News Archive

  • Prepare for more consolidation: Rasmussen 

    RR 135 a

    Consolidation in the printing industry shows no sign of abating in 2017 and business owners need to prepare for the flow-on effects, says industry expert Richard Rasmussen, who has outlined three key points that printers should keep in mind for the year ahead.

  • Australia leads global outdoor surge 

    outdoor 135 a

    Global out-of-home advertising revenues, including digital and traditional printed media, jumped more than six per cent to over $US49 billion in 2016, with Australia leading the way in overall and digital out-of-home (DOOH) ad revenue growth.

  • New high-speed HD CtP from Screen 

    screen 135 a

    Screen Australia released an all-new B1 computer-to plate device featuring a high-definition option capable of resolving up to 700lpi on offset plates. “With the high-resolution options and the right plate and processing environment, offset print quality can reach new levels.”

  • Print’s one-off carbon footprint 

    collegemagazine.com 135

    As the internet’s power usage continues to grow exponentially, a major argument for using print instead of e-media is that print has a one-off carbon footprint, writes Laurel Brunner.

  • Media Super 

    Media Super 135 b

    Changes are coming to superannuation on 1 July 2017. Important changes include the introduction of a low-income super tax offset (LISTO) and a transfer balance cap, lowering the concessional contributions cap, reducing the Division 293 income threshold and the annual non-concessional cap.

  • ACCC ‘concerned’ about PMP/IPMG merger 

    rod simms 135 a

    Corporate regulator’s preliminary view is that the merger may substantially lessen competition in the supply of heatset web offset printing.

  • ACCC delays PMP/IPMG merger 

    Matthew Bickford-Smith 135 a

    PMP has been forced to delay its planned merger with IPMG by almost two months to allow the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission to take a closer look at the proposed deal.

  • Dominion Print buys Graphitype 

    Kelvin Cage 135

    Sydney’s Dominion Print Group acquired 30-year old commercial print business Graphitype Printing Services from retiring co-owners/directors Dave and Kath Morris. “Nobody’s gone broke so it’s really a good news story for the industry,” says Kelvin Gage, Dominion’s CEO (pictured).

  • Book industry slams Productivity Commission report 

    Sidney Nolan's Ned Kelly, NGA 135

    “The Productivity Commission is like a deranged hairdresser insisting their client wears a mullet wig,” says Man Booker Prize-winning Australian author Richard Flanagan. Books Create Australia called on the government to reject the commission’s recommendations on copyright.

  • That was the year – That was! 

    change-16

    Whew! What a year! Filled with surprises and disruption, 2016 is one for the records. In our own small pond of the Australian and New Zealand printing industry it was also a year of radical change. Plenty of crisis but along with that a great fund of hope and ambition to carry us forward towards 2017.

  • Spicers signs deal to break hybrid deadlock 

    ROBERT KAYE 135 a

    Spicers – formerly PaperlinX – agreed to a plan that it hopes will end a long-running dispute with hybrid shareholders and restore the company’s capital structure. Hybrid-holders would take a 68.3 per cent stake in the company and Spicers chairman Robert Kaye (pictured) would stand down.

  • Print duopoly the story of 2016: IndustryEdge 

    IE 135 cb

    The establishment of a duopoly in the commercial printing sector was the biggest story of 2016, according to industry bible IndustryEdge. “The difficulty is that as with all industrial scale rationalisations, there will simply have to be casualties.”

  • McCourt’s ReVerb: 2016 wrap and 2017 crystal ball 

    Xmas 135

    When the rooster crows at the break of dawn…“Look out your window, and I’ll be gone,” so goes the Bob Dylan lyric. By the end of January 2017, it will be the Year of the Rooster in the Chinese calendar, possibly a good time for us all to wake anew and face brand new days, writes Andy McCourt.

  • Jet Tech opens ink centre in Jakarta 

    PureTone 135

    Jet Technologies has completed its purpose-built climate controlled ink distribution centre at its in plant in Jakarta, where it will feature the ‘revolutionary’ UV flexo PureTone range from UK-based narrow-web print specialist Pulse Roll Label Products.

  • Komori to focus on innovation in 2017 

    Satoshi Mochida 135 a

    Komori president Satoshi Mochida says despite a ‘murkier’ outlook for the ‘less than robust’ world economy, the press giant will continue to push forward in 2017 with initiatives aimed at innovation and transformation.

  • Einstein’s relative found in Gold Coast – theoretically 

    Harry4

    Astounding discovery of Harry Brelsford’s link to Swiss genius proves special theory of general relativity is more widespread than first suspected.

  • Starleaton – ‘thanks for a great year.’ 

    Eaton-130x95

    Starleaton welcomed the acquisition of its major wide format supplier Neschen by Blue Cap – a Munich-based investment company with a profile in the graphic arts sector. “Blue Cap is not a typical private equity company in that it does not have exit strategies from the word ‘go,’” says CEO Ben Eaton (pictured).

  • Bickford-Smith rallies PMP votes for merger 

    PMP-thumb-130x951-11

    UPDATE: PMP shareholders have overwhelmingly voted to approve the company’s merger with IPMG, with 99 percent in favour of the deal.

  • Changing of the guard at manroland 

    Steve Dunwell 133

    Well-known industry identity Steve Dunwell is retiring from his role as managing director of manroland Australasia. He announced the appointment of Dennis Wickham as the new managing director, with Andreas Schwoepfinger, as the new director of technical services.

  • A history of book printing: Fujifilm blog 

    fujifilm135

    Most people outside of the printing and graphic arts industry learn about our industry from books. The incredible range and scope of all other things printed, from wallpaper to solar panels, is hidden behind the veil of text and images on paper.