb 2 2016.
    drupa cube partners with The Medici Group Feb 4 2016.

    With the motto “We colour the future”, the global printing ink manufacturer Siegwerk will be demonstrating its products and services portfolio at drupa 2016 to address current and future industry trends. Best-in-class ink performance, high product safety, and excellent services are the company’s main pillars to support their customers and meet their individual needs with cutting-edge solutions.

    Visitors can get in touch with experts of one of the world’s leading ink manufacturers for packaging printing at Booth A58 in Hall 3 and ask for more information about the services and solutions offered. Siegwerk is a leader in ink systems and varnishes, serving different customer segments such as flexible packaging, tobacco, labels, conventional sheetfed, paper and board, and others.

    “As the world’s leading trade show for graphic and industrial print, drupa is an ideal touch point for exchanging information and ideas with our customers,” says Hugo Noordhoek Hegt, President Packaging EMEA at Siegwerk. “We are looking forward to inspiring discussions about new challenges in the market and the expansion of our collaborations.”

    As a member of the German Paint and Printing Ink Association (VdL), Siegwerk will support the association’s “Link to ink – The combined know how” program during drupa with presentations about packaging safety and general ink composition given by Siegwerk experts (more information at Hall 3, Booth 3B16).

    The future looks digital

     Using its expertise in ink technology and its wide application know-how, Siegwerk is today expanding its business into the inkjet ink market – initially, for labels and, secondly for packaging applications too. The company has extended its research and development capabilities and has built a dedicated inkjet laboratory at its Technical Center in Annemasse (France) to drive the development of inkjet inks that meet the requirements for printing process efficiency as well as the functionality of printed materials.

    LED UV technology gains importance

    An increasing number of printers are opting for LED UV technology regardless of the printing process used. With its potential for eco-efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and productivity advantages, it is definitively one technological advance of recent years that will drive future development in the printing industry.

    With Sicura Nutriflex LEDTec, the first low migration LED UV flexo series for food and pharma packaging, Siegwerk is now also addressing the growing demand for low migration products for food packaging applications. Further expansion of applications will enable printers to use LED UV inks for the full range of products. All in all, Siegwerk expects a volume switch from conventional UV to low migration UV inks in the printing market for this year. LED UV curing will be one of the growth drivers.

    Go to top of page

    **********************************

    Leading inline digital printing company, DataLase, will launch the next generation of its revolutionary digital printing solutions at Drupa 2016.

    The new Variprint™ monochrome technology will be demonstrated by the DataLase team on their stand 6A19 in Hall 6 at Drupa, the world’s leading trade show for graphic and industrial print, media and multichannel, held in Dusseldorf, Germany, May 31-June 10, 2016.

    Historically, the technology has only been seen in product coding and marking applications, in white, clear and black. Now, the company has extended its intellectual property portfolio and is bringing to market the ability to deliver true real time messaging and variable data on pack with a new selection of monochrome colours – a breakthrough in laser inline digital printing.

    The Variprint development delivers a new level of pack differentiation with promotions and key variable data messages able to stand out from traditional coding and marking style graphics in blue, green and red text.

    DataLase, which has offices in the UK, USA and Japan, is seeing the development of a range of market applications on a global basis. Its patented laser reactive pigments can be incorporated into a coating, or conventionally printed onto a package. When exposed to a low power CO2 or NIR diode array laser on a packing line, it generates a colour change reaction resulting in a high definition, premium quality digital print.

    The DataLase technology can be applied on a variety of primary and secondary packaging materials, to enable the laser to print text, and graphics up to 100mm high and 2m/sec with one laser. The solution enables high-speed printing, which is ideal for in line customised print. In addition, the system is essentially an inkless print solution removing the requirement for consumables at the point of packing and filling or converter.

    DataLase CEO, Chris Wyres, said: “Our unique technology platforms have been designed to deliver enhanced flexibility, quality, productivity and consumer interaction. Our solutions are a true breakthrough in the market and will change the way brand owners print packaging and interact with consumers.

    “Digital print is growing because it offers a significant advantage over conventional print techniques, delivering capability for responsive and timely customised marketing and promotion on packs and products. Our ground-breaking technology is cost effective and efficient, providing a high added-value solution for today’s print market and meets the needs of brand owners, retailers and packaging converters alike.”

    DataLase technology can be used across the FMCG market place from food and beverage, pharmaceutical and medical, to home and personal care applications. The solution is designed to complement the industry’s most dynamic production lines and is actively used today for folding cartons, cans, bottles, labels, flexible materials, cases and other packaging materials.

    Whilst coding and marking is still a core application for the technology, the future looks bright for DataLase delivering multi-colour highly effective, flexible inline digital printing capability to maximise brand owner and retailer marketing effectiveness.

    Go to top of page

    **********************************

    The adphos Group has developed the next generation of its dryer range that is aimed at boosting performance and quality for digital printing presses.

    The new adphosNIR® technology, to be showcased at drupa 2016, will help to overcome bottleneck limitations that slow productivity, said the company:

    Today, more than ever, known bottleneck limitations are a problem for productivity:

    –       Limited range of substrates
    –       Ink coverage (even less than 270%)
    –       Color density limitations
    –       Reduced productivity and performance – especially for coated and glossy substrates
    –       Waviness (cockle and curl) of printed products
    –       Longer make readies with resulting paper losses
    –       Substrate over drying which may need remoistening or re-saturation
    –       Smearing and offsetting which may require an overcoat

    To answer these limitations, the adphos Group has developed the next generation of our renowned dryer family with adphosNIR® technology to significantly decrease or eliminate the limitations.
    adphosNIR® Technology provides:

    –       Near instantaneous drying
    –       Enhanced print quality (higher resolution, color density, brilliance)
    –       Reduced heating of the substrate
    –       Flatter books and printed materials

    The small footprint of adphosNIR® drying technology allows for easy integration on existing presses, said the company. Contact adphos to learn more or visit the adphos booth C03 in Hall 6 at drupa.

    Go to top of page

    **********************************

    *Swiss manufacturer Lüscher AG Technologies will showcase latest updates to its XPose! Flex line and the MultiDX!Computer to Plate system at this year’s drupa.

    Lüscher, which was taken over by Heliograph Holding in August, also announced plans to redefine its corporate design in line with the new corporate identity.

    At drupa 2016, Lüscher will show a new model of its XPose! product line: XPose! FlexLine 330L for 42×60 inch formats. The imagesetter combines a dual optic with 5080/2540 dpi with a unique patented inside drum system.

    Also on show will be a further development of the MultiDX! 220: the MultiDX! 320, the all-in-one Computer to Plate system. The new 320 line is equipped with a dynamic autofocus and can be equipped with up to 128 laser diodes to allow processing of larger screen frames. With this system, almost any printing forms such as rotary screens, letterpress, flexo and offset printing plates, flat screens and aluminium and copper plates can be exposed.

    In hall 16 at booth no. C07, a qualified Lüscher team will be ready to give expert advice to any interested customer or distributor.

    After the takeover of 100% of the Lüscher shares by Heliograph Holding last August, the management of Lüscher has decided to redefine its design by bringing it in line with the corporate identity. The new corporate design will be launched on May 1, 2016. Lüscher manufactures all equipment at its headquarters in Bleienbach, Switzerland. With more than 2400 installations in 60 different countries, Lüscher is a leading global manufacturer of computer-to-plate applications, and also specialises in security printing such as banknotes or security documents such as passports or ID cards demanding high resolutions of up to 12,000dpi.
    Go to top of page

    **********************************

    Japanese offset press manufacturer Komori will highlight its new platform of print engineering services at drupa 2016 in Dusseldorf, Germany.

    “Komori is evolving from a specialist printing press manufacturer to a print engineering service provider (PESP),” said Yosuke Fujimaki, manager of Komori’s Solution Business Promotion Department. “We will expand the new potential of printing by offering offset presses, digital printing systems, printed electronics, materials and equipment.”

    The company’s theme of Open New Pages aimed to offer new business opportunities to its customers, he said.

    “Komori will evolve in innovative ways by aiming for ‘connected print. We will create new value and richer communications by not only connecting our customers’ various processes but also by connecting our customers to Komori’s diverse functions using the latest technologies, such as the cloud.”

    Komori will exhibit a lineup of hardware at drupa 2016 that includes offset presses, digital printing systems and postpress equipment, along with software products for the integrated control of these systems and K-Supply products that support quality and productivity.

    “Through the technologies and solutions presented in the Komori booth, we will show our commitment to becoming the business partner of customers that is capable of improving their margins and increasing their productivity,” Fujimaki said.

    Komori Corporation will exhibit under the theme ‘Open New Pages’ at drupa from Tuesday, May 31 to Friday, June 10, 2016 at Düsseldorf Fairgrounds.  The Komori booth will be at HALL 15, D04.

    Go to top of page

     

    **********************************
    Automate variable data integrity and print quality inspection. Lake Image Systems
    Lake Image Systems, a leader in variable data integrity and print quality inspection for the packaging, labels, and commercial print industries, is pleased to announce that they will be exhibiting at the drupa 2016 trade fair on stand #11B42.

    The company is presenting a full suite of integrated, tailored solutions to help customers in all segments of the graphic communications market, to produce error-free printing, automate inspection requirements and reduce waste to drive profitable growth.

    Contact Image Sensor

    Lake Image Systems will feature its latest portfolio of powerful solutions for Document producers, Label printers and Packaging converters to automate variable data integrity and print quality inspection requirements. Four industry applications zones will be demonstrated at the show. These include:

    Zone 1: Digital Packaging: With variable data, digitally printed on packaging is on the increase, Lake Image will be showcasing its latest range of solutions for reading, grading and verifying barcodes, QRcodes and text elements as well as for detecting print defects such as streaks, hickies & voids and print registration issues for a variety of flexible packaging applications

    Zone 2: Variable Data Labels & Security Printing: Variable data and barcodes on labels such as tax stamps, pharmaceutical and authentication labels are now critical for many anti-counterfeit and traceability applications such as track and trace systems. Similarly, many security documents and paper have unique identifiers which need to be tracked and verified to prevent criminal activity and ensure process integrity during complex, multi-step production processes. Lake Image will demo its industry winning Discovery MaxScan solution for inspecting, reading, tracking and verifying variable codes on a variety of challenging substrates including highly reflective tax stamps for out of sequence, missing or duplicate labels as well as for positional and print defects issues. The Lake Image Discovery software tools provide 100% quality inspection and print data integrity for all label presses and applicators at speeds exceeding 300 metres per minute.

    Zone 3: Transactional and Direct Mail: The full Discovery platform will be demonstrated, including a comprehensive range of verification, inspection and integrity software tools to ensure mission critical documents and mailings are always 100% correct. Sequence check, data matching and presence/absence software tools provide variable data verification from page to page printing including duplex operations. Inspection tools detect print defects such as print registration, colour deviation and print quality. Integrity tools such as Batch Control, File Audit and File Look-Up, verify that each and every printed page is produced with the highest levels of integrity compared to the original customer data job files. Discovery tools can be invoked conditionally by detecting triggers in the data, an image or a code printed on the document. Combining multiple tools enables complex inspection tasks to be performed when required and is saved with the specific job.

    Zone 4: Loyalty, Gaming & Plastic Cards: A variety of inspection solutions will be on display including card number verification, missing/duplicate card detection, scratch off verification, pin number legibility, pin & account number reporting, sorting/batching and database integrity reporting. Other requirements such as card/carrier matching & magnetic stripe reading are also available.

    “drupa is an important event for us, and offers the perfect stage to present our full portfolio of solutions for improving print quality, variable data integrity and waste reduction, and illustrates our commitment to working with our customers to grow their businesses” commented Martin Keats, Managing Director at Lake Image Systems Ltd. “We will be demonstrating our broadest array of industry targeted solutions ever which effectively addresses all the inspection needs for today’s blended conventional and digital production environments, Our application and technology experts will be on the stand throughout the show to ensure visitors get all the information they need.”

    Go to top of page

     

    **********************************
    The primary partner for the delivery of content this year at drupa cube is Johansson’s international innovation firm The Medici Group. Founder and CEO Johansson wrote the 2004 book The Medici Effect and since then has been a go-to expert for concepts of thinking and acting outside fixed limits, or the ‘out-of-the-box’ principle.

    “Global brands such as American Express, IBM, Nike, Volvo and The Walt Disney Company have already been drawing on the strategic expertise of The Medici Group and now drupa is doing the same,” said Sabine Geldermann, director at drupa. “With The Medici Group, we have precisely the right partner at our side for drupa cube. A consistent approach to change management is absolutely necessary to master the challenges in the print, packaging and media sectors.”

    In his opening keynote on 31st May, Johansson will talk on the drupa theme Touch the Future and ‘Intersectional Thinking’. A core question that will be addressed is, What happens when technological revolutions meet an industry that has been around for a millennium? Other speakers will include Silas Amos ‎(Founder of Silas Amos Ltd. Design Thought), a designer and strategic partner for several firms in the FMCG industry, and Shane Wall, Chief Technology Officer at HP and Global Head of HP Labs.

    There will also be a mix of the following sessions across the eleven days:

    Business Evolution: Twelve 30-minute slots are aimed primarily at decision-makers in the printing industry who are focusing on increasing efficiency and profits within their companies. Accordingly, both “best practices” and business models, as well as investment strategies and human resources management will be discussed. Already on the list of speakers are: Ronan Zioni/HP, Neil Falconer/Print Future, Ulbe Jelluma/Print Power and Chris Bondy/RIT’s School of Media Sciences.

    Technology: Eleven 30-minute slots will focus on technological innovations and their new areas of application. How can these innovations be integrated into existing workflows and what will be the consequences? These and other topics are aimed at decision-makers and management at printing firms, and will also appeal to all other drupa visitors who have an interest in technology. One special event of note is the three one-hour “Gladiator Sessions” comparing two converging technologies where the pros and cons are discussed with a moderator. The following speakers have already committed to participate: Chris Bondy (RIT’s School of Media Sciences /USA), Joanna Stephenson (DataLase/UK) and Lilach Sapir (Massivit 3D printing/Israel).

    Intersectional: These six sessions, led by The Medici Group, will focus on “Innovation @ the Intersection” and will encompass the six highlight topics of drupa 2016 (multichannel, print, functional printing, 3D-Printing, packaging production and green printing). In each interactive lecture slot, several of these highlight topics will be combined with one another using specific application examples, such as functional printing & packaging print, 3D printing & sustainability or multichannel & print.

    C-Level: The four invitation-only slots in this programme segment are aimed at a fixed, defined subscriber group at management level as well as at exhibitors and visitors. These C-level sessions will directly follow the four keynotes and are formatted as interactive workshops where strategic insider knowledge is conveyed. The keynote speaker whose talk precedes each session will act as the moderator.

    The strategic and creative design of the programme and on-site implementation have been entrusted to London-based brand experience agency FreemanXP. “Just as Gutenberg revolutionised communications by converging the spoken word with print, we are seeing new crossroads that are spawning unimaginable results in every sector. Be it personalisation of printed products, ‘fabbing’ or even human organ printing, drupa is a showcase for how we ‘Touch the Future’ of print. With The Medici Group, drupa Innovation Partner 2016, we have evolved the drupa cube experience to encourage conversation and convergent thinking that will lead to the co-creation, re-imagination and re-invention of the future of printing,” added Jordan Waid, Vice President Brand Experience, FreemanXP EMEA.

    A provisional programme will be online from February; the complete programme is scheduled to be online in March. An extra special feature: participation in the cube programme is free of charge for drupa visitors, included in the daily ticket price of € 65 (or € 45 for the online ticket).

    More information here.

    Go to top of page

  • Lüscher rolls out upgrades for drupa

    Lüscher's XPose! FlexLine

    Swiss manufacturer Lüscher AG Technologies will showcase latest updates to its XPose! Flex line and the MultiDX! Computer to Plate system at this year’s drupa.

    Lüscher, which was taken over by Heliograph Holding in August, also announced plans to redefine its corporate design in line with the new corporate identity.

    At drupa 2016, Lüscher will show a new model of its XPose! product line: XPose! FlexLine 330L for 42×60 inch formats. The imagesetter combines a dual optic with 5080/2540 dpi with a unique patented inside drum system.

    Also on show will be a further development of the MultiDX! 220: the MultiDX! 320, the all-in-one Computer to Plate system. The new 320 line is equipped with a dynamic autofocus and can be equipped with up to 128 laser diodes to allow processing of larger screen frames. With this system, almost any printing forms such as rotary screens, letterpress, flexo and offset printing plates, flat screens and aluminium and copper plates can be exposed.

    In hall 16 at booth no. C07, a qualified Lüscher team will be ready to give expert advice to any interested customer or distributor.

    After the takeover of 100% of the Lüscher shares by Heliograph Holding last August, the management of Lüscher has decided to redefine its design by bringing it in line with the corporate identity. The new corporate design will be launched on May 1, 2016. Lüscher manufactures all equipment at its headquarters in Bleienbach, Switzerland. With more than 2400 installations in 60 different countries, Lüscher is a leading global manufacturer of computer-to-plate applications, and also specialises in security printing such as banknotes or security documents such as passports or ID cards demanding high resolutions of up to 12,000dpi.

    Lüscher's MultiDX! 220

     

  • Security tightened at RBA’s banknote printer

    The Reserve Bank has been forced to change the locks and repair security cameras at its printing plant in Melbourne after an employee responsible for burning damaged banknotes instead pocketed almost $1 million.

    'We fixed the problem': RBA governor Glenn Stevens

    RBA governor Glenn Stevens revealed the security measures at a federal committee hearing after questions from Labor MP Ed Husic, who had complained about a lack of transparency in the RBA’s response to the crime.

    “Does the RBA accept that it should be a bit more up-front about the way that it is dealing with something that I think a lot of people would have genuine concerns about?” Husic asked, according to a report in The Australian Financial Review. 

    Stevens replied: “The failures that allowed the person concerned to do what he did were serious failures of procedure and security. The security, had it been implemented properly, would have prevented it but there were serious lapses in its implementation.”

    Wayne Kevin Jackson, a scientist responsible for incinerating damaged bank notes at Note Printing Australia, the bank’s note-printing facility in Craigieburn, north of Melbourne, handed himself into police in August last year after an investigation by Australian Federal Police. Jackson pleaded guilty to taking almost $1 million in currency.  Police allege the middle-aged man bought a $125,000 Mercedes, a silver Rolex, five gold nuggets and enjoyed trips to Europe.

    Police discovered that a CCTV camera above a furnace at the Craigieburn facility was not active when the crimes were allegedly committed between May 2010 and May 2012.

    “All the security, in terms of multiple locks, triple control, the video camera in operation – all those things that were at fault at the time, which opened the loophole or the weakness for that individual to do what he did – those things have been fixed,” said Stevens. “I think we have handled it properly. We fixed the problem.”

  • A world of paper, a sea of red ink – Andy McCourt

    “If all the world were paper,
    And all the sea were ink,
    And all the trees were bread and cheese,
    What should we have to drink?”

    So goes the old nursery rhyme. However, today’s paper industry is far from child’s play; it is increasingly littered with failed businesses, the latest being PaperlinX in Europe and one of the oldest UK mills, Tullis Russell of Fife, Scotland; established in 1809. Fife has already seen one of its two paper mills depart, when SAPPI closed its operation in 2001. It is no secret that a good water supply is needed to make paper – it also happens to be essential to another of Scotland’s industries; Whisky. Fife used to be home to Haig’s whisky distillery, but that’s gone elsewhere too.

    Another smaller but older UK paper mill, Portals of Laverstoke Mill at Whitchurch, Hampshire is now the distillery for Bombay Sapphire Gin. Portals had exclusively supplied the rag paper for Bank of England banknotes since 1724. Such was the uniqueness of this security paper, that when the Nazis (using forced Jewish skilled labour), tried to flood Britain with forged banknotes towards the end of WWII to undermine the economy; they couldn’t quite get the paper right despite using experts from what we now know as the Hahnemuele (est.1584) fine art and inkjet paper mill!

    Closer to home, in February we saw the closure, after a courageous fight, of Australian Paper’s Shoalhaven mill in NSW

    All over the world there are mill closures or curtailments. In the USA alone between 1990 and 2013, over 1,700 pulp, paper and saw- mills closed, were demolished or were curtailed, with job losses in the region of 108,600.

    In Europe between 2010 and 2015 an estimated capacity of between 2.7 million and 3.5 million tonnes of paper production was taken out.  Much of the decline is in graphic papers but tissues and packaging papers and boards are faring better in places like Finland.

    As to be expected, the picture is different in China, with continued investment in huge new pulp and paper mills; fueled by fibre from hardwood Eucalypt trees cultivated to reach harvestable height within 6 years; plus wood from questionable sources in Russia, Indonesia and Vietnam. China also imports about 30 million tonnes annually of used paper and cardboard for de-inking and recycling. In 2009, China overtook the USA as the world’s largest paper producer in tonnage terms.

    One of world’s largest paper mills is Guangxi Jingui Pulp & Paper Co Ltd which, with a 1.2-million-tonnes rated capacity is but one of half a dozen Chinese super-mills. However, the records tumbled in 2013 when stage one of the Metso-built Eldorado Brasil’s Mato Grosso mill shipped 1.4 million tonnes of paper. Plans are afoot to triple production up to 5 million tonnes p.a. Eucalypts are again the main feedstock due to their ability to grow fast in tropical conditions.

    Mills producing 30,000, 50,000 or even 120,000 tonnes (as in the case of Tullis Russell) of paper a year can not compete with the economies of scale of these new super-mills. World paper production is estimated to be about 405 million tonnes in 2014 and already Asia is responsible for 45% of this figure (source: Pulp & Paper International).

    Add to this massive government subsidies ($35 billion for pulp and paper in China between 2005 and 2010), low labour and feedstock costs and the parlous position of Australian and Western papermaking in general is brought into clear focus, as they battle rising raw material costs, higher labour costs and outdated production methods.

    However, it is not all bad news for the printing industry. Many of the materials being printed today, especially on wide-format digital devices, are non-paper in origin. Textiles, plastics, ceramics and metals are finding their way into printshops for imaging on. Even paper-based substrates depend more on the coatings than the base layer.

    Also, as the trajectory of A3+ and now B2 and reel digital papers continues its inexorable upward path, paper suppliers, including the digital press vendors, and printers can both make better profits.

    For offset printers, the challenges are greater but even here, once China reaches capacity to feed its own printing industry, the hope is that cheaper paper from the land that invented it (in 105AD), will alleviate some of the pressure.