Posts Tagged ‘Trade shows’

  • Screen’s ‘Digital Everywhere’ for IGAS

    The Truepress Jet520HD high-speed inkjet press will be the star of Screen’s ‘Digital Everywhere’ stand at the big IGAS trade fair in Tokyo later this month.

    ‘It’s well worth the visit’: Peter Scott, MD Screen GP Australia.

    “We look forward to warmly welcoming all IGAS visitors from Australia and New Zealand,” says Screen GP Australia MD Peter Scott. “Although the theme is ‘Digital Everywhere,’ Screen will also show latest developments in CtP and other products not yet available in our market. The venue is stunning and, of course, Tokyo night life after work is legendary. It’s well worth the visit.”

    Working examples illustrating the possibilities available with a digital printing business will be on show, including many items not possible with standard offset or flexo/gravure label printing, including mixed and small lot on-demand books, variable direct mail, security tickets, food packaging labels and shrink-wrap labels for beverages.

    At the core of the stand will be the EQUIOS workflow solution platform, which drives the range of Truepress Jet digital presses and can also interface with offset CtP for longer runs and mixed offset/digital production.

    The star of the show will be Screen’s Truepress Jet520HD high-speed inkjet press, running SC wide-gamut inks that enable digital printing onto standard offset coated stocks.

    The excellence of the 520HD + SC ink combination led to them receiving twin prizes in the US and Japan: a 2017 InterTech Technology Award from Printing Industries of America (PIA) and a 2018 technology award from the Japanese Society of Printing Science and Technology (JSPST). Newly improved drying functions have further increased print speeds to 75 meters per minute even on offset coated papers.

    Attendees will have the opportunity to see a production solution built around EQUIOS that is linked from its front end, through to digital print and on to a cut and stack system provided by post-processing experts Tecnau.

    The exhibit will also include the debut of EQUIOS Online Version 5, the latest edition of the platform’s Web portal system.

    The Truepress Jet L350UV+LM will make its Asia-Pacific regional debut at IGAS. The high-end digital label press enables a significantly expanded range of applications including food packaging labels and shrink-wrap labels for beverages.

    A laser die cutting machine from Cartes will also be on display as a post-processing solution. Technologies newly developed by Cartes are highly effective for overcoming the issue of white edges generated during die cutting. The system’s capabilities will be introduced in a demonstration of high-speed cutting using variable data.

    Screen’s IGAS stand can be found in East Hall 2, No. 2-1, at the Tokyo Big Site from July 26th to 31st.

  • IPEX is gone – iconic UK trade show pulls the plug

    IPEX London 2014.

    Bowing to the inevitable the organisers of IPEX have called it quits following two disastrous trade shows, one in London where it broke tradition by moving to the capital, the second a vain attempt to return to its spiritual home in Birmingham.

    According to Rob Fisher, the exhibition’s event director, the organisers blamed changing market conditions rather than accept any blame. “The changing market conditions and appetite for a large-scale event which focuses on Print in Action continues to be challenging. Having engaged with a range of exhibitors and partners to evaluate the options for IPEX, we have concluded that the requirements of the industry no longer match our own in terms of the cycle, scale and what is required to help us further support and fully invest in the brand.

    “Through IPEX, we’re proud to have played a role in an important and diverse industry, and to have supported a brand that has such a long history. We enjoyed organising and delivering IPEX 2017 and received positive feedback from exhibitors, many of whom recorded excellent levels of interest and sales at the event. We’d like to wish our partners, exhibitors, and everyone we’ve worked with on IPEX every success as the industry continues to evolve.”

    According to Andy McCourt, associate editor of Print21 and a long-term supporter of the show, the fault lay not in the stars but with some fundamental flaws in management.

    “It’s an understandable move by Informa Exhibitions. The lesson should have been learned long ago – never move away from your market; nurture and cherish your customers and most of all – don’t piss the trade media off!”

    IPEX long held a special place in the heart of the Australian and New Zealand Printing industries. With many print company owners proudly wearing a London School of Printing credential, the opportunity to add on a few weeks tax-free holiday in the ‘old country’ made the show a much loved pilgrimage.

    With the easy familiarity of language and custom, locals flocked in their hundreds to the National Convention Centre in Birmingham. The Print21 IPEX barbeque was a highlight of the industry’s social calendar.

    “Sad to see it go really, but it’s what Andy McCourt says, stay close to your market,” lamented Patrick Howard, former Print21 publisher, who along with McCourt, organised the famed barbeques. “But we still have drupa.”

     

     

     

  • FESPA Berlin – Nessan Cleary’s in-depth report

    Messe Berlin, site of Fespa 2018.

    Fespa has always been about wide format printing but this year’s show saw high volume printers mixed with industrial textile printers and even corrugated printing.

    Conventional wisdom has it that large format printing is mainly about sign making and display graphics but wide format inkjet technology is pushing beyond this, which was abundantly clear at this year’s main Fespa event in Berlin, Germany. Of course, there was still plenty of sign making in evidence, but there was a renewed focus on taking this to high volume industrial markets, including corrugated printing, and alongside noticeably more clothing and home furnishings solutions.

    There was a growing use of robotics for automated loading and unloading of substrates. Most robots are designed for industrial applications so they offer long life with little maintenance, which makes for a very flexible and cost-effective solution, even taking into account the cost of integrating the control systems to synchronise the loading with the printing. Canon, for example, demonstrated a robot next to an Arizona flatbed loading media to the printer and then unloading it direct to an Océ ProCut cutting table. The system was developed with a Dutch customer, Van Vliet Printing, but is relatively easy to interface with the Arizona.

    This robot on the Canon stand loads media to the Arizona flatbed, and then unloads it to the cutting table.

    Fespa set aside one hall for corrugated printing, with the main attraction being the Fujifilm stand with an Onset X3 complete with robot for automated unloading. Ashley Playford, national sales manager for Fujifilm Australia says that a big advantage of using robots is that they can handle different stack heights regardless of how thick the material is. There’s a choice of robots depending on what each customer is trying to achieve.

    From left: Ashley Playford, national sales manager Fujifilm Australia, and Graham Blackall, ANZ technical sales specialist, with the Fujifilm Acuity Ultra.

    Naturally, several vendors used the show to launch new printers, mainly 3.2m wide machines aimed at the production end of the market. Fujifilm showed off its brand new superwide rollfed printer, the Acuity Ultra, with a choice of 3.2m and 5m widths. It can print on up to three rolls simultaneously, with independent spindles so that the rolls can hold different amounts of media. It can produce up to 236 sqm/hr. It uses greyscale Kyocera printheads with 3, 7 and 14 picolitre drop sizes and maximum resolution of 1200 x 1200 dpi, with the prints on the stand demonstrating exceptional image quality for a superwide printer. Graham Blackall, ANZ technical sales specialist for Fujifilm, says: “There’s a lot of high volume machines in the market but the market is becoming more discerning about quality now and just being ‘good enough’ is no longer good enough.”

    It uses conventional UV curing rather than LED, but has an innovative water-cooling system on the vacuum table so that it can still print to heat-sensitive materials. Blackall says that the printer can handle textiles, with soft signage becoming an emerging market, and that it can also print to mesh materials. There are eight colour channels including CMYK plus light cyan and light magenta, as well as two whites. The ink is a new, high-quality, low film weight Uvijet GS Fujifilm ink that is said to be suitable for interior graphic display work.

    EFI introduced its new 3.2m wide Vutek H-series platform. It’s a hybrid designed around a roll to roll chassis and with tables for rigid media. However, there is a new linear drive magnetic carriage that should offer a more precise transport mechanism for boards than the belt and pulley system that most hybrids use. There’s automated table and carriage alignment and fully automated printhead maintenance as well as built-in diagnostic systems for dealing to help with servicing, both remote and on-site.

    There are two versions, both using Ricoh Gen5 printheads with three different drop sizes of 7, 14 and 21 picolitres. The H3 series have three heads per colour and can produce 74 boards per hour, while the H5 have five heads per colour and print 109bph.

    Agfa announced a new hybrid 3.3m wide printer, the Jeti Tauro H3300 LED, which takes boards up to 3.3 x 2.44m or roll media up to 600mm in diameter. There’s a choice of two inksets: the general purpose Annuvia 1551, and Anuvia 1250, for absorbent media, such as paper and cardboard. Strangely, the company opted to show a tiny lego model rather than the actual printer!

    Mutoh answered customer demands by showing off its first true flatbed printer, the PerformanceJet 2508UF, which takes boards up to 1250 x 2540 mm and can handle media up to 100 mm thick and up to 50 Kg/ sqm in weight. The bed is split into different vacuum zones. This is a UV LED printer that can be configured with either two sets of CMYK or CMYK plus white and varnish. It uses four greyscale printheads but can be field-upgraded to six heads, for dual CMYK plus white and varnish.

    Mutoh also showed off a new 1.62m wide roll-to-roll device, the ValueJet 1638UR. Resolution is up to 1400 x 1400 dpi and it takes Mutoh’s new US11 UV LED ink that’s designed to work with a very wide range of substrates. It prints CMYK plus white and clear ink.

    Latex reinvented

    HP used the Fespa show to launch its first rigid latex printer, the R2000, complete with HP’s first latex white ink. The R2000 is a hybrid device, taking both roll-fed and rigid media up to 2.5m wide media and 50mm thick, and rolls up to 100kg. It has a wide platen, with 14 automatic independent vacuum chambers to hold boards in place. It uses a belt system to pull the media through the printer but has an optical sensor that watches as the media advances and can correct the movement of that media. It can print at up to 88 sqm/hr or 49 sqm/hr in six-pass mode.

    HP launched its R2000 hybrid, capable of printing to rigid materials.

    The latex ink has been completely redesigned to work with rigid materials as well as flexibles. It cures at a lower temperature which allows this printer to work with more heat sensitive materials than HP’s previous latex printers. HP has had to take out the scratch resistance built into its roll-fed inks to improve the jetting so there’s a new Latex Overcoat to help protect prints.

    HP has used the HDNA printheads from its PageWide presses, which have twice the number of nozzles with the extra row of nozzles used to recirculate the ink within the head. This is essential for printing with white ink as the heavier particles can settle in the bottom of the tanks or clog the heads.

    Ricoh is also working on a new latex printer, showing a prototype of a new roll-fed model at Fespa, which should be available towards the end of this year. Unlike Ricoh’s previous latex printer, which was built on a Mimaki chassis, this has been developed entirely by Ricoh. Angelo Mandelli, wide format product manager for Ricoh Europe, says that it can print at 40 sqm/hr in six pass mode on banner materials and at 25 sqm/hr for production quality on vinyl. It prints CMYK plus white for now but Mandelli says that Ricoh will probably add orange and green to expand the colour gamut.

    Ricoh is clearly making a much more decisive play for the wide format market, showing also a new flatbed printer, the Ricoh Pro T7210, which is mainly aimed at industrial printing markets. It takes media up to 2.1 × 3.2 metres, and up to 110mm thick. It’s capable of 50sqm/hr in Standard mode, which doubles to 100 sqm/hr in the high-speed mode. Resolution is 1200 dpi and the ink is Ricoh’s own LED UV-curable ink with a choice of four, five or six colours with the full inkset including CMYK plus white and a clear ink or varnish as well as a primer. 

    Paul Thompson, business development manager ANZ for DTG and visual display solutions at Ricoh Australia, says that much of the print industry, including large format, has become commoditised by focussing on price but that Ricoh is concentrating on adding value. He points out that Ricoh makes its own printheads and supplies heads to many other vendors, adding: “We see that inkjet is the future and that if we get it at the right quality and cost then it will make inroads in other areas.”

    An obvious example of this is the growing textiles market. Ricoh showed off a neat desktop direct to garment printer, the Ri100, which can print various items such as T-shirts, cloth bags, cushion covers and sweatshirts. It prints mainly to cotton, including blends of up to 50 percent cotton. There’s an option to include a separate heat press, the Ricoh Rh 100 Finisher, which has the same 399 x 698 mm footprint so that the printer can be stacked on top of it.

    Ricoh’s Ri100 – note the RH100 finishing unit underneath it.

    EFI Reggiani has developed a new six colour pigment ink with binder with CMYK plus red and blue for its printers, which are mainly used for home furnishing and fashion printing to materials with natural fibres such as cotton and linen. Giorgio Sala, EFI Reggiani’s ink application specialist, says: “We can eliminate the post treatment. In the drier we can fix the ink because the binder is inside the ink.” He adds: “The new ink is designed for Kyocera printheads, which all of our machines have, so we can use it with the existing machines.”

    Mimaki showed off a new version of the Tiger 1800, which was developed by its subsidiary La Meccanica and now gains a number of features typical to Mimaki printers, such as its MAPS nozzle redundancy technology as well as automated maintenance. It’s got Kyocera printheads, with the resolution raised from 600dpi to 1200 dpi.

    In conclusion, there’s a clear trend from this Fespa toward more industrialised printing for volume markets including display graphics as well as garments and home furnishings. There’s more automation, including the use of robots, as well as automatic maintenance to improve productivity, while at the same time most vendors have also improved image quality. The show itself felt extremely busy, with over 20000 visitors crammed into the halls over four days, proof that the market for wide format technology shows no sign of slowing down.

    Next year’s Fespa show takes place in Munich, Germany, from 14 – 17th May.

  • Visual Impact Sydney almost booked out

    The industry’s leading sign and display expo, Visual Impact, is coming to the Harbour City from 12-14 September in Halls 5 & 6 of the Sydney Showground at Sydney Olympic Park, and the show is shaping up as a pivotal one for sign, display, screen and wide-format printers.

     According to organisers Visual Connections, VI Sydney is already 95% subscribed, guaranteeing a comprehensive display of the very latest innovations in technology, equipment, materials and media for the thousands of business owners and key decision makers who are expected to attend.

    Peter Harper, general manager – Trade Shows & Publications for show organisers Visual Connections, said he expects the show to be one of the best ever, with an expanded focus and several new initiatives which organisers hope will extend the reach and relevance of the show, and increase its value to visitors.

    “As in previous years, the list of exhibitors for the Sydney show includes everyone from the industry’s largest and most comprehensive names, to smaller specialist and niche suppliers, all under the one roof,” Harper said.

    “This year, however, we’ll also have a significant focus on the latest innovations in screen printing, alongside more familiar offerings like wide-format, design and MIS, POP, display and expo systems, laser cutting and engraving, and structural and illuminated signage technologies.

    “This is something of a departure from recent shows but textile printing is clearly a very relevant area for those in the print, sign and display sector, and it makes perfect sense to expand our reach into this area.”

    As well as the exhibition, visitors can of course expect to benefit from a program of seminars and workshops, which add enormous value to the show experience.

    “This year, we’re introducing daily breakfast information sessions, giving visitors a head-start on the day by enjoying a delicious and nutritious meal while taking advantage of high-quality education,” Harper says adding that he expects to confirm topics and open registrations for these sessions within the next few weeks.

    “The result is a genuinely comprehensive show combining innovation and information, to help businesses improve their performance, increase competitiveness, creates new revenue streams and plan for their future success.”

    Visual Impact Sydney will run from 10am – 8pm on Wednesday 12, from 10am until 6pm on Thursday 13, and from 10am till 4pm on Friday 14 September.

    “We’re also making it even easier for visitors to get to the Sydney Showground, with a morning and afternoon shuttle bus between Homebush and Darling Harbour, and extended hours on the Wednesday evening until 8pm,” Harper said.

    Registrations for the show are now open, with visitors encouraged to pre-register to skip the queues and make the most of their time at the show.

    For more information and the latest news on VI Sydney, go to www.visualconnections.org.au