Posts Tagged ‘Healey’

  • Do you know the new How-to-Vote card requirements?

    The Printing Industries Association of Australia (Printing Industries) is warning Australian printers taking on federal election-related jobs to make sure they remind their clients of a change in How-to-Vote card requirements.

    Printing Industries believes that many Federal Election candidates may have been ‘caught on the hop’ by Amendments to the Commonwealth Electoral Act that could seem them having to reprint How-to-Vote cards.

    The amendments require authorisation details to be included at the top or bottom of ‘each printed face’ on How-to-Vote cards, which was previously not the case.

    Printing Industries CEO Bill Healey (pictured) said that the 2010 Amendment to the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 were passed by the same politicians who may now be faced with having to re-do their How-to-Vote cards.

    “With the pressure of preparing their election material for the 2013 Federal Election, it appears from the feedback I have received from our members that some politicians are unaware of the requirement in spite of being involved in the passing of the legislation.

    “This election will be the first where the Amendment has been enacted since being passed in 2010,” he said.

    Healey said that the onus to comply with the Electoral Act, including the amendments, rested with candidates.

    “However I have already informed our members who may be asked to print How-to-Vote cards to ensure that they remind their clients of this new obligation,” he said. “I think it is likely that there may be some disruption to the preparation of cards by some candidates.”

    Healey said he had spoken to the Chief Legal Officer of the Australian Electoral Commission to confirm the issue. The Amendment states:

    328B          Requirements relating to how-to-vote cards

    Authorisation details must be included on how-to-vote card 

(1) The following information (the authorisation details) must be included at the top or bottom of each printed face of a how-to-vote
card:

    (a) the name and address of the person who authorised the how-to-vote card;
(b) the following information (to the extent that it is not already required by paragraph (a)):

    (i) if the card is authorised by or on behalf of a registered political party, or by or on behalf of a candidate who is endorsed by a registered political party—the name of the registered political party;
(ii) if the card is authorised by or on behalf of a candidate who is not endorsed by a registered political party — the candidate’s name, and the word “candidate”.

    Mr Healey said the Chief Legal Officer had suggested that Printing Industries also provide the industry with the definition of what a How-to Vote card is.

    A HowtoVote card means a card, handbill or pamphlet:

    (a)  that:

    (i)  is, or includes, a representation of a ballot paper or part of a ballot paper for an election (or something apparently intended to represent a ballot paper or part of a ballot paper for an election); and

    (ii)  is apparently intended to affect, or is likely to affect, how votes are cast for any or all of the candidates in the election; or

    (b)  that lists the names of 2 or more of the candidates or registered political parties in an election, with a number indicating the order of voting preference in conjunction with the names of 2 or more of the candidates or parties; or

    (c)  that otherwise directs or encourages the casting of votes in an election in a particular way, other than a card, handbill or pamphlet:

    (i)  that only relates to first preference votes; or

    (ii)  that only relates to last preference votes.

    Mr Healey said a copy of the Act including the 2010 and 2013 amendments which removed the font size requirements can be downloaded here.

  • The search for Australia’s future print leaders is on again nationwide

    The search for outstanding young employee nominations for the 2013 Future Leaders Award is on again across Australia.

    Sponsored by Media Super, the award is being run in conjunction with the Printing Industries Craftsmanship Awards (PICA).

    Bill Healey (pictured), CEO of the Printing Industries Association of Australia (Printing Industries), said that 2013 would be the first time all states had been able to include it as a part of their PICA events.

    Right across Australia – Bill Healey, Printing Industries CEO.

    “The inaugural awards were launched in NSW, Victoria and Tasmania last year and from this year it is a part of all our state PICAs making the Future Leaders Award a truly national and highly competitive event,” he said. “Printing Industries is deeply involved in encouraging young people to further their careers in our industry, at all levels from apprentices to managers. They are a key part of our industry’s future development.

    “High levels of talent and commitment need to be encouraged and nurtured.  The Media Super Future Leaders Award demonstrates that, as an industry, we are serious about promoting achievement and excellence to help develop the industry leaders of tomorrow,” he said.

    Healey commended Media Super for its continuing support of the awards at both state and national levels. Media Super National Client Relationship Manager, Lisa Collins, said that Media Super was proud to continue its support of Future Leaders Award and to build on a successful print industry partnership.

    “This award was created to recognise and reward exceptional & creative young people employed in any sector of the industry, from print to packaging, graphics and design,” she said. “While new forms of media are topical, print remains a fundamental, environmentally friendly, creative and highly effective part of the communications mix with opportunities at every level.”

    Nominations should be submitted to Printing Industries state office before the PICA awards entry closing date for that state. An Entry form and criteria can be downloaded here.

    The National winner will receive an all-expense paid trip to the 2014 National Print Awards plus $2000 for their superannuation account.

  • “Small printing industry businesses are too big to ignore” – PIAA

    The Printing Industries Association of Australia (Printing Industries) has joined the campaign to unite the many voices of small business around Australia and help change the attitudes and actions of politicians and governments by showing them that, together, small business is too big to ignore.   

    The Small Business. Too Big to Ignore campaign welcomed the many thousands of small businesses in Australia’s print, packaging, communication and information sectors.

    Bill Healey, Printing Industries CEO. 

    At the heart of the campaign is a genuine grass roots movement, driven by social media and an innovative online social media hub that dynamically brings together posts and images at http://toobigtoignore.org.au.

    Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (ACCI) Chief Executive Peter Anderson said: “The print, packaging, communication and information sectors are part of a rapidly evolving industry, with many small businesses needing as much relief as possible from red tape and heavy handed government.

    “Small business has drawn a line in the sand with this campaign and is sending a message loud and clear to Canberra that small business is too big to ignore,” he said.

    Printing Industries CEO Bill Healey (pictured) said: “The vast majority of our members are small businesses and they share the broader concerns of small business about being overtaxed, over-regulated and overlooked by government.

    “Small printing industry businesses are too big to ignore, so we are joining the campaign to make a big noise for small business in Canberra” he said.

  • No joy for printers in Federal budget – PIAA

    Treasurer Wayne Swan’s sixth budget to the nation looks unlikely to benefit printers, according to the Printing Industries Association of Australia (Printing Industries), following budget night on 14 May.

    The association says that there are simply no measures such as corporate tax cuts, personal income tax cuts or measures to significantly boost economic activity or measures aimed at reducing regulations and compliance costs faced by small to medium sized printing businesses.

    In a statement, Printing Industries said:there is not much joy for the printing and associated industries in the Treasurer’s sixth budget.”

    Printing Industries says the budget has confirmed more cost pressures for business generally but specifically for small to medium sized businesses are just weeks away with increases in the compulsory superannuation to 9.25 per cent from 1 July 2013.

    According to Hagop Tchamkertenian (pictured), Printing Industries’ national manager, Policy and Government Affairs, the anticipated slowdown in economic growth during the next financial year will not provide much comfort to printing businesses facing challenging economic conditions, as printing businesses generally benefit from increased rates of economic activity.

    Consumption expenditure, a key driver of activity for the printing industry, is forecast to remain modest over the forward years.

    Printing businesses look set to benefit from lower projected inflation and moderate wage increases. A slight projected rise in the unemployment rate should help those printing businesses facing labour shortages by increasing the pool of labour resources available for hire.

    Printing Industries is also encouraging members to support the Small Business – Too Big to Ignore campaign this week, to give small business a greater voice in the agendas of political parties.

    The campaign was created by the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (ACCI) of which Printing Industries is a member.

    Printing Industries CEO Bill Healey (pictured) said the campaign was developed to give small business a collective voice that previously had not been possible.

    “Since the vast majority of our membership falls into this category, the campaign is well suited to complement our own strategies over the next few months,” he said. “While our members have many industry-specific concerns related to how they navigate the future in a multi-channel, digital world, they also share the broader concerns of business about being overtaxed, over-regulated and overlooked by government.

    “There are some two million small businesses in Australia employing more than seven million people – 60 per cent of Australia’s workforce – and that’s a force that collectively we want to be part of making a big noise to be heard in Canberra by all politicians from all political parties,” he said.

    Healey said the Too Big to Ignore campaign had a website where companies could voice their support simply by showing their support through visiting it, sharing it with others, making a comment, uploading a supporting video and her options.

    “I encourage everyone to visitwww.toobigtoignore.org.auand to show their support and make themselves heard,” he said.

    Click here to read Printing Industries’ full report on the Federal budget.

  • PIAA supports pre-election small business campaign

    Printing Industries Association of Australia (Printing Industries) has thrown its support behind the Small Business – Too Big to Ignore campaign to give small business a greater voice in the agendas of political parties.

    The campaign was launched by the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (ACCI) of which Printing Industries is a member.

    Printing Industries met with ACCI to discuss how the campaign could complement the association’s own lobbying efforts in the lead-up to the September federal election.

    Bill Healey (pictured), Printing Industries CEO, said the campaign was being developed to give small business a collective voice that previously had not been possible.

    “Since the vast majority of our membership falls into this category, the campaign is well suited to complement our own strategies over the next few months,” he said. “While our members have many industry-specific concerns related to how they navigate the future in a multi-channel, digital world, they also share the broader concerns of business about being overtaxed, over-regulated and overlooked by government.

    “There are some two million small businesses in Australia employing more than seven million people – 60 per cent of Australia’s workforce – and that’s a force that collectively we want to be part of making a big noise to be heard in Canberra by all politicians from all political parties,” he said.

    Healey also said the Too Big to Ignore campaign has a website where companies can voice their support simply through visiting it, sharing it with others, making a comment, and uploading a supporting video.

    “I encourage everyone to visit www.toobigtoignore.org.au and to show their support and make themselves heard,” he said.

  • Healey backs Holmesglen TAFE training plan

    Industry chief describes the proposed Victorian TAFE school, now identified as Melbourne’s Holmesglen,  as the most economically responsible way to deliver institutional training for printing apprentices.

    Bill Healey, CEO of Printing Industries, gave his backing ahead of a pivotal meeting between the college, the Industry Action Group and himself on Monday.  The meeting was to decide the fate of the proposal to establish a new facility to train apprentices away from their job locations. Other proposals from the Victorian Government would have involved Printing Industries investing millions in establishing stand-alone training sites.

    Holmesglen Chadstone Campus

    “My concern has always been to ensure the Association is protected from major costs in providing off site training. The Holmesglen proposal meets the needs of those in the industry that want a central training site without exposing the industry to excessive costs,” he said.

    The TAFE proposal is one of a number of industry training initiatives being progressed by Printing Industries. The development of its own RTO (registered training organisation) will see it compete with other industry players for on-the-job training throughout Australia.

    “We’re also close to finalising a million dollar Government scheme to reinvigorate apprenticeship training. This will have far-reaching effects on the industry as a whole,” he said.

    He said the industry needs to move with the times and that the Association is committed to playing a leading role in the provision of training across the country.

    Roy Aldrich, a member of the Industry Action Committee and a firm advocate for the establishment of a central training facility,was confident the Monday meeting will confirm the new apprentice training scheme. He said the agreement was secure and will usher in a new era in printing apprenticeship training across Victoria and Tasmania, and possibly throughout the nation.

    “We need this style of training to equip our young apprentices with all the skills they’ll need in the future. Everyone I’ve spoken with in the industry wants this to happen,” he said.

    No news on the outcome of the meeting was available at time of going to press.

     

  • PIAA gets government backing for key courses

    Printing Industries is calling for Expressions of Interest from New South Wales and Victorian companies in a series of business productivity courses that the Federal Government has agreed to subsidise.

    Printing companies have the option of their staff members undertaking any or all of the three courses being offered which are geared towards improving company competitiveness in a robust business environment.

    The courses are:

    The Challenge of Leadership (Certificate IV in Frontline Management)

    This course aims to develop the highly effective leadership abilities required for continuous improvement, project management, change- management, innovation and building high performance teams including:

    • Developing and implementing a 6 – 8 month workplace project
    • Accepting the challenge of a high performance environment
    • Overcoming resistance as a leader of change and innovation
    • Developing a commitment to continuous improvement
    • Creating high performance teams
    • Developing employee potential in a learning environment
    • Delegation, decision-making and problem solving.

    The Sales Edge (Certificate IV in Business Sales)

    Based on the premise that: “Nothing happens until something gets sold,” this course is geared for sales teams to grow revenue through learning how to achieve:

    • New clients
    • Better client retention
    • More profitable relationships with existing clients
    • Increased market share.

    The third course, Promoting Innovation, is customised to reflect the specific needs of enterprises and is framed to develop an innovative mindset in the training participant. It includes two face-to-face training days supported by on-the-job project work and coaching.

    At the end of the program participants will have developed skills, tools and behaviours that can be applied to day to day work to deliver innovative solutions to opportunities and problems, which might include new products, processes, services and practices.

    Participants will receive a formal Skills Set Certification from a Registered Training Organisation.

    Printing Industries CEO Bill Healey says that one of the major challenges facing printing companies was in identifying their future skill sets.

    “The surety of the ‘trades’ to meet your production requirements is diminishing as new ‘non-traditional’ technology becomes available and engaged in the printing business of today and tomorrow,” he says. “Numerous studies have shown that the best managed companies achieve high scores for performance in areas such as sales per employee, rate of revenue and market share growth. Training of employees has significant and positive benefits to businesses operating in a highly competitive market.

    “There is little doubt that in today’s highly competitive environment, productivity gains must be sought at all points across the marketing and sales value chain for small, medium, and large sized companies,” he says.

    According to Healey, Printing Industries is partnering with Innovation and Business Skills Australia (IBSA), Federal Government and in NSW Junior Printing Executives (JPE) to bring these crucial skills into the reach of all printing companies.

    “Subject to industry demand, we hope to bring these courses to Sydney and Melbourne and to regional areas in both states,” he says. “Training will begin in February 2013 and in most instances will run for about 10 months. Costs will be minimal since these courses will be substantially subsidised and Printing Industries will assist with the necessary paperwork making this a very attractive proposition for all businesses.”

    To register your interest, contact:

    Neal McLary nmclary@printnet.com.au; Mobile:0418738231

  • PIAA pushes for talks with VIC government over RMIT

    Printing Industries is pushing for an urgent meeting with the Victorian Minister for Higher Education and Skills, Peter Hall, on his return to Melbourne next week, calling on the government to implement its commitment to finding an acceptable solution to the industry training crisis.

    Printing Industries CEO, Bill Healey (pictured), says that RMIT University’s move to sell its print training courses to private trainer, CLB, was undertaken too hastily, without consideration for the industry, and he is concerned for the quality of training in Victoria and Tasmania as a result of the sale.

    “Victorian and Tasmanian companies are outraged at the decision by RMIT to exit printing apprenticeship training and sell its assets to a private training provider without first consulting the industry,” says Healey.

    “We believe RMIT acted with undue haste. We are disappointed that they chose not to work with the industry to identify a solution recognising the time and investment that had been made by industry stakeholders in the operations of the International Centre of Graphic Technology (ICGT) over many years.

    “But our biggest concern is the question mark that now hangs over the future of quality training for apprentices in Victoria and Tasmania,” he says.

    Healey, however, acknowledges that some changes may be required to the existing training model to ensure that the printing industry would have access to a skilled workforce for its immediate and future need, but he remains concerned that fully on–the-job training as advocated under the CLB deal will provide a narrow set of skills.

    “We need to look at ways of ensuring apprentices have an opportunity to mix with peers outside their workplace and have access to the broad range of equipment that will enable them to become well rounded trades people,” he says. “That’s why it’s essential that the industry is involved in managing its training agenda to meet its needs for its future and why so many people are feeling totally let down by RMIT.”

    According to Healey, Printing Industries had consulted with CLB but to date had not had a response from the Vice Chancellor of RMIT.

    “At the top of our agenda with the Minister along with our assertion that an industry controlled Registered Training Organisation (RTO) similar to successful operating overseas models will be necessary to provide access to quality training for all companies,” says Healey.

    Printing Industries has already started implementing the $1.4 million Federal Government funded Printing Industry Apprenticeship Advisory and Mentoring Program to support apprentices, increase their retention rates of current apprentices and encourage new entrants.

    “We also have an application pending for a grant under the Accelerated Apprenticeship program to look at ways of making apprenticeships more responsive to our changing workplace,” says Healey. “We see training as vital to the development of the printing industry and hope that our vision is shared by the Victorian Government and all other stakeholders.”